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Poll: Do you make exceptions and translate into your source language?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 19:38
SITE STAFF
May 30, 2017

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "Do you make exceptions and translate into your source language?".

This poll was originally submitted by Nele Van den Broeck. View the poll results »



 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 03:38
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
No, never May 30, 2017

As a matter of principle I translate exclusively to my target language (European Portuguese) though I lived in the francophone part of Belgium for 30 years and I’m fluent in French…

 

Muriel Vasconcellos  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 19:38
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
No, never May 30, 2017

Not for clients. I do it informally for friends and family from time to time but never for compensation.

(The irony is that, because of my name, some participants on KudoZ have assumed that I was not a native speaker of English --as in "Thanks for your answer, but I have chosen Jane Doe's because she is a native speaker.")


 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:38
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
No, never. May 30, 2017

Not professionally. I have tried to do so for my own amusement occasionally. And I often have to write in it, to correspond with clients who don't know English. I try to get it as near right as I can, but never with total confidence.

 

Axelle H.  Identity Verified
Member (2017)
English to French
+ ...
idem .. May 30, 2017

Muriel Vasconcellos wrote:

Not for clients. I do it informally for friends and family from time to time but never for compensation.

(The irony is that, because of my name, some participants on KudoZ have assumed that I was not a native speaker of English --as in "Thanks for your answer, but I have chosen Jane Doe's because she is a native speaker.")


I suppose I must have my birth name, not my married name ..


 

Chris S  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Swedish to English
+ ...
No May 30, 2017

Pre-empting the Danes and Eastern Europeans who will shortly be wading in to argue that they are quite capable of translating both ways thank you very much, that may be true up to a point but I would always want to be aiming for the next level.

If I lived in Sweden I would no doubt be able to translate competently into Swedish, but I would never be able to excel in the way that I believe I do in English, which would make me unhappy.

PS
+1 for misleading surnames


 

Marta Cervera Areny
Spain
Local time: 04:38
Catalan to Spanish
+ ...
Not any more May 30, 2017

I used to do it for friends and family, but not any more. The result is not as good as it would be from a native speaker, and it requires a lot more time and effort... so when people ask, I just refer them to some native colleague...

 

EvaVer  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:38
Member (2012)
Czech to English
+ ...
I always... May 30, 2017

but not in all my languages. I have 3 target languages, but never accept to translate into the other - source only - languages. Once a client persuaded me, against my strong resistance, to translate one sentence into Romanian - it took me several hours to check every bit of it.
For those who say "but I cannot...": are you translating literature? If so, you are right. But company memos? Managers often write their mother tongue much worse than I (and you, I am sure) write my (your) non-native languages. Contracts? They are pretty standard, and you can find models on the net. etc. When quality is really important, I use proofreaders. But many clients have things translated just to "see what it's about".

[Edited at 2017-05-30 09:45 GMT]


 

Mario Chavez  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:38
English to Spanish
+ ...
Inverse translation, reverse translation May 30, 2017

Why would inverse translation be an exception? Well, with some of us it would be for some reasons, but not as a “matter of principle,” as if performing an inverse (or reverse) translation into the source language were illegal, unprincipled or unethical.

The procedure of translating into the source language, also called inverse translation, reverse translation and other names by scholars, is part of what is called directionality. Here's a well-researched discussion for those interested:

https://books.google.pt/books?id=KHTkbduNIjgC&pg=PA37&lpg=PA37&dq=reverse%20translation%20translation%20studies&source=bl&ots=VSnO7Cti3A&sig=qfaYnpR5JiC0WupUFN3yt0Iy61g&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjh0r3A9o7UAhXH1hQKHezIBGUQ6AEIQzAF#v=onepage&q=reverse%20translation%20translation%20studies&f=false

Dipping into the history of translation is sorely needed in these parts.

icon_smile.gif

On another topic, I don't accept anything imposed by online landlord just because I choose to post something.
icon_biggrin.gif


 

Julieta Moss
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:38
Spanish to English
+ ...


Posted via
ProZ.com Mobile


It is easier for me than translating to my native language May 30, 2017

I have now lived in the UK for nine years, living in a family who only speak English, working in an English speaking environment.

My language combination is very badly paid, because there is a lot of supply from Latin America and they can survive on a lower rate. On the other hand, the opposite combination is very expensive, so I can be very competitive and the customers like that.

Recently I have started working for a new client into my native language and I am really struggling since I have not done this for a very long time.

Oh and by the way, I am also taking advantage of my new surname!


 

M. Anna Kańduła  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:38
English to Polish
Only under certain conditions May 30, 2017

Which means it happened once: a client explicitly requested a native of the source language. The translation was not for publication, and they wanted to make sure all colloquialisms and idioms (and misspelled words) in the source were understood fully.

 

Julian Holmes  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 11:38
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
No, never May 30, 2017

I could if I wanted to but it would have to be given a once over by a NJS (native Japanese speaker). Besides, what's the point of doing this when J>E rates are at least twice those of E>J, anyway?

I have, ahem, been complemented on my Japanese prose before. An article I wrote in Japanese for a book about Osaka got less red ink from the chief editor than the articles submitted by NJS contributors - says he polishing his fingernails on his shirt icon_biggrin.gif


 

Angus Stewart  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:38
Member (2011)
French to English
+ ...
No, never May 30, 2017

I was told at University when studying translation that it was professionally unethical to translate into my source languages and so have never done so.

 

Yetta J Bogarde  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 04:38
Member (2012)
English to Danish
+ ...
Both ways May 30, 2017

and so far no client has uttered any complaint.

Also, I am not so sure my native language is my best.

[Edited at 2017-05-30 10:19 GMT]


 

writeaway  Identity Verified
French to English
+ ...
Speaking a language fluently does not equate with being a native speaker May 30, 2017

A battle cry used by many:
Julieta Moss wrote:

It is easier for me than translating to my native language



I am always amused when I read this claim. First of all, we are supposed to be professional translators, i.e. professional linguists. What sort of professional linguist forgets his/her native language to the extent of no longer being able to write in it?
And English is deceptively easy. As in most other languages, spoken English and written English often go their separate ways. Being able to hold a conservation doesn't automatically mean being able to write at a professional level.

And naturally my reply to the poll is: No, never.


 
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