Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Poll: If you were offered a well-paid position in-house, would you drop freelancing?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

ProZ.com Staff
Local time: 20:24
SITE STAFF
Jan 11

This forum topic is for the discussion of the poll question "If you were offered a well-paid position in-house, would you drop freelancing?".

View the poll results »



Direct link Reply with quote
 

Muriel Vasconcellos  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 20:24
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
No Jan 11

That's what I used to do, for about 20 years. I quit so I could freelance.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

EvaVer  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:24
Member (2012)
Czech to English
+ ...
Certainly not now Jan 11

I was offered such a position when I was about 30, considered it for some time, then refused. And I am so glad I did! I was able to observe the person who actually took it over a few years - I would have hated to be in her place.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 04:24
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
No (been there, done that !) Jan 11

As I said before (another very similar poll) I worked in-house (an EU institution) for 20 years and retired in 2006. I loved the work, my boss, my colleagues and… the pay (I usually earned much more than I do now). I often miss the camaraderie, the lunchtime chats, the teamwork and the helpdesk support! At my age, I doubt very much I would be offered any in-house position, so I’ll keep on FREElancing!

P.S. By the way, these translation positions are not offered! You have to apply and my experience is that the selection procedure is rather tough and will go through different stages (http://europa.eu/epso/doc/selection_procedure_en.pdf)

[Edited at 2018-01-11 09:19 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Stuart Hoskins
Local time: 05:24
Czech to English
+ ...
Probably Jan 11

I'm one of those incapable of finding a work-life balance. I've spent 25-odd years being unable to say no to work, up all hours, pulling all-nighters, giving up weekends. Last year, my holiday was one long weekend in a city a couple of hours away. Sometimes I tell myself the idea of working just eight hours a day, with four or five weeks' paid annual holiday, must be bliss.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Axelle H.  Identity Verified
Member (2017)
English to French
+ ...
No Jan 11

Teresa Borges wrote:

I often miss the camaraderie, the lunchtime chats, the teamwork and the helpdesk support!


Idem. But I love my life balance as a freelancer. And the fact I can choose which documents I will translate.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Michael Harris  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 05:24
Member (2006)
German to English
No Jan 11

Or it would have to be extremely well paid. But then I would miss the freedom of working in the garden and going to other places whenever I want to.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Anton Konashenok  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 05:24
English to Russian
+ ...
No way nohow Jan 11

My freedom is not for sale. Apart from that, even the very best in-house positions pay a lot less (whether per hour or per year) than an experienced freelancer can earn.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 05:24
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Not now, but it taught me how professionals work Jan 11

It depends on many things apart from the money, but in my case a quite tolerably paid in-house job was the best thing that happened to me in a long time.

If the other conditions are right, I would encourage a beginner to go for it. It also depends what kind of job - if it was project management, rather than translation, then I would think twice, but it could still be a very good idea if the agency allowed PMs to think independently as linguists, check and edit texts, and actually negotiate with clients and translators. If the PMs are simply office juniors who count words, quote a rate and send e-mails, no! (But that kind of agency would not pay its PMs very well anyway... )

The experience of having colleagues to exchange ideas and act as a safety net really helped me on my way. The firm supported me as I took my diploma, and made me learn to use Trados... which I hated at first, but I have actually been grateful for many years.

It's a pity that agency does not exist any more, but there are others, and I certainly would have gone freelance at some time later.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Gianluca Marras  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 05:24
Member (2008)
English to Italian
Yes Jan 11

I was about to do it - but again, we did not find an agreement about the salary.
So Yes I would, but it must be very well-paid.
Reason? the tax and retirement system in Italy is a total mess, and although being a freelancer has its own good aspects, from a future perspective you can only worry, a in-house job at least gives you some (not many) chances for the future...


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Romina Eva Pérez Escorihuela
Argentina
Local time: 01:24
Member (2010)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Nothing better than freelancing (for me) Jan 11

I've already worked as a full-time in-house translator for an important US bank in Argentina, with a semi-senior position, a high salary and benefits. It really helped to start my professional career, to specialize in financial translation, to learn about a different world, to meet colleagues, buy my own car, move to my fist flat... but I ended up with stress-related health problems when I decided to quit to become a freelancer - at 27!

Christine Andersen wrote:

The experience of having colleagues to exchange ideas and act as a safety net really helped me on my way. The firm supported me as I took my diploma, and made me learn to use Trados... which I hated at first, but I have actually been grateful for many years.


The same happened to me at the bank!:)

Stuart Hoskins wrote:

I'm one of those incapable of finding a work-life balance. I've spent 25-odd years being unable to say no to work, up all hours, pulling all-nighters, giving up weekends. Last year, my holiday was one long weekend in a city a couple of hours away. Sometimes I tell myself the idea of working just eight hours a day, with four or five weeks' paid annual holiday, must be bliss.


It was hard for me to learn not to do the same, Stuart! But I take as a reference the fact that my husband works Monday through Fridays from 9 to 6, so I try to stick to that so we can enjoy free time together. Of course, there are exceptions: although I never accept a translation on weekends, I do conference interpreting, if necessary (once in a while, it's not that common). However, working from home as a translator in my own home office (with a separate room for that) poses great challenges: I'm distracted very often! So, last year I found a few months of coaching sessions really helpful to manage my work-life lack of balance!

[Edited at 2018-01-11 12:54 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Ricki Farn
Germany
Local time: 05:24
Member (2005)
English to German
No Jan 11

Nothing better than a few years inhouse to get your translation career started. After that,



Direct link Reply with quote
 

Kristina Cosumano  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 05:24
Member (2015)
German to English
Sure, Jan 11

if my prospective future workplace was within 15 minutes' drive from my home. Otherwise, nah.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mario Chavez  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:24
English to Spanish
+ ...
Several reasons, several scenarios Jan 11

Gianluca Marras wrote:

I was about to do it - but again, we did not find an agreement about the salary.
So Yes I would, but it must be very well-paid.
Reason? the tax and retirement system in Italy is a total mess, and although being a freelancer has its own good aspects, from a future perspective you can only worry, a in-house job at least gives you some (not many) chances for the future...


The US health care system, not the best in the world, is being rendered a huge mess thanks to the current Brat-in-Office. In 1998, I took my first in-house translator job because I needed the safety of paid health care from the company (freelancers could find health care plans, but they were few and expensive at the time). Although we have Social Security guaranteed when we retire, companies here offer private retirement accounts and many offer parallel matching contributions (you put 1% of your salary in that account, the company puts another 1%, for example).

As others have said, in-house positions in my country exist, but their salaries are on the low end, unless you work for a gaming company or other software vendor.

In early 2014, I was twice interviewed and offered a full-time translator job in New Jersey (for a respectable media company) but we couldn't agree on salary. Pity.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mario Chavez  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:24
English to Spanish
+ ...
Great chance for beginners Jan 11

Christine Andersen wrote:

It depends on many things apart from the money, but in my case a quite tolerably paid in-house job was the best thing that happened to me in a long time.

If the other conditions are right, I would encourage a beginner to go for it. It also depends what kind of job - if it was project management, rather than translation, then I would think twice, but it could still be a very good idea if the agency allowed PMs to think independently as linguists, check and edit texts, and actually negotiate with clients and translators. If the PMs are simply office juniors who count words, quote a rate and send e-mails, no! (But that kind of agency would not pay its PMs very well anyway... )

The experience of having colleagues to exchange ideas and act as a safety net really helped me on my way. The firm supported me as I took my diploma, and made me learn to use Trados... which I hated at first, but I have actually been grateful for many years.

It's a pity that agency does not exist any more, but there are others, and I certainly would have gone freelance at some time later.


Even if the stated salary is not great, a translator beginner would be stupid not to take it. As Christine pointed out, there are advantages. Many translation school graduates are trained to think they can become translators in their chosen specialization the moment they get a diploma. But reality sets in: they'll need practical training in CAT tools (that's how I learned to use Trados during my first in-house job), project management, working in tandem with different professionals, learning about budgeting, etc. The advantages are there, but beginners need to be reminded of them.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Poll: If you were offered a well-paid position in-house, would you drop freelancing?

Advanced search






Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »
CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search