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SCANDINAVIAN STUDIES: Language combinations and chances for a career in EU organisations
Thread poster: grzzpo

Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:13
Flemish to English
+ ...
Reference Jul 26, 2011

Alexandra Lindqvist wrote:


Now there are competitions with Czech, Maltese, Latvian, Spanish with at least 100 days of C.I.-experience, Swedish. Last year, it was French, German, Dutch and English. Next year, it may be another series of languages, such as Croatian (new E.U.-member in 2013) and when Iceland joins, Icelandic as main language. The last competition with Polish as main language was in 2009.


Really is there not according to this link (http://europa.eu/epso/apply/news/news107_en.htm) seems to me there's Polish this year

As far as money goes for translations from Swedish to Polish don’t look in Poland there’s lots of Polish people there look after Swedish companies who also probably have more money.



The poster referred to a position as interpreter, not as translator

And maybe German or French into Polish as an interpreter?


I don't see Polish mentioned on the list http://europa.eu/epso/apply/news/news108_en.htm
Analytical skills in languages is a way to master the structure of a language.
I learnt Spanish by having to analyse texts of 20 lines, with lots of , no . and a lot of subclauses of the first and second degree.




.








[Edited at 2011-07-26 06:49 GMT]

[Edited at 2011-07-26 06:52 GMT]


 

grzzpo
Poland
Local time: 11:13
Polish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
What is meant here? Jul 26, 2011

Alexandra Lindqvist wrote:
As far as money goes for translations from Swedish to Polish don’t look in Poland there’s lots of Polish people there look after Swedish companies who also probably have more money.

Tack, but I do not know what it means.


 

grzzpo
Poland
Local time: 11:13
Polish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Culture Jul 26, 2011

Madeleine MacRae Klintebo wrote:

Which Scandinavian country would you prefer to live in for at least 1-2 years?

In order to translate or interpret from language B to language A at a professional level you need a very good command of language B (as well as native command of language A). A "very good command" involves not only being able to read texts in language B - with the occasional help of a dictionary. You also need an understanding of the relevant culture - yes, even when translating technical manuals and particularly when translating texts with legal implications (EU documentation, for example).

Spending 1-2 years living and working or studying in your source language's country is, in my view, the minimum required for professional translation.

PS. On a personal level, I've spent just under 1 year living in Italy and speak and write Italian more or less fluently, however I still don't feel confident adding Italian as a source language.


Can you give me an example of the relevant culture being extremely important when interpreting? I do not say that it is not important, but what you have written makes me curious. I will not only learn the language, but also the cultural interesting facts about Scandinavian culture, history, literature. I don't like literature and this is, I think, the only thing that can make me unable to be a good translator and interpreter.

It may be only a C language for me.

I do not know whether it will be possible to live there such a long time because of private matters. Why not confident? Italian sounds like a good piece of music.

[Zmieniono 2011-07-26 10:26 GMT]


 

grzzpo
Poland
Local time: 11:13
Polish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
For me it is a choice between Swedish and Danish Jul 26, 2011

Michele Fauble wrote:

Norwegian is the Scandinavian language I speak fluently, and I translate from Norwegian, Swedish and Danish. I get regular work in all three, but I get more work in Swedish. When someone asks me which Scandinavian language I would recommend learning, I usually suggest Swedish because of the lack of standardization of Norwegian and the difficulty of Danish pronunciation. Swedish also has the largest number of speakers.





[Edited at 2011-07-25 23:11 GMT]

And that is exactly why I want to learn Swedish.


 

grzzpo
Poland
Local time: 11:13
Polish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Specialisation & demand Jul 26, 2011

Christine Andersen wrote:
Another thing to consider is a subject area. Now some Swedes have had their say, you might like to think about Denmark too. With a population of around 5.5 million as opposed to something like 9.3 million in Sweden, there are areas of industry that you will not find in Denmark.

While Denmark is strong on medicines and pharmaceuticals, agriculture and wind power, among other things, there is no car industry. Sweden has Saab and Volvo...

Think about a specialist area that interests you, because as a translator you will spend a lot of time on terminology research and background reading about your specialist subject. If you do not care for the subject you are working on, it will soon get boring, while it can really add to the enjoyment of translation if you can read up on a subject that you like.

Sometimes 'dull' or 'dry' subjects become interesting as you learn more about them, but not always. I know a couple of colleagues who became quite fascinated with law when they had to learn the basics as part of their training. Others scrape through the exam and never touch it again!

Your subject area might influence your choice of language.

The only one thing I know now is the fact that I will try to do another studies simultaneously - mathematics for economy. I do not know whether the dean will agree and how the situation will look like (the law changes), but I hope so.

I have no idea whether there is a demand for such a rare combination on the job market, but I hope so.


Another point is that there is increasing trade between Denmark and Poland and probably Sweden and Poland too. I believe the need for translation will grow.

I have occasionally translated contracts and other texts into English, which I really felt should be translated into Polish. English is a second language for both parties, and it would be best if they both had the text in their own languages. (The Danes have the Danish source text after all.)

On other occasions, for instance when I translate consumer information, declarations of contents (of food products or cosmetics) and instructions for use, my English versions are sent on to other translators who cannot read Scandinavian languages - sometimes including Polish translators. Agencies would be very happy to work with someone who could translate directly into Polish, but there are not many who are really qualified.

I hope you enjoy your studies, and wish you the very best of luck!



Is it possible that they do not even think about translating such documents into Polish?
Thank you for the answer


 

grzzpo
Poland
Local time: 11:13
Polish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Analytical skills Jul 26, 2011

Williamson wrote:
Analytical skills in languages is a way to master the structure of a language.
I learnt Spanish by having to analyse texts of 20 lines, with lots of , no . and a lot of subclauses of the first and second degree.

This is a kind of a riddle, isn't it?
And this is exactly what I love about languages!


 

Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 11:13
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
I'm no great fan of literature either Jul 26, 2011

-- If you mean artistic literature, and fiction! Apart from the occasional biography, a little goes a very long way with me.

In fact newspapers and magazine articles, professional journals and history are at least as relevant to becoming a translator and learning the culture of a country. Preferably, you need to see the tiny details for yourself, and learn the general attitude to small, everyday things.

You can learn a lot from various websites these days, including the
... See more
-- If you mean artistic literature, and fiction! Apart from the occasional biography, a little goes a very long way with me.

In fact newspapers and magazine articles, professional journals and history are at least as relevant to becoming a translator and learning the culture of a country. Preferably, you need to see the tiny details for yourself, and learn the general attitude to small, everyday things.

You can learn a lot from various websites these days, including the ones that are translated... either well or not so well!

How do they write instruction manuals, or for EU purposes, legislation, another area where you will find big differences?

You can get an impression by spending a couple of weeks in a country, if you go to the right places behind the tourist facade.

Why not post in the 'Exchange' section on this site and find someone who will help, and you can probably do it fairly cheaply.
http://www.proz.com/?sp=exchange


[Edited at 2011-07-26 11:33 GMT]
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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:13
Flemish to English
+ ...
Everybody choses the path (s)he deems best. Jul 27, 2011

A child copies the pattern of his mother and his surroundings. However, there is a school of thought/linguistics which teaches you how to acquire and master a language with the help of semantic and syntactic analysis. Nobody cares if you can pinpoint an adjectival sub-clause of the second degree, but it contributes to a better understanding of a language.
Once you know the pattern, you can play with the language. The rest is style, punctuation and further language acquisition.

... See more
A child copies the pattern of his mother and his surroundings. However, there is a school of thought/linguistics which teaches you how to acquire and master a language with the help of semantic and syntactic analysis. Nobody cares if you can pinpoint an adjectival sub-clause of the second degree, but it contributes to a better understanding of a language.
Once you know the pattern, you can play with the language. The rest is style, punctuation and further language acquisition.

With regard to applying for jobs:

I had a course of HRM, where your learn about the competencies of a candidate and how these match the applicant's profile. I have been instilled to keep in mind what the profile entails and that there is no such thing as the ideal applicant.

Who said:It's the economy, stupid ?

If I were a youngster of 18 with my present life-experiences and a good knowledge of math, I would not hesitate.
First study economics and acquire economic skills, if need be every year in another E.U.-country of my languages which I intend to use for interpreting. Then find a job in one of the countries where I have studied and only after a year or two try to get into a post-graduate interpreter training.

Many are too focused on a position as a linguist at an international institution, but forget that it is a narrow path with many candidates and only a limited number of jobs based upon the needs of the moment.

On the basis of languages, your profile, interests and aptitudes, there are job opportunities in the media, publicity, export, sales coordination, training jobs, teacher of languages, diplomacy, HRM, translation (at some national institutions both ways and not into the native language only) and interpreting.

On the basis of math and a BA/Master in applied economics and languages those opportunities are a lot broader.
Your analytical skills/math skills match just fine with those courses. example: to understand a course of asset management, you need to have a knowledge of statistics. If you want a job at one of the Big Five (consulting companies) or a major (Swiss) bank*, your chances of getting in with an economics background are much bigger than with languages. * Wages are somewhat higher than the average E.U.-starting-wage.

With regard to your long-term E.U.-aspirations: there are jobs for linguists are proofreaders (3 years of experience required), communication specialists, translators, interpreters and administrators (public administration). But once again, many candidates and few positions.

The first hurdle is to pass a preselection test, which consist of verbal, numerical and analytical, as well as a situational judgment test and see to it that you obtain a score higher than the cut-off limit (the xxx best scores pass to the next stage of the competition). Good analytical skills are very helpful in passing such a test.




[Edited at 2011-07-27 06:32 GMT]
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grzzpo
Poland
Local time: 11:13
Polish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
My parents still tell me Jul 27, 2011

They keep telling me...
Why don't you study economics, engineering, IT?
You will be unemployed after all!

But I am STUBBORN.

Right now I got a letter from University of Gdańsk - I am admitted for economic mathematics, and since I cannot do two courses at a time right now - I choose the Scandinavian studies.

Anyway I like mathematics so much that I am going to ask my dean for doing two majors beginning from the second year of studies simultaneou
... See more
They keep telling me...
Why don't you study economics, engineering, IT?
You will be unemployed after all!

But I am STUBBORN.

Right now I got a letter from University of Gdańsk - I am admitted for economic mathematics, and since I cannot do two courses at a time right now - I choose the Scandinavian studies.

Anyway I like mathematics so much that I am going to ask my dean for doing two majors beginning from the second year of studies simultaneously. A new law has been passed and only the best students will be given the opportunity to study two different subjects for free in 2012/13, and there is much uncertainty to how it will look like in practice, but I will try!

IMPORTANT:
Postgraduate interpreting course without preparation and practice? Is it possible?
I have sent a letter to University of Warsaw asking them whether they require something more than only a certain level of language command. I received no answer.
I was wondering whether it is possible to take up EMCI absolutely WITHOUT practice in interpreting... I consider English B/C, German and maybe French C (no Swedish/Danish in Warsaw).

Anyway is a degree in mathematics for economy also a good basis? Without boasting - I am pretty good.

Thank you all for the answers
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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:13
Flemish to English
+ ...
Where do you want to go today? Jul 28, 2011

grzzpo wrote:

They keep telling me...
Why don't you study economics, engineering, IT?
You will be unemployed after all!

But I am STUBBORN.

Right now I got a letter from University of Gdańsk - I am admitted for economic mathematics, and since I cannot do two courses at a time right now - I choose the Scandinavian studies.

Anyway I like mathematics so much that I am going to ask my dean for doing two majors beginning from the second year of studies simultaneously. A new law has been passed and only the best students will be given the opportunity to study two different subjects for free in 2012/13, and there is much uncertainty to how it will look like in practice, but I will try!

IMPORTANT:
Postgraduate interpreting course without preparation and practice? Is it possible?
I have sent a letter to University of Warsaw asking them whether they require something more than only a certain level of language command. I received no answer.
I was wondering whether it is possible to take up EMCI absolutely WITHOUT practice in interpreting... I consider English B/C, German and maybe French C (no Swedish/Danish in Warsaw).

Anyway is a degree in mathematics for economy also a good basis? Without boasting - I am pretty good.

Thank you all for the answers


It is possible. I know some people (students of an EMCI and some interpreters whose basic studies were law or political sciences and who persued an EMCI after graduating in law/economics/political sciences).

The advice of one EMCI-school is to quality newspapers in your A and working languages every day, to read a weekly every week and a monthly every month and write down the expressions/words/idioms you don't know.

I don't push people, but ask yourself how broad your chances on the larger labour market will be with economics+math while trying to improve your languages.
There is nothing which stands in the way of trying to get into an EMCI after you have worked a year or two to pay for that EMCI.
Besides, you will have two trumph-cards.
If you are asked to interpret the annual report of a corporation during an annual meeting, you will have a better understanding of that report than those who merely studied the terminology of the balance-sheet.
If you consider English B, there is such a thing as an Erasmus-year/programme: Why not try to go on an Erasmusprogramme with a London-based university or with another famous English University.
Or try to follow the entire biz.education in English or French (possible at the French-speaking university of Brussels, cost of the programme 785 euro per academic year)? Besides, most business courses are based upon American text-books and those are not written in Polish, are they?


 
Post removed: This post was hidden by a moderator or staff member for the following reason: duplicate post

juvera  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:13
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Cultural matters Jul 30, 2011

grzzpo wrote:

Madeleine MacRae Klintebo wrote:

Which Scandinavian country would you prefer to live in for at least 1-2 years?

In order to translate or interpret from language B to language A at a professional level you need a very good command of language B (as well as native command of language A). A "very good command" involves not only being able to read texts in language B - with the occasional help of a dictionary. You also need an understanding of the relevant culture - yes, even when translating technical manuals and particularly when translating texts with legal implications (EU documentation, for example).

Spending 1-2 years living and working or studying in your source language's country is, in my view, the minimum required for professional translation.



Can you give me an example of the relevant culture being extremely important when interpreting? I do not say that it is not important, but what you have written makes me curious. I will not only learn the language, but also the cultural interesting facts about Scandinavian culture, history, literature. I don't like literature and this is, I think, the only thing that can make me unable to be a good translator and interpreter.

It may be only a C language for me.

I do not know whether it will be possible to live there such a long time because of private matters.


I have a feeling that you have not had a chance to spend sufficient time abroad to realise the cultural differences between nations.

Do not underestimate the importance of living in the country of your chosen language for translation and particularly, for interpretation.

Culture is not only the history, literature, arts of a nation, but also knowledge, traditions, values, beliefs, goals, behaviour. These factors influence each other and the geography, climate, neighbours also have some effects on the culture and behaviour of the people. You may get some ideas from books, films about the country and its people, but you cannot learn these from books or on lectures.

You have to experience the general atmosphere, interaction, reaction and other behavioural habits of the people speaking the language.

You are able to distinguish the nuances of speech in Polish, you can read the facial expressions accompanying them, because you are used to it.

To be able to convey the message of foreigners faithfully, you have to learn to be able to read their intonations, gestures, habits, etc. You have to familiarise yourself with their way of life to be an effective translator and especially an interpreter.

You would have to lose your perceptions coming from looking at them with “Polish eyes”, from the outside. You should be able to immerse yourself in that culture and understand it more as an insider.

That’s why it is important to spend as much time as possible in the country of your chosen language.


 
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