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Translator Certification via Distance Learning
Thread poster: poly
poly
Italian to English
+ ...
Nov 6, 2005

I've seen bits and pieces of information in various threads about Distance Learning/Online options for those who want to earn certificates in

translation.


From my research and other posters, here's what I've found so far (graduate degrees excluded):

--------------------------------------------------------
University of Chicago Certificate in Translation
http://grahamschool.uchicago.edu/business/subprogram.cfm?subprogramid=505&forcredit=2

--Consists of 3 days of classes in-person in Chicago then 8 weeks from home/office

From the site:

PROGRAM DESIGN

A participant may choose to work on any one of the following in this program:
Translating from Chinese into English
Translating from Russian into English
Translating from Spanish into English
Translating from English into Spanish

-----------------------------------------
City University (London)Preparatory program for the Institut of Linguists (IoL) Diploma in Translation program

http://www.city.ac.uk/languages/dtdl.html

From the site:


The University offers a range of courses preparing candidates for the Institute of Linguists' Diploma in Translation. The combinations offered

are: English into French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Arabic, Polish, Russian, Turkish, and Czech; into English from French,

German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Russian.



Each cycle of courses consists of three free-standing modules, any one of which can be taken alone. Each cycle starts in January. Examinations

take place in January the following year.



All courses are based on practical translation assignments, such as past papers and papers of similar length and difficulty. Progress is

assessed from each student's individual starting point

--------------------------------

Words Language Services

http://www.wls.ie/tranbroc.htm


Offers a Certificate in Translation and an IOL Prep course , or a combination of both

From site:

Translation Language Options

French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese into English
English into French, German, Italian and Spanish
Other language combinations are currently under development

----------------------------------------


NYU Certificate in Translation
http://www.scps.nyu.edu/departments/certificate.jsp?certId=157

From site:
The certificate can be earned in one of six language pairs or in general translation: Arabic to English Translation French to English Translation German to English Translation Spanish to English Translation English to Portuguese Translation English to Spanish Translation General Translation The German to English, English to Portuguese, and Arabic to English Certificates are offered online only. The other language pairs are offered both on-site and online.



------------------------------------------------------
University of Toronto

http://learn.utoronto.ca/uoft/internationalLanguages/certificatesProfTranslation.do?method=load

From the site:


Professional Translation

Certificates in Professional Translation are offered in French, Chinese-Mandarin, Chinese-Cantonese, German, Italian, Japanese (in-class only), Korean and Spanish.

Most assignments are translations from English to the selected language.



-----------------------------------------
Has anyone tried any of these?
Are there any others?
What is or would be important to you in your selection of a program?
For those that have either a distance or traditional degree/cert in translation: does it _really_ provide an advantage when competing for work?

Let's discuss.....


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poly
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Two More Nov 7, 2005

International House, Barcelona, Spain
http://www.ihes.com/bcn/translation/introdistance.html
http://www.ihes.com/bcn/translation/ioldistance.html

Intro to Translation and IoL Dip Trans Prep Program
Eng to Spanish
Spanish to English
Spanish to French
(thanks Lia!)
-----------------------------------------
Cardiff University
http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/learn/translate/index.php
English/French only

[Edited at 2005-11-08 02:07]


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xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 14:06
Spanish to English
+ ...
useful list Nov 7, 2005

thanks:-)

I think it might depend on the diploma you prefer (US or UK?)

I opted not to do the IOL from the City of London, becuase there were strict deadlines for the submission of modules, so I did IH Barcelona, as they were more flexible.

I also used one of the others you mentioned, for a different language combination, and would NOT recommend them, as the particular tutor I had was extremely cutting, to the point of bad manners (I had my experience with the IH Barcelona tutor to compare with, he was the soul of courtesy and encouragement, thanks Mike:-)). What's more, my complaint to the office was ignored. Write to me privately and I will tell you which one.

PS The Intro to Trans at IH is for absolute novices, if you have had any experience at all, go for the IOL Prep Course

[Edited at 2005-11-07 22:01]

By teh way, are you sure it's EN-ES only? I did ES-EN there, and I have a feeling there are a few other language combinations.

[Edited at 2005-11-07 22:02]


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Noor Hussain
Local time: 15:06
English to Arabic
distance learning translation courses Feb 12, 2006

lepetitpoly wrote:
-----------------------------------------
Has anyone tried any of these?
Are there any others?
What is or would be important to you in your selection of a program?
For those that have either a distance or traditional degree/cert in translation: does it _really_ provide an advantage when competing for work?

Let's discuss.....




Yes there are others,I.ll try to post them soon


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arisuferret
United States
Local time: 08:06
Japanese to English
+ ...
online translation certification Aug 25, 2011

Greetings all.

I have been translating freelance for many years now, but have seen the job market get tighter and tighter the end result being most companies are requesting some sort of "certification". (Usually non-specified.)

The USA (where I currently live) does not have much to offer in terms of an official translation certification unless you go back to university full-time which is NOT a viable option for me.

I have turned my sights to online courses and found a few that might be good, but I was hoping to hear from others first before putting out the money.

Any recommended or not recommended online translation certification courses besides NYU?

(In general, or specifically for the language pair, JapaneseEnglish. )

Many thanks for your input in advance."


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NYU and University of Toronto Online Translation Certificate Program Feb 20, 2013

I too have been researching online programs for a translation certificate and have looked closely at NYU and the University of Toronto. Has anyone completed these programs and if you have, how did you feel about your experience with that program? Also, what are the entrance exams like for both?

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Additional information on previous post.... Mar 9, 2013

In addition to my previous post regarding the NYU and Toronto programs, I am interested in knowing what criteria do you use to evaluate programs such as these? Since my last posting, I have also come across a program offered by the University of California at San Diego. I am looking at all sorts of factors, but I would like to know what everyone else keeps in mind when selecting a program. What do you look for?

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Ninon Dion  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 08:06
Member (2013)
English to French
+ ...
Update? Aug 7, 2013

Calabrese wrote:

In addition to my previous post regarding the NYU and Toronto programs, I am interested in knowing what criteria do you use to evaluate programs such as these? Since my last posting, I have also come across a program offered by the University of California at San Diego. I am looking at all sorts of factors, but I would like to know what everyone else keeps in mind when selecting a program. What do you look for?


Did you ever get any infos Calabrese?
I'm very interested in learning more about both these programs.


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Łukasz Gos-Furmankiewicz  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 14:06
English to Polish
+ ...
See below Aug 7, 2013

Are there any such programmes that:

1. Have a realistic way of making sure you're you (e.g. webcam plus photo ID plus typing pattern recognition plus other checks perhaps),
2. Just test you, no sleeping through any classes?


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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:06
English to German
+ ...
Odd question, Łukasz. Here is how it works at the NYU: Aug 9, 2013

Łukasz Gos-Furmankiewicz wrote:

Are there any such programmes that:

1. Have a realistic way of making sure you're you (e.g. webcam plus photo ID plus typing pattern recognition plus other checks perhaps),
2. Just test you, no sleeping through any classes?



Like any other university, they know all and everything about you, from SSN to your grandmother's first name. New York University will kick you out head first if you miss two sessions per semester, as it happened to a classmate of mine who overslept and missed her class twice.

The classes for the translator certification in my language pair are too small to be held on campus. They are held via live web conferences in real time. NYU will send you the required software with serial number, head set and password. My classmates for GER>ENG (there were no classes for ENG>GER) were located in Europe, Barbados and the US. In terms of time zones, the West Coast people always get the short end of the stick, and my classes happened to start at 7 am, good grief... I DO NOT ALLOW LIFE CAMS AT 7 AM. At this ungodly hour I insist on attire fitting the time of the day, which means wrinkled pajamas.

Not sure how typing patterns should be of any significance, but whatever you type will show in real time on any PC of your classmates all over the globe. Other than that the classes consist of lectures by your prof, live audio discussions, parallel discussions in writing (in real time), and when the class is over, you receive your homework which consists of translation that will be graded mercilessly as well as reading assignments the comprehension of which will be checked in front of the class.

An anecdote: It helps a lot to figure out how to mute your mic. I once managed to holler "HONNNEEYYY, IS THERE SOME COFFEE LEFT??" at full blast and at approximately 150 db into my headset, which made the entire class burst out in laughter all over the globe and left them deaf for the next two hours.

Please do not underestimate US universities. They have nothing to do with "At your own pace" diploma mills.


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Marie-Helene Dubois  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 14:06
Member (2011)
Spanish to English
+ ...
DipTrans Aug 9, 2013

I can only comment on the DipTrans (Diploma in Translation from the Chartered Institute of Linguists) as it's the only one I know about.

The DipTrans is not an online certification. The courses to prepare for the exam can be done remotely. However, the exam requires a physical presence, although you can take them at centres (usually the British Council) all over the globe.

The exams are always on the same day (one day for into English and the other day for out of English).

The course to prepare for the DipTrans is optional. I took the DipTrans without taking a course. I just turned up for the exam. I was lucky that I passed first time although the CIoL do not encourage people to risk this as it's a costly exam and the pass rate is very low. It is also fairly gruelling because you are basically sitting in a room for 7 hours under exam conditions with only paper dictionaries (and in some cases only a pen and paper - not even a computer).

This is why there are lots of centres offering DipTrans preparation courses. None of these are "official" as such. They are only there to help people who need some support before applying for the exam, or who want to assess whether they are indeed prepared for it.
You can prepare on your own if you want by purchasing past papers and practising under exam conditions at home.

The Diploma you get when you pass the exam is actually an official qualification at level 7 (Ofqual).

My personal opinion is that it's well worth it. I have the impression that it's well-regarded in the industry and I certainly have plenty of work since I obtained it.


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Łukasz Gos-Furmankiewicz  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 14:06
English to Polish
+ ...
Thanks! Aug 9, 2013

Nicole Schnell wrote:

Like any other university, they know all and everything about you, from SSN to your grandmother's first name. New York University will kick you out head first if you miss two sessions per semester, as it happened to a classmate of mine who overslept and missed her class twice.

The classes for the translator certification in my language pair are too small to be held on campus. They are held via live web conferences in real time. NYU will send you the required software with serial number, head set and password. My classmates for GER>ENG (there were no classes for ENG>GER) were located in Europe, Barbados and the US. In terms of time zones, the West Coast people always get the short end of the stick, and my classes happened to start at 7 am, good grief... I DO NOT ALLOW LIFE CAMS AT 7 AM. At this ungodly hour I insist on attire fitting the time of the day, which means wrinkled pajamas.

Not sure how typing patterns should be of any significance, but whatever you type will show in real time on any PC of your classmates all over the globe. Other than that the classes consist of lectures by your prof, live audio discussions, parallel discussions in writing (in real time), and when the class is over, you receive your homework which consists of translation that will be graded mercilessly as well as reading assignments the comprehension of which will be checked in front of the class.


Thanks, Nicole. That's a bunch of some really good information, of which every word is valuable.

An anecdote: It helps a lot to figure out how to mute your mic. I once managed to holler "HONNNEEYYY, IS THERE SOME COFFEE LEFT??" at full blast and at approximately 150 db into my headset, which made the entire class burst out in laughter all over the globe and left them deaf for the next two hours.


Good one!

Please do not underestimate US universities. They have nothing to do with "At your own pace" diploma mills.


I don't! I have a ton of respect for American learning.

My comment came from the fact that at this stage, I'd generally feel like loading up on certificates without attending anything any more, especially not anything that could remotely put me to sleep. I barely survived the post-Master's course that used to be required of potential sworn translators here. A lot of both alcohol and caffeine was involved in enabling that survival. As far as my own pace goes, I like to cram on my own and just pass instead of adapting to an average schedule. I was a wunderkind like that when I was a boy, now I'm flying on fumes, more like, but old habits die hard. I'm happier when I can take the exam and skip the lesson. I still can't get over how many years I've wasted in the education system.

Marie-Helene Dubois wrote:

My personal opinion is that it's well worth it. I have the impression that it's well-regarded in the industry and I certainly have plenty of work since I obtained it.


I have the same impression, and I have DipTrans on my radar too. I kinda fear any sort of legal translation exam that involves non-lawyer linguists or non-linguist lawyers as graders, but as soon as I have enough cash not to worry about burning a coupla hundred quid, I'll brave it. Wonder who grades PL-EN examinations.

[Edited at 2013-08-09 16:02 GMT]


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Ninon Dion  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 08:06
Member (2013)
English to French
+ ...
For Nicole, a couple of questions Aug 27, 2013

Nicole Schnell wrote:

I DO NOT ALLOW LIFE CAMS AT 7 AM. At this ungodly hour I insist on attire fitting the time of the day, which means wrinkled pajamas.


Hi Nicole,

Does that mean that we have to be on webcam during the courses? I'm taking the admission test tomorrow, and as much I would like to enter the program, I am not fond of webcams at all.

Not sure how typing patterns should be of any significance, but whatever you type will show in real time on any PC of your classmates all over the globe. Other than that the classes consist of lectures by your prof, live audio discussions, parallel discussions in writing (in real time), and when the class is over, you receive your homework which consists of translation that will be graded mercilessly as well as reading assignments the comprehension of which will be checked in front of the class.


Do we have to participate in audio discussions? Or can students type their participation?

Thanks so much for your help.


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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:06
English to German
+ ...
Hi Ninon Aug 27, 2013

NinonD wrote:
Does that mean that we have to be on webcam during the courses? I'm taking the admission test tomorrow, and as much I would like to enter the program, I am not fond of webcams at all.


No, we didn't use webcams (not sure if they do that today, I enrolled back in 2006). Every student was supposed to upload a profile pic, though. This picture would show on the screen whenever it was the student's turn to speak, and it was nice to have a face together with the voice.

Do we have to participate in audio discussions? Or can students type their participation?


Yes, participation in the discussion is mandatory. We had discussions either per audio or per live chat but not as a mix.

Good luck with the admission test!

We had one hour to translate a really beautiful and lively written tourism text (about 500 words) and another hour to write a short essay.

Best,

Nicole


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Ninon Dion  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 08:06
Member (2013)
English to French
+ ...
Thank you Nicole! Aug 27, 2013

Many thanks for your prompt response and the good wishes!
I'm afraid my spoken english is EXTREMELY rusty, so having to speak it always makes me nervous. I live in a 100% french community, but am fluent in written english.
Always worried about sounding like an idiot

Blessing,

- Ninon


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