Magnet
Thread poster: Heinrich Pesch

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 07:40
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Nov 8, 2011

How do you pronounce this word and others with "gn" like Magnolia?

I have no knowledge of classical Greek (μάγνης), and always pronounce mag-net (the vowels of course are language-dependent). But I hear often people say mang-net, producing a nasal sound.

So I would like, am I with the majority or in the minority.

Regards
Heinrich


 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 06:40
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
As in "magnolia". Nov 8, 2011

I never say "mangnet". Sounds funny!

 

Jennifer Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:40
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Dyslexia lures, KO? Nov 8, 2011

Yes, they are pronounced mag-net and mag-nolia (and mag-nificent!).
Perhaps the people who say mang-net, etc. are dyslexic and see the letters in the wrong order ?
Jenny


 

Ty Kendall  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:40
Hebrew to English
2 syllables mæg●nət Nov 8, 2011

mæg●nət is how I'd pronounce it, with the second vowel being a schwa, as it is unstressed. The "g" and "n" are is separate syllables so a "ng" pronunciation is unlikely, unless issues of dyslexia etc are involved.

 

Emma Goldsmith  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 06:40
Member (2010)
Spanish to English
GN Nov 8, 2011

I agree with everyone: magnet is indeed pronounced mag-net.
There are exceptions, of course, such as cognac and vignette, of French origin.

Is this going to iGNite a maGNnificent and diGNified discussion? Or is it a siGNal that we're all going to aGNee for once?icon_wink.gif


 

Rachel Fell  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:40
French to English
+ ...
Nit Nov 8, 2011

I usually pronounce it more like "magnit" rather than with a schwa - but never as "mangnit".

[Edited at 2011-11-08 09:08 GMT]


 

Michael Wetzel  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 06:40
German to English
never heard mang-net Nov 8, 2011

Hello everyone,
Maybe I'll start saying "mangit" every now and then - I get a (slight) perverse pleasure out of it.

As far as Americans go, I could imagine that the people who pronounce "creek" as "crick" and "wolf" as "wuff" might occasionally also say "mangnet". That said, I really don't think that I've ever heard it. And this does not have anything to do with the Greek or other origins of the word: It is simply the pronunciation of least resistance.

Sincerely,
Michael


 

XXXphxxx  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:40
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Definitely a hard 'g' Nov 8, 2011

You may find some variance on how the vowels are pronounced but the 'g' and 'n' are definitely separate. People say 'aks' rather than 'ask'. Don't aks me why.

 

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 07:40
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
French influence ! Nov 8, 2011

Emma Goldsmith wrote:

I agree with everyone: magnet is indeed pronounced mag-net.
There are exceptions, of course, such as cognac and vignette, of French origin.

Is this going to iGNite a maGNnificent and diGNified discussion? Or is it a siGNal that we're all going to aGNee for once?icon_wink.gif


That sounds reasonable. People who know how to pronounce French try to apply this to magnet. Any French natives around who could take part?


 

Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:40
English to German
+ ...
Appalachian English Nov 8, 2011

Lisa Simpson wrote:
People say 'aks' rather than 'ask'. Don't aks me why.


Appalachian English is a common name for the Southern Midland dialect of American English. This dialect is spoken primarily in the Central and Southern Appalachian Mountain region of the Eastern United States, namely in North Georgia, Northwestern South Carolina, Southern West Virginia, Southwestern Virginia, Southern Ohio, Eastern Kentucky, the Upper Potomac and Shenandoah Valleys of Virginia and West Virginia, Western Maryland, East Tennessee, Western North Carolina, and Northeastern Alabama. It is a dialect distinct from Southern American English, and it has more in common with the Northern Midland dialect of Pennsylvania and Northern West Virginia than the Southern dialect.[citation needed] While most of this area lies within Appalachia as defined by the Appalachian Regional Commission, Appalachian English is not the dialect of the entire region the Commission defines as Appalachia. The Appalachian dialect is rhotic and characterized by distinct phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon. It is mostly oral but can also be found in writing.

"Appalachian English has long been derided as an inferior dialect. Detractors both within and outside of the speaking area mistakenly cite laziness, lack of education, and the region's relative isolation as reasons for the dialect's existence. American writers throughout the 20th century have used the dialect as the chosen speech of uneducated and unsophisticated characters. While research has largely disproven these stereotypes, use of the Appalachian dialect is still often an impediment to educational and social advancement.

Extensive research has been conducted since the 1930s to determine the origin of the Appalachian dialect. One theory is that the dialect is a remnant of Elizabethan (or Shakespearean) English that had been preserved by the region's isolation. Another theory suggests that the dialect developed out of the Scots-Irish and Anglo-Scottish border dialects brought to the region by some of its earliest British Isles settlers.[4] Recent research suggests that Appalachian English developed as a uniquely American dialect as early settlers re-adapted the English language to their unfamiliar frontier environment. This is supported by numerous similarities between the Appalachian dialect and Colonial American English.

Speakers of Appalachian English have no trouble understanding standard English, but even native speakers of other dialects can find it somewhat impenetrable (compare the similar situation of Glasgow English and London English), and foreigners may have some trouble understanding it, while others may find it easier to comprehend. Standard forms are taught in schools, with the implicit assumption that the Appalachian dialect is inferior to Standard American English. The characteristic syntax and morphology of Appalachian English gives way to more standard forms in schools, public speaking venues, and courts of law, but the phonology is likely to remain the same."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_English


 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 01:40
English to Portuguese
+ ...
The N ghost Nov 8, 2011

This may be languagewise off-topic here, but something similar happens with ONE word in Brazilian Portuguese. (I'd have no idea on European Portuguese, which, in spite of being the same language, when spoken, is extremely difficult for me to understand.)

That word is MUITO (= very, a lot). Everybody in Brazil pronounces it as "MUIN
TO", adding a nonexistent N there. Anyone pronouncing it exactly as it is written will be recognized as a foreigner who only learned the written language (or suffering from a constipated nose). Could be used as some kind of a shibboleth.

I found a quite plausible explanation on the phonetic reason for that (unfortunately, but obviously in PT) here, however a person who commits such a despicable spelling mistake ("excessões" instead of "exceções") will always be prone to have their knowledgeability challenged.


 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 06:40
Spanish to English
+ ...
Possible cause Nov 8, 2011

Emma Goldsmith wrote:

I agree with everyone: magnet is indeed pronounced mag-net.
There are exceptions, of course, such as cognac and vignette, of French origin.


Had never considered it, but Fr pronunciations like "cognac" could be the source of this foible.

But then I again, I grew up thinking that "misled" was pronounced my-zeld...


 

Suzan Hamer  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 06:40
English
+ ...
Which reminds me of a thread Nov 8, 2011

neilmac wrote:


But then I again, I grew up thinking that "misled" was pronounced my-zeld...


on an editor's list I used to keep up with. Words we've read but never heard pronounced.

For instance, when I was 15-16 I'd read the word "centrifugal", but never heard anyone say it. The first time I used it I said "centriFUgal" instead of "cenTRIfugal"....

There are others, but at the moment I can't remember any of them, and I certainly am not going to allow myself to be distracted from work to go look up that thread...

[Edited at 2011-11-08 10:25 GMT]


 

XXXphxxx  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:40
Portuguese to English
+ ...
As in 'magnétoscope'? Nov 8, 2011

neilmac wrote:

Emma Goldsmith wrote:

I agree with everyone: magnet is indeed pronounced mag-net.
There are exceptions, of course, such as cognac and vignette, of French origin.


Had never considered it, but Fr pronunciations like "cognac" could be the source of this foible.

But then I again, I grew up thinking that "misled" was pronounced my-zeld...


It could it be an example of hypercorrection.


 


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