Blog of interest to translators as well as editors
Thread poster: Suzan Hamer

Suzan Hamer  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 08:36
English
+ ...
Nov 22, 2013

I just came across this blog today and thought it might be of interest to many ProZians. "Translator" or "translating" could replace "editor" and "editing" in many of the articles. The (business) principles seem equally applicable.

http://americaneditor.wordpress.com/


For instance:
Business of Editing: One Pass, Two Pass(es)
http://americaneditor.wordpress.com/2013/11/04/business-of-editing-one-pass-two-passes/

The Commandments: Thou Shall Establish the Rules of Engagement Before Beginning a Project
http://americaneditor.wordpress.com/2013/10/30/the-commandments-thou-shall-establish-the-rules-of-engagement-before-beginning-a-project/

What is Editing Worth?
http://americaneditor.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/what-is-editing-worth/


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Françoise Vogel  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:36
English to French
+ ...
Universal consensus on perfection? Nov 22, 2013

"My book, The Business of Editing: Effective and Efficient Ways to Think, Work, and Prosper, was recently published. Its making makes for an interesting tale about the quest for perfection.

Most books are subject to three limitations: one editor (chosen from a range of experience), limited editing budget, and short schedule. In contrast, The Business of Editing had three very experienced professional editors, essentially an unlimited editing budget, and no set time by which the editing had to be completed. In other words, from an editorial perspective, it was the dream project.

If I was to present this scenario to forums that were made up of noneditors — and even forums made up of some/certain editors — the comments would be the same: the book should be “error-free,” with various meanings attached to “error.” After all, there are multiple sets of eyes looking at each word, sentence, and paragraph, looking multiple times, and no schedule pressure; consequently, “perfection” — which I assume is synonymous with error-free — should be achieved.

Alas, even with three professional editors, no schedule pressure, and no budget worries, perfection is nearly impossible to achieve.

There are many reasons why perfection is not achievable even under such “perfect” circumstances, yet I think the number one reason is that one editor’s error is not another editor’s error.

[...] there were numerous exchanges concerning language and punctuation, which are the meat of editing. Spelling is important, but a professional editor isn’t focused on spelling. True spelling cannot be ignored; whether reign is correctly spelled is important. But spelling as spelling is not the key; the key is knowing which is the right word — is it rain, rein, or reign — which is why a professional editor does not rely on spellcheckers; they know that doing so often leads to embarrassment. If the correct word is reign but the word used is rain, rain is correctly spelled — it is just the wrong word.

The “real” editorial issues are word choice, coherence, grammar/punctuation [...] I don’t recall an issue of spelling arising, although it may have; what I do recall was the discussion over punctuation and wording. It is this discussion that demonstrated to me that there can be no perfection in editing.

We were three editors with at least two, and sometimes three, different opinions. [...] It is not that one opinion was clearly wrong and another clearly right; it was, almost always, that each opinion had merit and was correct. On occasion, one opinion was more correct, but on no occasion was an opinion incorrect in the sense that there would be universal agreement among professional editors that implementing the opinion would be tantamount to creating error.

Sometimes consensus could be reached; at other times, each of us stood firm. Yet in no instance was one of us “wrong.” Which brings us back to the matter of perfection."


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