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difference between "editing" ,"proofreading"and "reviewing"
Thread poster: birdfree

birdfree
China
Local time: 09:04
Chinese to English
+ ...
Sep 8, 2014

I am a freelance translator. Some of my clients ask me to "edit" an article, and some ask me to "proofread" and some ask me to "review". I am always confused about the three terms: "editing", "proofreading" and "reviewing". What is the difference between them? And which one is higher in price?

Thank very much!


 

Alejandro Alcaraz Sintes
Spain
English to Spanish
+ ...
differences Sep 8, 2014

The following link might be helpful: http://www.bookmasters.com/blog/copyediting-proofreading-similar-yet-different/.
Regards.
Alejandro


 

Thayenga  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:04
Member (2009)
English to German
+ ...
This might interest you Sep 8, 2014

This will provide you with all the information regarding the differences / prices between the two different revision processes.

http://www.proz.com/translator-training/course/7736-the_difference_between_proofreading_and_editing


 

Rachel Waddington  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:04
Member (2014)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Ask your client Sep 8, 2014

I would ask your client to tell you exactly what they expect from you, as different people use these terms differently. They may have a set of guidelines for their checkers - some of my clients do.

 

Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 03:04
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Check with each client for each job Sep 8, 2014

This topic has been discussed several times in this forum, and will be discussed again!

Attempts have been made to set out some definitions in the Wiki on this site:
http://wiki.proz.com/wiki/index.php/Category:Art_and_craft_of_translation_and_interpreting

See more
This topic has been discussed several times in this forum, and will be discussed again!

Attempts have been made to set out some definitions in the Wiki on this site:
http://wiki.proz.com/wiki/index.php/Category:Art_and_craft_of_translation_and_interpreting

http://wiki.proz.com/wiki/index.php/Proofreading

See also under Editing.
_________________________________

However, clients do not read it!
The only safe policy is to check with each client for each job - at least until you really know what to expect.

Make sure you see the document each time too.

Clients are not always able to assess the quality of a text, and imagine that a quick spelling check and tidying up a comma here and there will be fine.

You have to use your judgement and try to reach an agreement that both parties are happy with, but it is not always easy when the client has no idea how long it really takes to check through a document, and you have to be paid for your time.

Some texts are indeed fine with a quick check, while others need extensive revision.

Even big agencies - or in my experience especially certain big agencies - will not pay realistic rates for what they call QA. I simply refuse to proofread or 'QA' for them, even if I translate for them quite happily.

Other agencies understand the importance of finding the right person for the job all the way through, and pay viable rates, so again, you have to look at each one separately.

Proofreading, editing, revising and QA mean what the client thinks they mean in each individual case!

We need to educate clients, but it is a long process.
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Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 02:04
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
In a nutshell Sep 8, 2014

This says it all really.
Christine Andersen wrote:
Proofreading, editing, revising and QA mean what the client thinks they mean in each individual case!

We need to educate clients, but it is a long process.

So, it doesn't really matter what we think we know about the terms. Until our clients are on the same page (which isn't likely to happen soon) it boils down to carefully prising out the details of the requirement, matching that with the text in hand, and only then providing a quote for the job.


 

Suzan Hamer  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 03:04
English
+ ...
Yes, as Christine said, Sep 8, 2014

discussed several times before and will continue to be.

And every time I feel compelled to contribute to the discussion by referring to my profile page where I describe my take on the differences between the proofreading and the various levels of editing. FWIW.

[Edited at 2014-09-08 23:26 GMT]


 

Sushan Harshe
India
Local time: 06:34
English to Hindi
+ ...
I have completly different view Sep 9, 2014

In my opinion, this all is same...no difference.. 25 years ago we were doing the same when we were working in printing press called it editing, 15 years ago we called it proofreading and in KPO we started calling it review/Q.A.
http://sushanhar.blogspot.in/2014/07/normal-0-false-false-false-en-in-x-none_24.html
Regards,
Sudarshan


 

Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 02:04
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
We'll have to agree to disagree Sep 9, 2014

Sushan Harshe wrote:

In my opinion, this all is same...no difference.. 25 years ago we were doing the same when we were working in printing press called it editing, 15 years ago we called it proofreading and in KPO we started calling it review/Q.A.
http://sushanhar.blogspot.in/2014/07/normal-0-false-false-false-en-in-x-none_24.html
Regards,
Sudarshan


 

Suzan Hamer  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 03:04
English
+ ...
Ditto. (Double ditto?) Sep 9, 2014

I'm with Sheila.


Sheila Wilson wrote: "We'll have to agree to disagree."

Sushan Harshe wrote:

In my opinion, this all is same...no difference.. 25 years ago we were doing the same when we were working in printing press called it editing, 15 years ago we called it proofreading and in KPO we started calling it review/Q.A.
http://sushanhar.blogspot.in/2014/07/normal-0-false-false-false-en-in-x-none_24.html
Regards,
Sudarshan


[Edited at 2014-09-09 22:29 GMT]


 

jyuan_us  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:04
Member (2005)
English to Chinese
+ ...
Editing and proofreading has become one step in many cases. Sep 9, 2014

This is because some agencies skipped the editing step and went directly to proofreading. Or we can say that editing has been incorporated into translation step or the proofreading step by the agencies, all for the purpose of keeping a larger share of the budget, of course at the risk of translation quality being compromised.


This industry has been shaped that way in the recent 10 years.


 

davies_baker
United States
Useful link - difference between ediitng and proofreading Jun 1, 2015

The following link could be useful for understanding the difference between ediitng and proofreading.
http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/editing-and-proofreading/
























...
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The following link could be useful for understanding the difference between ediitng and proofreading.
http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/editing-and-proofreading/
























editing companies
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Balasubramaniam L.  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 06:34
English to Hindi
+ ...
The difference Jun 3, 2015

Editing: You can take liberty with the translation to change it to make it more readable. You also correct grammar errors and typos. You would also compare it with source if you know the source language, but in many cases the editor may not know the source language, in which case he would just ensure that every thing confirms to logic and grammar rules and the text reads like native writing in the language.

Editng is paid by the hour. If paid by the word, it is usually about half of
... See more
Editing: You can take liberty with the translation to change it to make it more readable. You also correct grammar errors and typos. You would also compare it with source if you know the source language, but in many cases the editor may not know the source language, in which case he would just ensure that every thing confirms to logic and grammar rules and the text reads like native writing in the language.

Editng is paid by the hour. If paid by the word, it is usually about half of the translation rate.

Proof-reading: No changes to the text are made, even if it is badly done (that is the job of the editor). Only spelling and formatting issues are corrected. The proof-reader may bring to the notice of the client major issues with the text, but won't himself spent time in correcting them.

Proofing is also usually paid by the hour. If paid by the word, it is about one-fourth the translation rate.

Reviewing: In reviewing, no actual changes to the text are made. The reviewer may compare source and target. He then prepares a report about the translation in which he includes such things as, is it accurately done, has the correct terminology been used, are there too many grammar errors or typos, is the formatting right, has anything been left out, etc.

Often, with large documents, the reviewer may just work with a sample of the text and base his feedback on that.

Reviewing is usually done by senior and experienced translators or linguists, or by subject experts (if the review is specifically about accuracy of the translation). Often the reviewer would name his payment taking into account the time it takes, his experience level and expertise in the subject.
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Robert Rietvelt  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:04
Member (2006)
Spanish to Dutch
+ ...
In reality..... Jun 3, 2015

.... they (almost all) mean: 'Do what you want, but make a correct and good readable text of it' (Don't forget to charge by the hour!).

[Edited at 2015-06-03 21:52 GMT]


 
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