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Kudoz: Field (specific)
Thread poster: Heinrich Pesch

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 09:36
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Nov 7, 2014

When asking a Kudoz-question selecting this second field is obligatory (required). But selecting the most appropriate field from this long list is really taking much time and I don't see any advantage for anyone in it. So I think this field should be stripped or be made optional.

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Andrea Halbritter  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 08:36
French to German
+ ...
Agree Nov 7, 2014

... And I really often dont know what field to choose!

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Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 07:36
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
What's most important about KudoZ? Nov 7, 2014

Is it the answer?
Or is it the points attributed to the chosen answerer?

In the latter case, it's important to have the points attributed to the answerer's specialisation. It also means that those who only get notification of KudoZ questions in particular fields (e.g. their specialisations) will be notified. Although the first reason may be totally unimportant to the asker (and sometimes to the answerer as well), the second is a valid reason for specifying the field as precisely as possible. I'm sure I'm not the only one who doesn't regularly scour the list of all asked questions; I normally only react when I'm notified of a marketing/tourism question. It's also useful for the glossary, so that searchers can filter out other contexts.

On balance, I'd say that it's worth a few seconds of thought to specify a field. And editors will possibly change the field if they think you've got it wrong.


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 09:36
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Getting help Nov 7, 2014

Sheila Wilson wrote:

Is it the answer?
Or is it the points attributed to the chosen answerer?

In the latter case, it's important to have the points attributed to the answerer's specialisation. It also means that those who only get notification of KudoZ questions in particular fields (e.g. their specialisations) will be notified. Although the first reason may be totally unimportant to the asker (and sometimes to the answerer as well), the second is a valid reason for specifying the field as precisely as possible. I'm sure I'm not the only one who doesn't regularly scour the list of all asked questions; I normally only react when I'm notified of a marketing/tourism question. It's also useful for the glossary, so that searchers can filter out other contexts.

On balance, I'd say that it's worth a few seconds of thought to specify a field. And editors will possibly change the field if they think you've got it wrong.


I believe the main reason for using Kudoz is to get help. And I don't mind if someone puts forward the right answer for a question that is not his/her speciality if it only helps me forward.


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Christel Zipfel  Identity Verified
Member (2004)
Italian to German
+ ...
It's true that it is taking time Nov 7, 2014

Heinrich Pesch wrote:

When asking a Kudoz-question selecting this second field is obligatory (required). But selecting the most appropriate field from this long list is really taking much time and I don't see any advantage for anyone in it. So I think this field should be stripped or be made optional.


but this is nearly the only effort required from the asker.

Please don't take it personally (I never look at your language pair), but (too) many askers don't even bother to open a dictionary or make a research in Google before posting the question, so they can be asked at least to lose some time selecting the field.


For the rest, I agree with Sheila.


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Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 07:36
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
Don't hide your question from busier translators Nov 7, 2014

Heinrich Pesch wrote:
I don't mind if someone puts forward the right answer for a question that is not his/her speciality if it only helps me forward.

That wasn't quite the point I was making, Heinrich. I agree that you often don't need to be a specialist to give helpful input to a question. But if lots as potential answerers are acting solely on notifications, the way I am, then a higher percentage of answerers to a non-specific question would be those point-grabbers who look at every single question, sometimes hitting on the right answer but often not. You'd effectively be excluding those best able to help, as it logically must be the more experienced, well-established translators who don't have the time to open and read every question that comes up on the site.


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Walter Landesman  Identity Verified
Uruguay
Local time: 03:36
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Both sides of the equation Nov 7, 2014

Sheila Wilson wrote:

In the latter case, it's important to have the points attributed to the answerer's specialisation. It also means that those who only get notification of KudoZ questions in particular fields (e.g. their specialisations) will be notified. Although the first reason may be totally unimportant to the asker (and sometimes to the answerer as well), the second is a valid reason for specifying the field as precisely as possible. I'm sure I'm not the only one who doesn't regularly scour the list of all asked questions; I normally only react when I'm notified of a marketing/tourism question. It's also useful for the glossary, so that searchers can filter out other contexts.

On balance, I'd say that it's worth a few seconds of thought to specify a field.


I certainly agree with Sheila in all respects.

We have to look at both sides of the equation: askers and answerers. And as an experienced Kudoz user, I confirm that glossaries are a very important feature.


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Walter Landesman  Identity Verified
Uruguay
Local time: 03:36
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Agree again Nov 7, 2014

Sheila Wilson wrote:

Heinrich Pesch wrote:
I don't mind if someone puts forward the right answer for a question that is not his/her speciality if it only helps me forward.

That wasn't quite the point I was making, Heinrich. I agree that you often don't need to be a specialist to give helpful input to a question. But if lots as potential answerers are acting solely on notifications, the way I am, then a higher percentage of answerers to a non-specific question would be those point-grabbers who look at every single question, sometimes hitting on the right answer but often not. You'd effectively be excluding those best able to help, as it logically must be the more experienced, well-established translators who don't have the time to open and read every question that comes up on the site.


Ditto. Word by word.


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philgoddard
United States
Member (2009)
German to English
+ ...
Nothing wrong with point grabbers Nov 7, 2014

Sheila Wilson wrote:

...a higher percentage of answerers to a non-specific question would be those point-grabbers who look at every single question, sometimes hitting on the right answer but often not. You'd effectively be excluding those best able to help, as it logically must be the more experienced, well-established translators who don't have the time to open and read every question that comes up on the site.


I count myself as a point grabber, and it's nothing to be ashamed of. I read most questions except those that are way too technical because (a) it's a good way of maintaining my profile and getting work and (b) I enjoy it. Even if you're busy, if you like doing something, you'll make time for it.


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Elizabeth Tamblin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:36
Member (2012)
French to English
Point grabbing Nov 7, 2014

Sheila Wilson wrote:

Heinrich Pesch wrote:
I don't mind if someone puts forward the right answer for a question that is not his/her speciality if it only helps me forward.

That wasn't quite the point I was making, Heinrich. I agree that you often don't need to be a specialist to give helpful input to a question. But if lots as potential answerers are acting solely on notifications, the way I am, then a higher percentage of answerers to a non-specific question would be those point-grabbers who look at every single question, sometimes hitting on the right answer but often not. You'd effectively be excluding those best able to help, as it logically must be the more experienced, well-established translators who don't have the time to open and read every question that comes up on the site.


I've attended several webinars that have stated that it is very important for new ProZ members to accumulate as many points as possible in order to stand any chance of being found via the directory. Is it any wonder that some of us try hard to get kudoz points, even though we're not necessarily experts in the given field? After all, isn't one of the skills of a translator the ability to research a new topic and find the right terminology?


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Enrique
Local time: 03:36
SITE STAFF
On getting jobs at ProZ.com Nov 7, 2014

Elizabeth Tamblin wrote:

Sheila Wilson wrote:

Heinrich Pesch wrote:
I don't mind if someone puts forward the right answer for a question that is not his/her speciality if it only helps me forward.

That wasn't quite the point I was making, Heinrich. I agree that you often don't need to be a specialist to give helpful input to a question. But if lots as potential answerers are acting solely on notifications, the way I am, then a higher percentage of answerers to a non-specific question would be those point-grabbers who look at every single question, sometimes hitting on the right answer but often not. You'd effectively be excluding those best able to help, as it logically must be the more experienced, well-established translators who don't have the time to open and read every question that comes up on the site.


I've attended several webinars that have stated that it is very important for new ProZ members to accumulate as many points as possible in order to stand any chance of being found via the directory. Is it any wonder that some of us try hard to get kudoz points, even though we're not necessarily experts in the given field? After all, isn't one of the skills of a translator the ability to research a new topic and find the right terminology?


The webinars recommend having a clear field of specialization, to focus the KudoZ activity in that field and to get enough points to become visible (ideally to get into the top half of the same page). Once you have enough points to call the attention of the client, the defining factor should be the quality of your profile. Of course members are shown first.

Providing good answers is probably more important than getting the points, as the people working in a given field will identify those who know the subject, and it is normal to have teams of colleagues created from this mutual recognition of professionalism who share work when needed.

Point grabbing is neither advised nor needed.

Regards,
Enrique Cavalitto


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 00:36
English to Spanish
+ ...
It doesn't matter Nov 7, 2014

The field specified really doesn't matter much. I've seen so many that have been poorly classified by askers, that it becomes almost meaningless.

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Elizabeth Tamblin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:36
Member (2012)
French to English
Thank you, Enrique Nov 7, 2014

Enrique Cavalitto wrote:

Elizabeth Tamblin wrote:

Sheila Wilson wrote:

Heinrich Pesch wrote:
I don't mind if someone puts forward the right answer for a question that is not his/her speciality if it only helps me forward.

That wasn't quite the point I was making, Heinrich. I agree that you often don't need to be a specialist to give helpful input to a question. But if lots as potential answerers are acting solely on notifications, the way I am, then a higher percentage of answerers to a non-specific question would be those point-grabbers who look at every single question, sometimes hitting on the right answer but often not. You'd effectively be excluding those best able to help, as it logically must be the more experienced, well-established translators who don't have the time to open and read every question that comes up on the site.


I've attended several webinars that have stated that it is very important for new ProZ members to accumulate as many points as possible in order to stand any chance of being found via the directory. Is it any wonder that some of us try hard to get kudoz points, even though we're not necessarily experts in the given field? After all, isn't one of the skills of a translator the ability to research a new topic and find the right terminology?


The webinars recommend having a clear field of specialization, to focus the KudoZ activity in that field and to get enough points to become visible (ideally to get into the top half of the same page). Once you have enough points to call the attention of the client, the defining factor should be the quality of your profile. Of course members are shown first.

Providing good answers is probably more important than getting the points, as the people working in a given field will identify those who know the subject, and it is normal to have teams of colleagues created from this mutual recognition of professionalism who share work when needed.

Point grabbing is neither advised nor needed.

Regards,
Enrique Cavalitto


I was merely pointing out that gaining kudoz points was strongly advised in the last webinar I attended. Of course, whether or not someone is "grabbing points" is a matter of opinion. One person may see it as desperation, whereas another may perceive it as keenness and eagerness to help.


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Helena Chavarria  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:36
Member (2011)
Spanish to English
+ ...
KudoZ points have brought me a lot of work Nov 7, 2014

Elizabeth Tamblin wrote:

Enrique Cavalitto wrote:

Elizabeth Tamblin wrote:

Sheila Wilson wrote:

Heinrich Pesch wrote:
I don't mind if someone puts forward the right answer for a question that is not his/her speciality if it only helps me forward.

That wasn't quite the point I was making, Heinrich. I agree that you often don't need to be a specialist to give helpful input to a question. But if lots as potential answerers are acting solely on notifications, the way I am, then a higher percentage of answerers to a non-specific question would be those point-grabbers who look at every single question, sometimes hitting on the right answer but often not. You'd effectively be excluding those best able to help, as it logically must be the more experienced, well-established translators who don't have the time to open and read every question that comes up on the site.


I've attended several webinars that have stated that it is very important for new ProZ members to accumulate as many points as possible in order to stand any chance of being found via the directory. Is it any wonder that some of us try hard to get kudoz points, even though we're not necessarily experts in the given field? After all, isn't one of the skills of a translator the ability to research a new topic and find the right terminology?


The webinars recommend having a clear field of specialization, to focus the KudoZ activity in that field and to get enough points to become visible (ideally to get into the top half of the same page). Once you have enough points to call the attention of the client, the defining factor should be the quality of your profile. Of course members are shown first.

Providing good answers is probably more important than getting the points, as the people working in a given field will identify those who know the subject, and it is normal to have teams of colleagues created from this mutual recognition of professionalism who share work when needed.

Point grabbing is neither advised nor needed.

Regards,
Enrique Cavalitto


I was merely pointing out that gaining kudoz points was strongly advised in the last webinar I attended. Of course, whether or not someone is "grabbing points" is a matter of opinion. One person may see it as desperation, whereas another may perceive it as keenness and eagerness to help.


I enjoy the learning experience and answering questions enables me to switch off for a few minutes. And if I can help someone, all the better.

The points have brought me, and bring me, most of my work.

As for specialising in certain fields, I've always found it difficult to decide what my specialities are. I'm a classically trained dancer but I've never had the opportunity to translate anything related to ballet, music or the theatre. I'm also a philologist, as well as being an avid reader, which means I can understand any text written in my languages, and that's no exaggeration!

Thanks to my hobbies and the knowledge I have acquired over the years, I feel capable of translating texts in a great many subjects, although I only accept work I think I will enjoy, whatever the 'speciality'.


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 09:36
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Well, thank you all Nov 8, 2014

I understand now that the field is important to some of you. In my case, for a language pair like Finnish to German, if I would commit myself only to some specialities, I would have long been starved to death (or on the dole). I started out with tourism, chemistry and patents, but soon I found myself translating documents for heavy machinery I never heard of and never have seen in action etc. And Kudoz - well, if there come two questions it's a good year! And you pretty much know at the start who will answer them and get the points.

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