Certifed translator
Thread poster: Ravindra Godbole

Ravindra Godbole  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 15:27
Member (2002)
English to Marathi
+ ...
Oct 17, 2009

What does it mean actually? Who has to certify that one is a certified translator? Does each country has a different definition of Certified translator?

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Walter Landesman  Identity Verified
Uruguay
Local time: 06:57
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
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browse around Oct 17, 2009

Just take your time and search around.

You will find all the info needed in the FAQ and in the fora.

[Edited at 2009-10-17 11:54 GMT]


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 07:57
English to Portuguese
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It depends on the country Oct 17, 2009

What does a certified translation mean?

It means that the translation is widely accepted by the authorities (defined by the locally prevailing law) as complete and faithful for whatever purposes or effects a foreign document may have there.

If you'd like to know how it works in Brazil, which has laws about it, have a look at http://www.lamensdorf.com.br/faqs.html . Spain, on its turn, has a similar legislation, the key differences being that - unlike Brazil - their sworn translators don't have to be living in Spain, nor have Spanish (but any EC country as well) citizenship.

North America doesn't have such laws, so it's up to each agency where foreign documents will be submitted to decide and enforce any rules they deem fit.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 10:57
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
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Just clarifying Oct 17, 2009

Do you mean a "sworn translator" or a "certified translator"?

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Johanna Timm, PhD  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 01:57
Member (2002)
English to German
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Protected title in Canada Oct 17, 2009

In Canada, we have two kinds of translations: certified and non-certified. Certified translations are conducted by specially qualified, accredited translators who are authorized to officially sign and stamp translations as “certified”. Non-certified translations are conducted by qualified translators who do not officially sign and stamp their translations. Canadian occupational regulatory bodies, employers, colleges and universities have specific requirements that translations of documents must be “certified” which means that if your translated documents are not “certified”, they will not be accepted.
“Certified Translator” (C.T.) is a protected title in Canada. Translators may qualify for certification by 2 methods: by passing a written examination in their languages of proficiency (the examination is administered and adjudicated on a national basis by CTTIC) or by an "On Dossier" process.

More on the Canadian model here
http://shortify.com/9404
and here:
http://www.stibc.org/page/Title%20Protection%20Certificate.aspx


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:57
English to Spanish
+ ...
USA Oct 18, 2009

There are no sworn or certified translators in the USA, and the only certifications that can be obtained are for interpreters that are granted by many different states and agencies for their own official purposes only.

In my own case I am certified by the Administrative Office of the U.S. Federal Courts as an interpreter, and I never interpret in courts at any level. But I do translate numerous legal documents to be presented in courts at all levels or internationally using my certified interpreter status as credentials. It is very highly regarded because the examination is extremely selective. I get a lot of work because of it.

However, it is also true that the job description of a Federal Court Interpreter does include translation.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 10:57
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Spain Oct 18, 2009

In Spain we don't have the "certified translator" standard. We do have the "sworn translator". The distinction is given by our Foreign Office, traditionally after a very difficult exam (you needed a degree in translation or another degree to be eligible for the exam). More recently, a degree in translation from some universities and with a specialisation in legal translation gave you access to the status of "sworn translator" automatically.

The number of sworn translators who got the credential automatically was so huge that the Foreign Office is removing the scheme and going back to the exam only, also making the exam so tremendously difficult that hardly a very few translators manage to pass. Obviously they want to reduce the number of sworn translators in the market.

A sworn translator is required in Spain for court documents and many official matters. Some contracts and internal company documents are often done by sworn translators, as an additional guarantee although not required by law.


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 07:57
English to Portuguese
+ ...
What's the difference? Oct 18, 2009

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:
Do you mean a "sworn translator" or a "certified translator"?


In Brazil we are named "Public Translators and Commercial Interpreters". This stems from the fact that our translations done in accordance to the applicable law (dated 1943 A.D.) have "public faith", i.e. are acceptable by all government departments & agencies, as well as other entities, as accurate and complete.

The Commercial Interpreters title comes from colleagues in ancient times that went aboard merchant ships to languagewise mediate negotiations between the captain and local customs officers before starting to unload. Nowadays we work as interpreters mostly in civil weddings, public deeds like POAs, and in court, whenever a party does not speak our language.

The popular name for the certified professional here is "tradutor juramentado" (= sworn translator). The Sao Paulo State supervising agency has banned this title for official use, while the Parana State uses it as the main link for the corresponding directory on their web site.

Though the pertinent law is federal, supervision (including mandatory rate-setting) was delegated to state agencies (Junta Comercial = the Business Registry). So exams are statewide, and candidates must provide evidence that they have been living in the respective state for at least one year before enrolling.

The major problem here is that these exams are spread apart by 2-3 decades in each state. They don't require any specific education level, but the exams are sufficiently difficult to screen out anyone who is not throroughly qualified for the job. Some states impose a limit on the quantity of such translators within their boundaries; others don't, they just have a minimum passing score.


My impression is that a "certified translator" would be so from ATA or its alikes, and there are some countries where this is enough to make a translation officially valid. In Brazil there is certification by Abrates, but it gives the bearer nothing beyond some prestige and consequent pride; that's not enough to make a translation legally valid in Brazil.


I use the title Certified Public Translator in English to explain my assignment.

[Edited at 2009-10-18 14:25 GMT]


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