Take care of this scam that you may receive if you own a domain name
Thread poster: ahmadwadan.com

ahmadwadan.com  Identity Verified
Kuwait
Local time: 22:54
English to Arabic
+ ...
Dec 28, 2010

On Mon, December 20, 2010 1:59 pm, fnew@drc-nic.org wrote:

(If you are not the person who is in charge of this, please forward to the
right person/ department, as this is urgent, thank you.)

Dear CEO,

We are the department of registration service in China. we have something
which needs to confirm with you. We formally received an application on
17th,Dec 2010. One company called "Rx VRT Research & Development Corp" is
applying to register " ahmadwadan " as Brand name and domain names as
below:
ahmadwadan.asia
ahmadwadan.cn
ahmadwadan.com.cn
ahmadwadan.com.hk
ahmadwadan.com.tw
ahmadwadan.hk
ahmadwadan.in
ahmadwadan.tw



After our initial checking, we found the Brand name and domain names being
applied are as same as your company! So we need confirmation with your
company. If the aforementioned company is your business partner or your
subsidiary, please DO NOT reply us, we will approve the application
automatically. If you don't have any relationship with this company,
please contact us within 5 workdays. If over the deadline, we will approve
the application submitted by "Rx VRT Research & Development Corp"
unconditionally.

Best Regards

Rensis Ho


2010-12-19


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Natalie  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 20:54
Member (2002)
English to Russian
+ ...

MODERATOR
Hi Ahmad Dec 28, 2010

It appears that this scam is rather frequent:
http://tinyurl.com/347rlcd

Thank you for letting us know; I have taken action to prevent them from sending messages through ProZ.com profiles.

Natalia


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Yasutomo Kanazawa  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:54
English to Japanese
+ ...
@Natalia Dec 28, 2010

Natalie wrote:

It appears that this scam is rather frequent:
http://tinyurl.com/347rlcd

Thank you for letting us know; I have taken action to prevent them from sending messages through ProZ.com profiles.

Natalia


Excuse my ignorance, but I don't get it. Why is this a scam? What happens if you reply to the above mail (I suspect that they ARE expecting a reply from you)? Is it phishing? Sorry for all the questions.

Yasutomo


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:54
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
It is scam... and blackmail Dec 28, 2010

Yes, this is a well-known scam. Just forget about it!! The more you reply to them, the more they see that you are interested in protecting your domain, and the more they will press you and blackmail you to buy all the other domains. Just throw the message to the bin and forget about them!

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Laurent KRAULAND  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 20:54
French to German
+ ...
How it works... Dec 28, 2010

Yasutomo Kanazawa wrote:

Natalie wrote:

It appears that this scam is rather frequent:
http://tinyurl.com/347rlcd

Thank you for letting us know; I have taken action to prevent them from sending messages through ProZ.com profiles.

Natalia


Excuse my ignorance, but I don't get it. Why is this a scam? What happens if you reply to the above mail (I suspect that they ARE expecting a reply from you)? Is it phishing? Sorry for all the questions.

Yasutomo


Hi Yasutomo,
what these people basically do is registering ALL of the available business domain names they can (so they could register for example kanazawa.com.hk, if this one is available and if your domain name is kanazawa.co.jp), then to offer them to the business bearing those names at excessive prices.
The idea behind this is that businesses who care about their reputation will buy those domain names from them out of fear they could be misused by criminal third parties or by dubious entities, thus staining the bearer of the original name/brand and their reputation (not to speak about redirections).

So and as Tomás said, it is both scamming and blackmailing.

[Modifié le 2010-12-28 13:34 GMT]


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Yasutomo Kanazawa  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:54
English to Japanese
+ ...
Now I get it Dec 28, 2010

Laurent KRAULAND wrote:

Yasutomo Kanazawa wrote:

Excuse my ignorance, but I don't get it. Why is this a scam? What happens if you reply to the above mail (I suspect that they ARE expecting a reply from you)? Is it phishing? Sorry for all the questions.

Yasutomo


Hi Yasutomo,
what these people basically do is registering ALL of the available business domain names they can (so they could register for example kanazawa.com.hk, if this one is available and if your domain name is kanazawa.co.jp), then to offer them to the business bearing those names at excessive prices.
The idea behind this is that businesses who care about their reputation will buy those domain names from them out of fear they could be misused by criminal third parties or by dubious entities, thus staining the bearer of the original name/brand and their reputation (not to speak about redirections).

So and as Tomás said, it is both scamming and blackmailing.

[Modifié le 2010-12-28 13:34 GMT]


Hi Laurent,

Thanks for the detailed explanation. Seems like no holds barred in scamming people these days...


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:54
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
They threaten with registering them... but never do Dec 28, 2010

Laurent KRAULAND wrote:
what these people basically do is registering ALL of the available business domain names they can (so they could register for example kanazawa.com.hk, if this one is available and if your domain name is kanazawa.co.jp), then to offer them to the business bearing those names at excessive prices.

Well, what they do is threaten you with registering all possible domains with your name, but they never register them. That would mean having to pay for domains the will never be able to sell. So they don't register them, but they try to force you into buying them "for your protection".

Honestly, the best you can do is forget about it all and NEVER RESPOND TO THEM.


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Laurent KRAULAND  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 20:54
French to German
+ ...
It depends... Dec 28, 2010

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

Laurent KRAULAND wrote:
what these people basically do is registering ALL of the available business domain names they can (so they could register for example kanazawa.com.hk, if this one is available and if your domain name is kanazawa.co.jp), then to offer them to the business bearing those names at excessive prices.

Well, what they do is threaten you with registering all possible domains with your name, but they never register them. That would mean having to pay for domains the will never be able to sell. So they don't register them, but they try to force you into buying them "for your protection".

Honestly, the best you can do is forget about it all and NEVER RESPOND TO THEM.


It depends...

Searching for my name in the Network Solutions database, I have found some domain names are owned - and I have no clue why!


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LEXpert  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:54
Member (2008)
Croatian to English
+ ...
And if you do happen to want the domain names... Dec 28, 2010

and they're currently unregistered, can't you always register them yourself for a few dollars each at a legitimate domain name registrar? Perhaps some national top-level domains have restrictions regarding needing an address in that country (or region, as with .eu), so you can't always do it yourself.

I'm curious how this scam would work if you actually express interest in the domain name(s)? If they don't actually register them before, does the scammer then go and quickly register them for himself before you get wise?


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:54
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
They can gauge the interest Dec 28, 2010

Rudolf Vedo CT wrote:
I'm curious how this scam would work if you actually express interest in the domain name(s)? If they don't actually register them before, does the scammer then go and quickly register them for himself before you get wise?

The scammer can certainly gauge your interest in the domain: if nobody ever visited one of those domains and suddenly there are visits after sending the scam email... So it's really best to forget about it completely and not do any kind of research.


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Neil Coffey  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:54
French to English
+ ...
Scam Dec 28, 2010

Rudolf Vedo CT wrote:
and they're currently unregistered, can't you always register them yourself for a few dollars each at a legitimate domain name registrar? Perhaps some national top-level domains have restrictions regarding needing an address in that country (or region, as with .eu), so you can't always do it yourself.

I'm curious how this scam would work if you actually express interest in the domain name(s)? If they don't actually register them before, does the scammer then go and quickly register them for himself before you get wise?


Yes, if the domain isn't currently registered, then you can go to a legitimate registrar and pay a few dollars a year for it. In some countries, you don't even need to go through a registrar, but can just buy the domain directly from the domain name authority for that country/region.

What these scammers are trying to do is to con you into registering the domain through them, at hugely inflated prices, by scaring you into thinking that if you don't register the domain specifically through them, somebody else somehow has precedence over you for that domain. (In an example I've seen, the scammers were charging hundreds of dollars as opposed to the normal price of a few dollars.)


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Neil Coffey  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:54
French to English
+ ...
A related scam Dec 28, 2010

Incidentally, a related scam to be aware of if you already have a domain is that there are rogue companies called things like "The Domain Renewal Company" etc that will contact you as your domain is coming up for renewal and try to con you into thinking that they are the people that you need to renew the domain with (and again, in practice, they are a different company and will transfer the domain to them and charge you inflated prices). You should generally renew your domain through the company that you registered it with in the first place, or if you want to transfer the domain to another company, it should always be a deliberate decision and transparent that that is what you are doing.

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Laurent KRAULAND  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 20:54
French to German
+ ...
What Neil wrote... Dec 28, 2010

I have received snail mails from this company or a similar one. They are completely unrelated to the company with which I registered my domains - and yes, their prices are excessive.

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