Has anybody heard a possible scam indicating name Amila Cooper?
Thread poster: Ileana Fernandez Oakes

Ileana Fernandez Oakes  Identity Verified
United States
Member
English to Spanish
+ ...
Jan 29, 2013

Hello,

I received an e-mail looking for a English-Spanish translator.

I am kind of new at Proz.com, and I haven't received before an option like this.

I am just concerned if it might be a scam.

The first e-mail I got is:


-----------
You have been sent a message via ProZ.com.
Author: Amila
[NOTE: The author is not a registered ProZ.com user or was not logged in when sending this message.]
Author's IP address: 69.34.168.203
Message type: Request for quote
-----------

Hi,
We need a translator to translate document from English
to Spanish language.kindly get back to us so that we can
send you document to work on.
Regards.

In a second e-mail, the person indicates the details for the work and requests a quote.

This person is not asking for any MoneyGram deal, and so on as it happens in many other scam cases.
The person is providing full name, contact info. Doesn't accept payment via Paypal but sending me a check.

I just don't know. Looks legitimate, but I just still wonder if any of you have heard this name before.

Any advice will be very appreciated.

Best Regards,

Ileana


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liviu roth
United States
Local time: 22:39
Romanian to English
+ ...
the message seems to be legit Jan 30, 2013

IP is in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Before you start any work, ask for a phone # and talk to ”Amila”. If they send you a check for more than you asked, it is an overpayment scam.
Use common sense.

Good luck,
Lee


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Ileana Fernandez Oakes  Identity Verified
United States
Member
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you very much Jan 30, 2013

Thanks for your time.

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Jessica Noyes  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:39
Spanish to English
+ ...
She wrote me today as well Jan 30, 2013

Since there were so many unknowns,
I courteously informed her that I was unable to take this job. (Spanish>English.)


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 04:39
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Smells like a scam Jan 30, 2013

To me, this is scam.

Why? Your name is missing, so the same message was sent en masse to a lot of people. No full name and address, no identifiable information. Most probably a free email address in Gmail or similar, right?

Also, customer says that Paypal is not an option, and payment by check means that most probably it will be an overpayment scam.

The person and job are far too uncertain to be able to determine that this is a genuine job. It's best to report that you are not able to take the job.

Since you are new to Proz.com, you should probably go to wiki.proz.com and read about risk management: http://wiki.proz.com/wiki/index.php/Risk_management_for_translators_and_interpreters


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Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 19:39
English to German
+ ...
@Tomás: I don't quite agree on this one Jan 30, 2013

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

To me, this is scam.

Why? Your name is missing, so the same message was sent en masse to a lot of people. No full name and address, no identifiable information. Most probably a free email address in Gmail or similar, right?

Also, customer says that Paypal is not an option, and payment by check means that most probably it will be an overpayment scam.

The person and job are far too uncertain to be able to determine that this is a genuine job. It's best to report that you are not able to take the job.



Some basic research shows that the ISP address is owned by some very neat company in Nevada. Also, within the US checks are the most common way to send payments.


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Tony M  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 04:39
Member
French to English
+ ...
I agree with Tomás Jan 30, 2013

It is not very reassuring to be offered so little information from the outset; I would certainly tread cautiously here, and follow all the risk-management processes suggested.

In addition, if you now have the document, check out its plausibility; for example, previous scams have used random chunks from documents readily findable on the 'Net (and even, in some cases, already available in translation!) — and a real tell-tale sign is when even if the head of the document is OK, at the end it is simply truncated!

Personally, I received a similar request some months ago, with scant information up front; I just ignored it, assuming a scam, but subsequently discovered it was legit; however, I asked myself if in any case I really wanted to be working for an agency (in this case) who were so very unprofessional — doesn't bode well for a future business relationship!

Funnily enough, there is another 'clue' which worries me a little: the use of the syntax "to Spanish language"; this is not soemthing that a native EN-speaker would usually write, and though I do of course realize it is the sort of expression often found with non-native writers, it has to be said it is also a recurrent feature found in many scams too. Little turns of phrase like that start rining warning bells in my head.

The check payment issue: to help future readers of this thread in Europe, note that cheque payment (especially cross-border) is NOT common at all within the €uro zone, so this side of the Pond, that might definitely be taken as a bigger warning sign.


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Ileana Fernandez Oakes  Identity Verified
United States
Member
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Jan 30, 2013

Thanks to all of you for your time to provide me some advice. It is very appreciated.

So keep an eye on that name in case if you receive a similar e-mail.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 04:39
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Oh well... Jan 30, 2013

Nicole Schnell wrote:
Some basic research shows that the ISP address is owned by some very neat company in Nevada. Also, within the US checks are the most common way to send payments.

OK, but if it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck. If a customer is genuinely interested in my services, they will email again and will probably make an effort to write a proper email with the basics.


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