Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Run Studio 2009 Freelance Plus on Netbook
Thread poster: Theresa Lung
Theresa Lung  Identity Verified
Hong Kong
Local time: 23:53
English to Chinese
Aug 14, 2009

Mine is Lenovo IdeaPad S10-2 with Intel ATOM Processor N270 Single Core ( 1.60GHz 533MHz 512KB ), 2GB RAM, in Windows XP.

Office 2007 is installed.

Can anyone tell me that Studio 2009 can run smoothly @ such spec?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 17:53
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Most certainly not Aug 14, 2009

I have an old Sony Vaio with a 2 GHz Intel Pentium 4 Mobile processor, 2 GB RAM and Studio takes ages to start.
I would of course give it a try, but would really not expect any wonder.
Studio is simply "too big" for a netbook.

Best regards
Jerzy


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Claudia Alvis  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 10:53
Spanish
+ ...
One more reason to support the idea of a light and free version of Studio Aug 14, 2009

Netbooks keep getting more common everyday, so there should be a lighter version of Studio that can run perfectly (by SDL standards) on netbooks. Renato Renno proposed a satellite version of Studio, which would not only be free but also very light. You can vote for that idea here: http://ideas.sdltrados.com/ideas/detail.asp?i=2299

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Piotr Bienkowski  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 17:53
Member (2005)
English to Polish
+ ...
There are alternatives Aug 15, 2009

Claudia Alvis wrote:

Netbooks keep getting more common everyday, so there should be a lighter version of Studio that can run perfectly (by SDL standards) on netbooks. Renato Renno proposed a satellite version of Studio, which would not only be free but also very light. You can vote for that idea here: http://ideas.sdltrados.com/ideas/detail.asp?i=2299


The CAT tools should help me work faster and not make me wait. That's why I chose not to upgrade to the resource hog that Studio 2009 certainly is, and I decided to use the alternatives available on the market, both commercial and free. To be sure, there are also alternatives which are as bad or even worse, and these I won't choose.

Regards,

Piotr


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Claudia Alvis  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 10:53
Spanish
+ ...
There is a reason Aug 15, 2009

Piotr Bienkowski wrote:

The CAT tools should help me work faster and not make me wait. That's why I chose not to upgrade to the resource hog that Studio 2009 certainly is, and I decided to use the alternatives available on the market, both commercial and free. To be sure, there are also alternatives which are as bad or even worse, and these I won't choose.


I don't know what you mean by 'wait' here, but I wouldn't be using Studio if it hadn't improved my productivity. I'm sorry that some colleagues are having so many problems to the point that they can't use Studio at all, I've had my share of problems, but overall I can do more things and faster with Studio than with any other CAT tool I've tried. Like I read months ago, some translators use their CAT tools as simple add-ons to segment documents and create TMs, others use more functions based on what they need from a CAT tool, so they're happy with the alternatives. In my field, localization, Studio does a terrific job and none of the alternatives I've tried come even close.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Edric Barbosa Filho
Local time: 13:53
English to Portuguese
My Studio 2009 test on a Netbook: surprisingly good... Aug 15, 2009

Hi Theresa

I became curious about running Studio on a netbook and borrowed my daughter's, an Asus EeePC with same CPU as your Lenovo, 160 GB HD and WinXP, but with only 1 GB RAM, and installed Studio 2009. As I didn't plan to use that machine, I didn't install MultiTerm 2009.

The result of the experience was that using Studio for the job was pretty acceptable, since the really long tasks were done in batch, and I didn't need to be present. The translation process itself was very good and fast, a surprise for me considering the modest resources of the netbook PC.

I returned my production PC license to SDL and retrieved it back on the netbook. For the test, I exported a 26,000 TU memory in TMX 1.6b format from SDL Freelance 2007 and copied to the netbook an old project with 12 TTX files, totalling 20,000 words. I opened a new project on Studio for the 12 files and created a memory based on the exported TMX file.

In summary:

- Installing Studio was relatively fast (10 minutes);
- Opening Studio was very fast, but preparing the project took some time: the batch procedures lasted about 10 minutes, but I didn't need to be there;
- Importing the 26k TUs into Studio memory took about 15 minutes: the processing was fast, but after 8k TUs it stopped frequently for some background task, like indexing, resuming within a minute or two. Another batch thing that I didn't need to be around;
- The translation process in the File Editor was fine, moving up or down on the TUs, propagation included. That's really where performance counts;
- After some time I finalized the project, batch processing the tasks "Update main Translation Memories" and "Generate Target Translations": those took long, about 20 minutes to update the memory and 5 minutes to generate the target files. Considering the machine and the size and number of files, I found that acceptable.

My opinion based on that simple test is that using Studio 2009 on a netbook PC was pretty satisfactory: the translation process itself was fine. You just have to be patient when creating the translation memory and finalizing the files but, since those are batch tasks, you don't need to be around: complete the translation and leave the machine alone for some time.

I can say that the translation process in Studio is MUCH better than it was when we struggled with Freelance 2007 on Word 2007, before SDL and Microsoft worked to optimize Word's script engine and Redmond issued a Hotfix. I really don't mind waiting for batch tasks, but I cannot stand looking at a frozen screen while the application processes something in background: that never happened with Studio 2009 on the netbook.

I guess my daughter will be without her netbook if I need to travel away from my PC in a hurry...

Best regards

Edric

[Edited at 2009-08-15 15:28 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Theresa Lung  Identity Verified
Hong Kong
Local time: 23:53
English to Chinese
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Edric for you detail report! Aug 15, 2009

Your information is so helpful and I decide to upgrade right after reading your report. Though there are alternatives on the market, I still find that Trados is the most comprehensive tools for translators and want to keep an updated one.

The most attractive point for me to upgrade to plus, actually is that I can activate it on 2 PCs. I am now using OmegaT+ on my netbook. Though it is free and quite good, I have to do some convertion when I go back to my desktop. It is not so convenience yet... and therefore I am so excited when I know that I can upgrade to Studio 2009 Plus at a price with 25% off! However I know that it will not be small in size, I really concern about the performance on a Netbook.

I think SDL should also test the performance of their product on netbook as it becomes more and more common. I tried to ask the matter through the Live Chat, yet can't get a good answer.

Anyway, thanks for your report^^


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 17:53
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
This suprises me really Aug 15, 2009

as I have had performance issues with a laptop, which is much more powerfull, as a netbook. But I must admit it was the Beta Studio and things have changed dearly since that. So maybe it will be worth to give it a try.
I could imagine the following scenario: preparing a project on the desktop, moving it the for translation during travelling to netbook and then back to desktop (or a fast laptop) for post-processing. This would mean traveling with both netbook and laptop, but I dont see a problem in this - netbook is very mobile and can be used during the journey, while a laptop could be used at the destination point.
I will certainly test is once I have a netbook myself


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Edric Barbosa Filho
Local time: 13:53
English to Portuguese
Your post was useful for me, too... Aug 15, 2009

Hi Theresa

Your post made me do something otherwise I'd never try...

I really thought I could not run Studio satisfactorily on a netbook, and that was a surprise. Perhaps we got used to run so many bloated applications that we do not realize how powerful are those little machines...

Cheers

Edric


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 17:53
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Powerful machines... Aug 15, 2009

Well, of course. Thinking few years back my main PC was an Athlon XP 1700 with 2 GB RAM (or was it even only 1, I don't remember).
And we run indeed all those unnecessary things - Aero for example or other gadgets.
I'm playing around with buying a Vaio VGN-P11Z with 1,33 GHZ Atom and--unfortunately--Vista, as Sony does not offer it with other operating system. When I indeed buy this one I will test and report


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Edric Barbosa Filho
Local time: 13:53
English to Portuguese
That Vaio P is hard to resist... Aug 15, 2009

Hi Jerzy

I think Sony decided about Vista as a visual complement to the great design of Vaio P. The aging XP interface has nothing with Vaio P...

I've played with Vaio P for a while in a store, and found it pretty fast considering Vista Home Premium installed. Anyway, if I ever need such a portability, I'd check first if Sony allows the installation of Windows Seven Starter when it gets available, a much more adequate alternative... No eye candy, though, because Starter has no Aero.

Windows Seven Starter is the OS of choice for netbooks, IMHO, but it will be released only as OEM on new netbooks (or right now via Technet/MSDN for developing purposes), so I guess you should wait a while.

Or not, because Vaio P is really a thing you have to force yourself not to buy it right away: an option is taking the wife along, IF she's not a techie enthusiast. In this case you'd end up getting two....

Best regards

Edric


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 17:53
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
OT: wives and Vaios Aug 15, 2009

Well, my wife is certainly not a techie
So when it comes to buying handbags or shoes, we do not have much problems. When I need a new shirt or suit, she will not protest. But coming out with a Vaio, which I really do not need is a big problem. And TBH she is right. What for do I need a netbook?
But OTOH this is kinda toy, which I would really like to have. Oh yes, I think you already expect what comes next. And yes, this is true...









Boys don't really grow up, just their toys are becoming more and more expensive


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Maria Bogalecka  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 17:53
English to Polish
+ ...
Any new netbooks? Feb 10, 2011

Do you have any recent experience of using Trados Studio 2009 on a netbook? I'm thinking of buying a netbook for travelling that would also serve as a back-up computer, that's why I would need it to run Trados relatively smoothly. I just looked at Asus Eee PC 1215N, with an Intel Atom D525 1.8GHz dual-core processor and 2 GB RAM. Do you think it could serve the purpose? I would also appreciate any suggestions you might have, maybe you have found a netbook that works for you. Or is it a lost cause?

Regards,
Maria


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 17:53
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Have Studio on Vaio VGN-P11Z Feb 10, 2011

But if you really think about buying something for working when travelling, forget about a netbook and get yourself a notebook instead.
You will not be satisfied with the performance, because the netbook processor (this will be an Intel Atom) will not deliver enough power.
A decent and not to heavy netbook is nearly as expensive as a simple Vaio Y series, and it is definitely more powerful than any netbook, weighing just 1,7 kg. Many netbooks I've seen or had in my hand are around 1,5 kg...
Or you take Vaio Z series, weighing just 1,45 kg, but available even with an i7 processor.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Maria Bogalecka  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 17:53
English to Polish
+ ...
Thank you Feb 13, 2011

I think I'll reconsider buying a netbook.

[Edited at 2011-02-13 15:50 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Run Studio 2009 Freelance Plus on Netbook

Advanced search







SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »
BaccS – Business Accounting Software
Modern desktop project management for freelance translators

BaccS makes it easy for translators to manage their projects, schedule tasks, create invoices, and view highly customizable reports. User-friendly, ProZ.com integration, community-driven development – a few reasons BaccS is trusted by translators!

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search