When did Trados first include TagEditor?
Thread poster: Gillian Searl

Gillian Searl  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:55
Member (2004)
German to English
Sep 29, 2009

One of my customers claims that the proofreader can not process a TTX file even though they are using Trados - which made me wonder which version of Trados that would have to be?
I am of course suspecting a strong dose of "user ignorance" but anyway, when did Trados first have TagEditor - Version 5? 6? Thanks
Gillian


Direct link Reply with quote
 

avsie  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:55
English to French
+ ...
Depends on the original file Sep 29, 2009

It might be because of the original file, from which the TTX has been created. If it's a Word file, for example, version 7.1 is needed. The previous versions can't handle the file because of the absence of the Word filter.

But to answer your question, I've started to work with Trados 5.5 in 2003 and it did include TagEditor back then... but I'm sure it was included in other previous versions.

ETA: I've found this on the internet (http://accurapid.com/journal/08tools.htm):

Trados TagEditor

TRADOS TagEditor, the new add-on to Translator's Workbench for translating SGML/HTML; tagged (filtered) FrameMaker, Interleaf, and PageMaker files; or any other tagged file format..
With TRADOS TagEditor's unique translator-friendly approach, you only see what you have to translate, so you're not distracted by the original mark-up of the document.
TagEditor is a free companion to Translator's Workbench 2!


Workbench 2! That's very old

[Edited at 2009-09-29 09:47 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Laurent KRAULAND  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 00:55
French to German
+ ...
Back in 2001 Sep 29, 2009

Marie-Claude Falardeau wrote:
But to answer your question, I've started to work with Trados 5.5 in 2003 and it did include TagEditor back then... but I'm sure it was included in other previous versions.

Same here, I remember using TagEditor on Trados 5.0 back in 2001, but as the article quoted by Marie-Claude tells it, TagEditor seems to have existed earlier (I think the version used with Trados 5.0 was 2.0).


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Gillian Searl  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:55
Member (2004)
German to English
TOPIC STARTER
Yeah very old! Hate the legacy issues! Sep 29, 2009

So I updated to Studio 2009 and when asked to do a Word doc I open it and save it as a TTX. Then I open it in Studio, translate and deliver the TTX and target doc. Then the client tells me the proofreader can't read the TTX because they have an old version of Trados...

I am beginning to wonder whether it wouldn't be better to just deliver the target file and a TMX export. One of my customers uses that process - it doesn't matter which CAT tool the translator has, they just import the TMX memory and edit as appropriate.
Do you think that sounds like a better process?
Gillian


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Laurent KRAULAND  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 00:55
French to German
+ ...
Depending on the TMX version, yes Sep 29, 2009

Gillian Searl wrote:
One of my customers uses that process - it doesn't matter which CAT tool the translator has, they just import the TMX memory and edit as appropriate.
Do you think that sounds like a better process?
Gillian

I strongly advocate the use of open/"universal" formats like TMX as I cannot stand the use of proprietary formats anymore (although I have to use them sometimes). Editing a TMX seems a good idea and I would have a problem should I name a CAT tool which does not accept this format.
As per the Trados legacy issues, they have been created by SDL Trados themselves if I am not mistaken.

[Edited at 2009-09-29 11:47 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

SDL Community  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:55
English
Dealing with ttx files in Studio Sep 29, 2009

Hi all,

I thought it would be helpful if I published part of a document that has been written by the Product Manager for Studio, Daniel Brockmann, and that relates to the best practice for handling of these legacy file types.

SDL Trados 2007 featured two main ways of working:

  • When pre-translating files in SDL Translator's Workbench or SDL Trados Synergy, or when opening files for translation in SDL Trados TagEditor, the file was converted to a bilingual format for translation. This file format was referred to as TTX (TRADOStag XML).
  • When using SDL Trados Translator’s Workbench with Microsoft Word, all files were converted to bilingual Rich Text Format (RTF). If the file was in native Word .doc format, this process happened behind the scenes.

By contrast, in SDL Trados Studio, when you open a document for translation or create a project, files are converted to SDLXLIFF, a new generation of a bilingual format that is more powerful, flexible and standards-based than TTX. SDLXLIFF stands for SDL XML Localization Interchange File Format. It is an XML-based bilingual file format, specially developed for use in localization. For more information on XLIFF files, refer to http://xml.coverpages.org/xliff.html SDLXLIFF files are compliant with version 1.2 of the XLIFF standard.

Compatibility Settings for TTX
SDL Trados Studio 2009 can work with TTX using two modes, a smart tag pairing mode and a compatibility mode.
To get to this setting, with no document or project open in SDL Trados Studio, go to Tools - Options - File Types - TRADOStag - Compatibility:


Figure 1: Compatibility Settings for TRADOStag

In "smart tag pairing mode", SDL Trados Studio 2009 attempts to convert tags in the TTX in such a way that an opening and closing tag in the TTX file becomes a tag pair in SDL Trados Studio, and also attempts to preserve the semi-WYSIWYG formatting from TTX ( ). It can also happen that an opening tag in a TTX file actually does not have a closing tag in the same segment. Because this is no longer supported in SDL Trados Studio, in such cases Studio will insert an extra closing tag to ensure the integrity of all tag pairs.


Figure 2: Tag pairs in TTX after opening a file in Studio using Smart Tag Pairing Mode

This smart tag pairing approach will work in most cases, providing for more user friendly translation of TTX files. However, in rare instances, the back conversion of TTX files manipulated in this way may fail. If this is the case, it is recommended to activate the compatibility mode for TTX as depicted above. In this mode all tags from the TTX files become placeholder tags (see picture below) during translation in SDL Trados Studio, so each tag in the TTX file will correspond to exactly one tag in Studio, with no extra tags inserted. Moreover, formatting from the source file will not be shown in Studio. This approach ensures the maximum possible tag integrity and maximum legacy support for TTX:


Figure 3: Compatibility mode for TTX files using placeholder tags and no formatting

Before you start work on TTX files, it is useful to test TTX compatibility by doing a "dummy" translation of a representative TTX file from your project. To do this, copy all source segments to target in Studio (Alt+Shift+Ins), then use the Save As Target command in Studio to produce both a "translated" version of the TTX file and also a target version of the original file format from the TTX (referred to as "Original File"). This works for all file formats that are supported in SDL Trados 2007, including customisable file formats such as XML or SGML. In the latter case, it is important to ensure that you have access to additional files that are needed for smooth translation, such as tag settings files (.INI).


Figure 4: Options for saving TTX as target
If saving both output file formats (TRADOStag document and Original File) is possible, you can use smart tag pairing mode. If not, use the compatibility mode.


I hope this explains a little how to work with ttx files in Studio and avoid some of the problems you could run into.

Regards

Paul
SDL Support


[Edited at 2009-09-30 04:41 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Textklick  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:55
German to English
+ ...
XLIFF - Blind link Sep 29, 2009

SDL Support wrote:

It is an XML-based bilingual file format, specially developed for use in localization. For more information on XLIFF files, refer to http://xml.coverpages.org/xliff.html. SDLXLIFF files are compliant with version 1.2 of the XLIFF standard.


Try: http://xml.coverpages.org/xliff.html

It's the incorrect fiddly bits that irritate translators.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

SDL Community  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:55
English
Should have used QA Checker ;-) Sep 30, 2009

Textklick wrote:

It's the incorrect fiddly bits that irritate translators.



Thanks for spotting that, I corrected it.

Regards

Paul
SDL Support


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

When did Trados first include TagEditor?

Advanced search







Across v6.3
Translation Toolkit and Sales Potential under One Roof

Apart from features that enable you to translate more efficiently, the new Across Translator Edition v6.3 comprises your crossMarket membership. The new online network for Across users assists you in exploring new sales potential and generating revenue.

More info »
Anycount & Translation Office 3000
Translation Office 3000

Translation Office 3000 is an advanced accounting tool for freelance translators and small agencies. TO3000 easily and seamlessly integrates with the business life of professional freelance translators.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search