Bak file
Thread poster: Libero_Lang_Lab

Libero_Lang_Lab  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:29
Member (2006)
Russian to English
+ ...
Dec 30, 2009

Hi there

Another cry for help from a Trados novice.

I've completed a translation in Trados 2009 Freelance Studio, which I purchased along with Trados 2007.

I can export the target document into word. I was also asked for the 'bilingual file' - ie source and target texts, which is saved in my SDL project folder. However it appears this is a dat file not a bak file. Can someone explain to me how I create the required bak file, or where I locate it if it is created automatically?

Many thanks,

Dan


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:29
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
You do not have a bak file, neither can you create one in an easy way Dec 30, 2009

You must understand the main difference between bilingual files created in Word, which would create a bak file when cleaned, and the process in Studio.
While bilingual Word files remain doc files, where both source (specially formatted) and target text is saved in the same file without changing the data format (ie a doc file remains a doc), SDL Studio does use a special format for saving bilingual data from any source format.

To put things straight: working with Studio means always creating a new special file for translation, where the source and target are kept within a dedicated data structure.
How the whole process works:
Let us leave terminology aside for the beginning in order not to make things to complicated.
As you are using a CAT program, you aim on creating a translation memory.
So the translation process starts with an empty translation memory and a source file. You open the source file in Studio and assign a translation memory. After the file has been opened you press the "Save" button. What you have now is a file in SDLXLIFF format, an intermediate format for translation. The original source file however remains untouched on your HDD. After the translation is done you have: a translation memory containing the text from the translated file in source and with corresponding target sentences AND a translated bilingual file in SDLXLIFF format. This one would have been the "BAK" you mention. However, only user of Studio can have some use of it. For user of old Trados 2007 it is worthless. You can now create a target file and also export the content of the translation memory to an exchange format called TMX.

Now in order to make your customer happy (and yourself too by not adding any additional work to what you've done already) you can provide him the target file and the translation memory export as TMX. Should they moan, you would unfortunately need to retranslate the file. Before you do that, ask them, if they would accept a TTX bilingual file - in that case your additional work will not be very hard. If the answer is yes, please:
- start Workbench
- create a translation memory with the necessary language pair
- start Tageditor (SDL International programm group, there inside is TagEditor - a separate small program)
- with the command "File - open" open the source file (bear in mind, that Tageditor is by default looking for *.ttx files, so you need to change the file type for "all files *.*) there (best solution) to be able to open any file); you can also use drag&drop and drag the file on the Tageditor window and drop it there
- now in Tageditor press CTRL+S in order to save the file; this will result in a *.ttx file
- go to Studio
- with File - Open open the newly created ttx file, assign the same translation memory you used before and retranslate the file
- now with "Save target as..." create the final ttx AND the target file
so far you're done

Should they insist in Word, repeat the creation of a new translation memory in Workbench. In Studio export the content of your TM to a tmx file. In Workbench import this content to your empty TM you just created (menu File - Import).
Start Word and retranslate the file there. Have fun


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Libero_Lang_Lab  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:29
Member (2006)
Russian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
phew! Dec 30, 2009

Jerzy Czopik wrote:

You must understand the main difference between bilingual files created in Word, which would create a bak file when cleaned, and the process in Studio.
While bilingual Word files remain doc files, where both source (specially formatted) and target text is saved in the same file without changing the data format (ie a doc file remains a doc), SDL Studio does use a special format for saving bilingual data from any source format.

To put things straight: working with Studio means always creating a new special file for translation, where the source and target are kept within a dedicated data structure.
How the whole process works:
Let us leave terminology aside for the beginning in order not to make things to complicated.
As you are using a CAT program, you aim on creating a translation memory.
So the translation process starts with an empty translation memory and a source file. You open the source file in Studio and assign a translation memory. After the file has been opened you press the "Save" button. What you have now is a file in SDLXLIFF format, an intermediate format for translation. The original source file however remains untouched on your HDD. After the translation is done you have: a translation memory containing the text from the translated file in source and with corresponding target sentences AND a translated bilingual file in SDLXLIFF format. This one would have been the "BAK" you mention. However, only user of Studio can have some use of it. For user of old Trados 2007 it is worthless. You can now create a target file and also export the content of the translation memory to an exchange format called TMX.

Now in order to make your customer happy (and yourself too by not adding any additional work to what you've done already) you can provide him the target file and the translation memory export as TMX. Should they moan, you would unfortunately need to retranslate the file. Before you do that, ask them, if they would accept a TTX bilingual file - in that case your additional work will not be very hard. If the answer is yes, please:
- start Workbench
- create a translation memory with the necessary language pair
- start Tageditor (SDL International programm group, there inside is TagEditor - a separate small program)
- with the command "File - open" open the source file (bear in mind, that Tageditor is by default looking for *.ttx files, so you need to change the file type for "all files *.*) there (best solution) to be able to open any file); you can also use drag&drop and drag the file on the Tageditor window and drop it there
- now in Tageditor press CTRL+S in order to save the file; this will result in a *.ttx file
- go to Studio
- with File - Open open the newly created ttx file, assign the same translation memory you used before and retranslate the file
- now with "Save target as..." create the final ttx AND the target file
so far you're done

Should they insist in Word, repeat the creation of a new translation memory in Workbench. In Studio export the content of your TM to a tmx file. In Workbench import this content to your empty TM you just created (menu File - Import).
Start Word and retranslate the file there. Have fun


thanks jerzy! so much to learn, so little time... really appreciate the idiot's guide. let's see where it gets me!


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Sergei Leshchinsky  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 22:29
Member (2008)
English to Russian
+ ...
bak... Dec 30, 2009

is a good old ... backup copy of your file... actually, it is the previous version of file (in ANY APPLICATION) after any saved change or "save as" operation...

(When did you buy you first PC? Buy some books...)

[Редактировалось 2009-12-30 21:49 GMT]


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:29
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
bak... Dec 30, 2009

was what you claim it to be in the very old past.
Since at least Word 97 we do have wbk files instead, when it comes to keeping a backup copy of those. A bak is created only in the process of cleaning of Word files in the Workbench.
Of course I am reffering here only to the part concerning Trados.
Also many other programs do create backup copies of files when saving them, but they not always use "bak" as file extension.
I am also afraid, that this part of knowledge is not covered by many books.


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Libero_Lang_Lab  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:29
Member (2006)
Russian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
books Dec 30, 2009

Sergei Leshchinsky wrote:

is a good old ... backup copy of your file... actually, it is the previous version of file (in ANY APPLICATION) after any saved change or "save as" operation...

(When did you buy you first PC? Buy some books...)

[Редактировалось 2009-12-30 21:49 GMT]



thanks sergei - at this stage in proceedings your irony/sarcasm is wasted on me.

to answer your questions: i own a lot of books. on a good day, i can even read them if they have large print.
i bought my first pc in 1995.

s nastupayushim...


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Libero_Lang_Lab  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:29
Member (2006)
Russian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
thanks again jerzy Dec 30, 2009

Jerzy Czopik wrote:

was what you claim it to be in the very old past.
Since at least Word 97 we do have wbk files instead, when it comes to keeping a backup copy of those. A bak is created only in the process of cleaning of Word files in the Workbench.
Of course I am reffering here only to the part concerning Trados.
Also many other programs do create backup copies of files when saving them, but they not always use "bak" as file extension.
I am also afraid, that this part of knowledge is not covered by many books.



thank you for the walkthrough guide. i guess i've now recreated the translation having previously attached an empty tm to the source file in studio. so hopefully if i now send this to the client it will give them what they need.


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Libero_Lang_Lab  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:29
Member (2006)
Russian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
workbench Dec 30, 2009

am i right in thinking that for workbench i need to be in trados 2007 not trados studio 2009?

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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 21:29
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Yes you are Dec 30, 2009

Dan Brennan wrote:

am i right in thinking that for workbench i need to be in trados 2007 not trados studio 2009?


While Studio is a "closed" program and you can do the complete translation process within there, SDL Trados 2007 (also called Suite) consists of several smaller parts.
To be able to translate with T2007 you need the Workbench, which takes care for the translation memory (and for us, while we use Studio, only for TM), and a text editor - which may be Word or Tageditor.

To work in Studio, but keep compatiblity with customers still on Trados 2007:

  • use Workbench to create a translation memory with the desired language pair or to open such existing translation memory (which will remain empty)
  • in Workbench go to Options - Translation Memory Options - Tools and make sure, the "TRADOStag XML workflow for Word .doc files" option is selected and press OK
  • still in Workbench go to Tools - Translate, make sure the option "Segment unknown sentences" is selected
  • Either using the "Add..." button or per drag&drop add the files you want to prepare for translation
  • press "Translate", this will create presegmented ttx files
  • change to Studio
  • open the presegmented ttx file or create a project for multiple files
  • assign the desired tm
  • after you open the file for translation in Studio go to Translate menu and chose "Delete all segments in draft status" (or similar, this is my humble translation from my German GUI) or press simply "CTRLSHIFT+DEL", this will remove the unwanted text on the target side
  • translate the file (files), save as target, but remember to save both as ttx and target format


Deliver the ttx and target files to your customer - he should be happy with those. If he is, you should be happy too


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