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What are 'project files' and why does Trados Studio 2009 create them?
Thread poster: carl01

carl01
German to English
Jul 25, 2010

Hello,

I've just started using Trados Studio 2009. This is the first time I've used any version of Trados, and I've got a few initial questions that someone may be able to help me with.

For test purposes, working from German to English, I started with a Word file called 'German'. After entering the translated text in English, I saved the file as 'English'.

I was then surprised to see that apart from this XLIFF (bilingual) file, the system had automatically created an 'SDL Trados Studio Project File', named 'English'. What is this for? If I shut everything down and click on it, it only seems to open Studio again.

The system also created a folder called 'English.ProjectFiles', containing a sub-folder ('File Types') with 36 files. What are these for? Do I need to keep them for any reason after finishing a job? I'm used to ending up with just 2 files - source and text - so I'm wondering why I've ended up with so many files now.

Many thanks for any help!


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:01
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Project files contain all project settings Jul 25, 2010

When you open a file in Studio, a certain filter is used and some settings are applied.
These are stored in the file types folder and project file.
In principle you could delete all those additional informarmation after your translation is ready, but this will leave you without an easy way to return to your translation in the future.
The best way is to keep the files even when you're done.
When working with Studio you should remember, that this software is treating even a smallest single file as a project - due to the concept.
So when you opened a file and started the translation you do not return to this translation after having closed Studio by opening the file itself again or even by opening the bilingual file, but through the Files view within Studio. So instead of using the commang "File - Open" switch then to Files view and open the file for translation (or for review/sign-off) from there.
In fact my recommended way of working with Studio is using project templates and creating projects for evey job I do.


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SDL Community  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:01
English
Another good way for some users is ... Jul 25, 2010

... to create Projects for each of your Clients, or one for small odd jobs for example so that you have everyhing set up just once the way you like it. This works well for small one or two file jobs as you just add the files to the existing Project as they come in and then you don;t replicate the project settings all over the place.

Using Projects does of course have its advantages, but for smaller jobs where you have only received a few files this works well for many translators I speak to. The Project Templates idea is good though, or even basing the Project on one you did earlier, and makes it pretty fast to set up a new Project too.

Regards

Paul


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:01
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Advantages of projects Jul 25, 2010

I really do create projects out of templates (which in fact are nothing else as a mirror pictures of previous projects for that particular type of the job) even for the smallest single files I get.
Only for tiny files it is a longer process, for evertyhing else it is faster - but for all files it is the most convenient way.
The more you learn Studio the more you will be confronted with dozens of settings, some of them with very minor and some of huge impact on what is being treated how and how are your results. So instead of keeping all those settings in mind you just create a project with all necessary settings (need to go through all of them once), then save it as a template and reuse for the next time. Then your project is ready with really few clicks.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:01
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
One "advantage" of projects Jul 25, 2010

You can be sure that your hard disk will be packed with useless files, as commented in this forum. About 2.8 MB of useless files are created with each project, want it or not, and just you dare delete any file to make room in your disk.

I sincerely hope SDL have fixed this in Studio 2009! The topic was from March.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:01
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Every job will have 2.8 MB of files Jul 25, 2010

Jerzy Czopik wrote:
When you open a file in Studio, a certain filter is used and some settings are applied.
These are stored in the file types folder and project file.
In principle you could delete all those additional informarmation after your translation is ready, but this will leave you without an easy way to return to your translation in the future.
The best way is to keep the files even when you're done.

Indeed. The best is to let Studio 2009 create 2.8 MB of useless filters for every 5-KB file you translate...

How many projects can a translator have in a year? A quick guess is some 3-4 projects a day (of different sizes of course). Working 250 days a year, this for example means some 1,000 projects a year... i.e. nearly 3 GB of useless files to add to your backup. If you keep archives for several years on-line, just count 3 GB of useless filter files per annum.

This all would be hilarious if it was not a terrible thought!

I sincerely hope the guys at SDL sit down, relax, and admit that this was terrible design and start fixing it at once.


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SDL Community  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:01
English
Your choice of how to work Jul 25, 2010

Hi Tomás,

The choice of what you archive, how you want to work is entirely yours. I think if you wanted belt and braces you could take Jerzys approach and create Project templates and then after the project is finished you could really delete everything apart from your bilingual files, your project templates and your TM. Why would you want to archive anything else?

Paul


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carl01
German to English
TOPIC STARTER
Project files Jul 26, 2010

Thank you for the replies.

I've tried deleting all of the extraneous files and keeping only the xliff file, and this still opens exactly what I just translated. So I'm still slightly at a loss to understand why I need to keep dozens of other files - especially as, as someone pointed out, my hard drive would soon keel over under the weight of all these files. What are these 'settings' that would be jeopardised by deleting all this stuff?

I'm just trying to keep things as simple as possible - I only work for half a dozen agencies, and translate basic Word files 90% of the time. Nearly every job I do is different from the last so I don't even have any particular need to distinguish between clients with filters or whatever.

Many thanks again.


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:01
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Price per GB Jul 26, 2010

TBH I do not really understand where the problem is - a GB HDD space is about 10 cent nowadays, so your additional 3 GB of space will cost me 0,3 Euro per year.
This is next to nothing. And if the HDD is full I buy another one or make space free.
Whatever way I chose this is not a problem.
OTOH nearly every newer format is bigger than its predecessor - look for Word files for example. Word 2.0 were tiny compared with Word 2003.
HDD space is something I would not really take into accout compared with the convenience of work.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:01
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Reusable projects? Jul 26, 2010

SDL Support wrote:
The choice of what you archive, how you want to work is entirely yours. I think if you wanted belt and braces you could take Jerzys approach and create Project templates and then after the project is finished you could really delete everything apart from your bilingual files, your project templates and your TM. Why would you want to archive anything else?

Thanks Paul. Indeed this is a suggestion.

I think however that in this case the time spent creating projects would be lost time. Wouldn't it be much preferrable to be able to create a project for a customer and reuse it, thus feeding it translatables and getting out bilinguals and cleaned deliverables, deleting the translatable files once that project is finished? That would mean one single set of filter files and less fuss --or no fuss-- with useless filter files.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:01
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Yes, there's plenty of room in the ocean! Jul 26, 2010

Jerzy Czopik wrote:
TBH I do not really understand where the problem is - a GB HDD space is about 10 cent nowadays, so your additional 3 GB of space will cost me 0,3 Euro per year.
This is next to nothing. And if the HDD is full I buy another one or make space free.
Whatever way I chose this is not a problem.

Indeed. When councils along the coast have enough rubbish, they should just dump it in the ocean! It's so big!

Now, seriously: multiplying the size and number of files of each translation project by 200 just because of bad design does not make any sense. You know it. Everybody knows it... or will know it in their backup and archive times grow exponentially along time compared to their previous version of Trados. I just have to sit and wait for forums by displeased users about this matter.


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SDL Community  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:01
English
Funny you should say that Jul 26, 2010

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:
I think however that in this case the time spent creating projects would be lost time. Wouldn't it be much preferrable to be able to create a project for a customer and reuse it, thus feeding it translatables and getting out bilinguals and cleaned deliverables, deleting the translatable files once that project is finished? That would mean one single set of filter files and less fuss --or no fuss-- with useless filter files.


Well, the use of the Project Template you saved would make the creation of the project again very simple. However, if you wanted to reuse the project then you wouldn't be recreating these files anyway would you?

As I pointed out earlier this is a perfectly valid way of working and many users do this anyway. If you only had one client for your work you could, if you wanted to, have only one project and use this ad infinitum. Funnily enough it sounds just like your suggestion

The drawback of course would be software updates as enhancements to the software, in particular filters, would only take effect when you recreated your project because we use the concept of project specific settings.

I guess its horses for courses and there a number of ways to work with the software. But I agree that it would be better if we didn't copy all the filetypes over all the time for new Projects. I'm sure this will improve in time.

Regards

Paul


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Emma Goldsmith  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:01
Member (2010)
Spanish to English
Projects don't have to have that many file types Jul 26, 2010

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

multiplying the size and number of files of each translation project by 200 just because of bad design does not make any sense.


You can decide which file types to include when you create a project. When the project is up and running you can modify the file types included.

My general template for creating a project only has Office file types, XLIFFs, TTXs and not much else. There are about 10 or so, not 200. As Carl01 says, only one file type is needed for one file and the rest can be deleted.

My workflow is just as you suggest, Tomás. I have a running project for each client (I have about 8 on the go at present). When I get a new file for translation I simply add it to that client's project. That way I know that I will be using the right TM, database and autosuggest dict for that client. There is no set-up involved at all, and absolutely no extra file types being added to my hard disk.

It's a very simple, efficient method.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:01
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
At last! Jul 26, 2010

SDL Support wrote:
I guess its horses for courses and there a number of ways to work with the software. But I agree that it would be better if we didn't copy all the filetypes over all the time for new Projects. I'm sure this will improve in time.

That's basically all I needed to hear Paul! I am glad you realize that. Thanks a lot for all the comments!


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:01
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Simple and efficient Jul 26, 2010

Emma Goldsmith wrote:
My workflow is just as you suggest, Tomás. I have a running project for each client (I have about 8 on the go at present). When I get a new file for translation I simply add it to that client's project. That way I know that I will be using the right TM, database and autosuggest dict for that client. There is no set-up involved at all, and absolutely no extra file types being added to my hard disk.
It's a very simple, efficient method.

Indeed this kind of setup is what I experience as most efficient. In our case, we reuse over 100 different projects at the moment (in MemoQ though), and never have to create the same project twice. We can easily hide/unhide the projects we use less or only several times a year, but the ones we use on a daily basis are always visible. When we receive a new file from one particular customer/end customer combination, we are ready to translate in seconds, with all the right resources (quality settings, terminology, non-translatables, secondary TMs, secondary TBs... etc. etc.) there immediately.


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