Upgrading to Studio in the middle of a large project?
Thread poster: Susanne Lomander

Susanne Lomander  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 09:55
Swedish to English
+ ...
Mar 10, 2011

Hi!

I have SDL 2007 Freelance (8.2.0.835 Build 835) and Multiterm 7.5.0.444 (Build 444) installed on an old XP computer, as well as my old 2006 as backup), and just never got around to upgrading to Studio 2009 when it came out because of all the negative feedback I heard (and still hear...) when it came out. I usually try to wait a year or two before I upgrade, so that SDL Trados can fix all the bugs in the new version. But since no one ever demanded it, I guess I just forgot to upgrade later on.

Now I have a 100 000+ project, where the documents are originally created in Adobe InDesign CS4, but the client has provided me with source documents in indd, xml (empty), inx, PDF and .doc formats. I have started translating using just Workbench and Word 2000 (which works best with Freelance 2007, for me), as they want me to keep the translation short enough to fit on the same number of pages. I know it's not ideal, but this way I can see what the translation will look like in Word, and figure out where to shorten the text.

However, because of formatting issues, the customer would love for me to work with the original InDesign files or formats, instead of doc format exported from PDF, so that it's easier for them to input the final version into InDesign.

So I am wondering if Translation Studio 2009 would in any way be better for such a huge project? However, I am worried about all kinds of installation problems, time spent learning the software, bugs and errors and other nightmare scenarios. Also, will it require me buying a new more modern PC (which I was planning on doing AFTER the assignment anyways, but preferably not now...)

What would be the pros and cons of switching to Studio at this point? I tend to think it's better to work with something you know well, and not change horses in mid stream, but does anyone have experience with Studio 2009 to tell me whether it actually could improve the workflow?

Thanks!!


 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:55
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Use INX files! Mar 10, 2011

But my friend, as far as I am aware, Trados 2007 (well, TagEditor) does open INX files, i.e. files exported from InDesign. If you have never used TagEditor, it is about time you started to use it. Yes, you will have to deal with tags, but it is far more stable than translating in Word and will let you open and process many more source file formats.

It is as simple as asking your customer to save their source files as INX files, open them in TagEditor and work with them as TTX files. Once the TTX file is finished, you can save as INX and your customer only needs to open the INX file and save as INDD again.

The process is quite proven now and I think it would be the solution for you.

Personally I would NOT switch to Studio right now, since you are bound to find problems and will need time to resolve. It's best to complete your project in a stable situation and do the change to a new tool in a quieter period.

Good luck!


 

Andreas Oster
Germany
Local time: 09:55
English to German
Different workflow Mar 10, 2011

Hi Susanne,

One mayor point to consider is that the workflow and the user interface (and even the shortcuts) are considerably different. This will take some time to get used to. On the other hand a 100 000+ project is a good opportunity to get used to a new software.

You will have to convert your TM to the new format and you might get a lot of fuzzy matches due to different tagging when changing from Word to InDesign formats.
As far as I know the preview function for Office formats does not work with Office 2000.

As for the installation problems and bugs, most of them should have been solved with SP3.
I made this change last year and installed Studio 2009 on an old XP system at first. It worked OK, only starting the program or opening a file took ages.

After getting used to it I would say I prefer Studio 2009 to the TagEditor, but not necessarily to translating with the Workbench in Word (but Trados 2007 is included anyway).

Andreas


 

Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:55
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
No upgrade in the middle of a project! Mar 10, 2011

Regardless all circumstances the upgrade will bring you only trouble.

 

Laurent KRAULAND (X)  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 09:55
French to German
+ ...
Critical Mar 10, 2011

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

(.../...)

Personally I would NOT switch to Studio right now, since you are bound to find problems and will need time to resolve. It's best to complete your project in a stable situation and do the change to a new tool in a quieter period.

Good luck!


I would even say it would be critical to switch to Studio right now when an alternative workflow is available through Trados 2007.


 

Susanne Lomander  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 09:55
Swedish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Problem with TagEditor and inx files Mar 10, 2011

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

But my friend, as far as I am aware, Trados 2007 (well, TagEditor) does open INX files, i.e. files exported from InDesign. If you have never used TagEditor, it is about time you started to use it. Yes, you will have to deal with tags, but it is far more stable than translating in Word and will let you open and process many more source file formats.

It is as simple as asking your customer to save their source files as INX files, open them in TagEditor and work with them as TTX files. Once the TTX file is finished, you can save as INX and your customer only needs to open the INX file and save as INDD again.

The process is quite proven now and I think it would be the solution for you.



Thanks for all your suggestions!

I already know how to use TagEditor (at least, for pretty basic stuff) and use it for html and other files. The problem using INX file was threefold:

1) When proofreading my translation prior to delivery, the target file just looked like jibberish to me, which made my "final" proofreading "read-through" stage more unreliable (having to review it in the TagEditor bilingual Edit window rather than actually reading a nice, formatted Word document with continuous flowing text)

2) The client wanted the translation file to mirror the source file formatting, and since it's a book with layout, we both thought working via Word might not be ideal, but it will allow them to see pretty much a mirror image of each page with formatting AND edit using Track Changes, even though they have to manually input the final version into InDesign..

3) The client isn't used to working with any other formats in InDesign other than INDD, and had to read up on how to export the contents (that's why all the xml versions were actually empty...). I thought that it might just worry them if we used a new format - INX - that neither of us have any experience with, or a new format and workflow that we don't really have a grip on...

So I have the INX files and TagEditor... but have no experience of INX files..!icon_frown.gif

Would working with INX be safer for the end result (ie maintain formatting more closely), be easier for the client to input AND easier for all of us to review (proofread an edit) during the process?

I agree that changing to Studio is not the right time, but it's not to late to start working with INX, if that won't cause any problems...

Thanks for any and all input!


 


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