Migrating from SDLX to SDL Studio 2009 - The CAT Tools Specialist point of view
Thread poster: WhoisBatman
WhoisBatman
Local time: 07:31
Mar 24, 2011

Good day !

I don't know if anyone can answer this question (i know SDL is monitoring this forum, so who knows), but here's goes nothing;

I'm a CAT Tools specialist, i know SDL Trados 2007 like the palm of my hand, i've been working with SDL/Trados tools since 2000 and when i open up SDL Studio 2009, all i see is a tool made to TRANSLATE.

For every tasks that i was able to do in a matter of seconds before has become a flow of questions and windows to fill and an endless clicking of "Next" until i can actually launch the task needed.

You just want to analyse some files ? In SDLX, it was a walk in the park; open the Analyse Module, drag&drop the source file, add the TM(s), enter a log file and Analyse, you're done in under 15 seconds. Doing the same thing in SDL Studio 2009 is a real pain in the ....

Everything can be done in a matter of seconds with SDLX.

And don't get me started with the Project Wizard. It was so easy to analyse & pretranslate a bunch of files with SDLX. That piece of software was optimized to the max and was so easy to use for us...

So my question is this: Will SDL think of all the CAT Tools Specialist out there and build a tool pack made for the power user that need to prepare a lot of files everyday that just don't have the time to deal with the slow process of SDL Studio ? I have to prepare a lot of files each day and SDL Studio 2009 is just not optimized to deal with that kind of workload right now.

There was so many great things that are now gone with the new version. Project Wizard (the GOOD one, not the bloatware included in 2009), Compare, Utilities, Update, all gone...

The only thing i can see that is better, compared to SDLX or TagEditor, is the window where the translation is done. When we will eventually have to migrate to Studio someday, the translators will love it, but every other (power) task takes too damn long to get done quickly. And again, i speak from a CAT Tools specialist point of view here, not from a translator point of view.

So, who can answer this ?
SDL ?


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Soonthon LUPKITARO(Ph.D.)  Identity Verified
Thailand
Local time: 19:31
Member (2004)
English to Thai
+ ...
Stages of software development Mar 25, 2011

After a year of experience with Studio 2009, I find that it is an incomplete CAT tool: many and many bugs and repeating service package updating. Trados tries to keep pace with latest target application versions e.g. InDesign, MS Office. Trados is in a rush and never incorporate goodies of T2007 into its T2009 version. This is both a product feature and professional ethic issue.

Yet, T2009 has its strong points e.g. versatility of TM, few crash against TagEditor files, convenient and handy TM processing.

Soonthon Lupkitaro


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Stanislav Pokorny  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 14:31
English to Czech
+ ...
Well... Mar 25, 2011

...for me it's a matter of priorities. While I admit that going through the entire project creation process to analyze two files is a pain in the ****, there are countless improvements compared to previous versions of Trados and SDLX, and these improvements completely outweigh two or three drawbacks that I have found since March 2009.

Just an example:
So my question is this: Will SDL think of all the CAT Tools Specialist out there and build a tool pack made for the power user that need to prepare a lot of files everyday that just don't have the time to deal with the slow process of SDL Studio ? I have to prepare a lot of files each day and SDL Studio 2009 is just not optimized to deal with that kind of workload right now.

Have you heard about defining your own batch tasks? In fact, they could save you a lot of hassle, especially if you repeat some of your tasks regularly. You can even define the "Analyze" batch task if you like.

Perhaps you should learn better how to work with the new environment, "WhoisBatman". Things have changed since 2000. You wouldn't really want to compare project management features in T2000 to those in T2009, right? But all this has been discussed countless times and I really see no point in opening the same discussion for a 100th time.

[Upraveno: 2011-03-25 06:40 GMT]


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SDL Community  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:31
English
On analysing files Mar 25, 2011

Hi,

I'm sure that many of the issues are borne out of comparing Studio with the way things used to be, and as Stan mentioned... things have changed quite a bit. I'm not for one second going to suggest that Studio is better and has all the features of odl legacy Trados and SDLX products, because it doesn't yet, but we are continuing to work on this and to improve the product with new features and missing old ones.

I think it's worth thinking about things a different way. When you are analysing files for example you don't have to create a Project everytime. It's easy to organise the way you work in a slightly different way so that you can do this more easily and efficiently than you do now (by the sounds of it). For example:

  • Create a Project for Analysis and just add and remove files as necessary. You can create several if you like for each language pair/direction you work in, and also have all the relevant Project resources already in place to save having to go and select them.
  • Create Projects by Client and just add and remove the files when you need them so once the first Project is created you don't need another for that Client (good if you only receive one standard filetype for a particular Client)
  • Use Project Templates (or a reference Project) to create your Project based on one you have used before. This doesn't take many steps as you are virtually picking a template, adding files and then finishing.

There is an article on using an Analysis Project here if this is of interest:

All I want is a simple analysis : http://tinyurl.com/simple-analysis

We also have the OpenExchange where we, and external developers, can build small (or large) applications to make many tasks easier for you to complete, and extend the functionality of the existing toolsets. It's worth checking back here from time to time to see what's new, or follow some of the SDL Tweeters as they always Tweet about new applications, KB articles, webinars etc. as they are published.

http://www.sdl.com/en/language-technology/partners/sdl-openexchange/

Regards

Paul


[Edited at 2011-03-25 08:02 GMT]


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WhoisBatman
Local time: 07:31
TOPIC STARTER
... Mar 25, 2011

@Stanislav

I'm not saying Studio is all bad, all i'm saying is that it is *NOT* optimized for the power user. All those new spiffy filters are WAY better than SDLX or Trados for everything that's remotely recent, i can see that. Studio got a lot of features that could be even better if we, the power user, could use those features quickly instead of always having to "trick" Studio into doing what we have to do, it would be the perfect tool.

I pre/post-process thousands of files each week and Studio is simply not made to handle that much workload. Some of the features are a major leap forward, but some are a major leap backward. You've got to have your head deep in the sand to not see this.

Oh and also, instead of saying that the subject has been discussed countless times in the past and just leave without something to point me in the right direction, why don't you post some useful links where i can learn a thing or two. If i came here to ask a question, it's because i expect people to have some kind of answers and workarounds to help me appreciate Studio more.


@Paul

See, that's what i was expecting, a useful link with a hint on how i can use Studio more efficiently and guide me in the right direction so i can make my own ideas on how to deal with it.

Are you going to re-implement some of the features of SDLX in the future ? Some of the utilities were very useful (like Compare and Update) and if we could get them back it would be appreciated.

I'll certainly have more questions as i dig deeper into Studio, so i'll update this thread when they'll pop out.


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Stanislav Pokorny  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 14:31
English to Czech
+ ...
A few comments Mar 25, 2011

WhoisBatman wrote:

@Stanislav

I'm not saying Studio is all bad, all i'm saying is that it is *NOT* optimized for the power user. All those new spiffy filters are WAY better than SDLX or Trados for everything that's remotely recent, i can see that. Studio got a lot of features that could be even better if we, the power user, could use those features quickly instead of always having to "trick" Studio into doing what we have to do, it would be the perfect tool.

I don't know who you consider a power user; I'm definitely not a newbie myself and as a translator and a PM at the same time, I can see that Studio is a huge improvement compared to the previous versions of Trados. The only thing I agree to is the fact that analysing files in Studio is not quite elegant.

I pre/post-process thousands of files each week and Studio is simply not made to handle that much workload. You've got to have your head deep in the sand to not see this.

Believe me, I don't. How is Studio not suited to handle such workload? Can you elaborate more on this? I believe Paul will be most interested in hearing that. I may not prepare thousands of files each week, but I do process hundreds of them. And there's not much difference between several hundreds and several thousands, as far as process setups are concerned.

Oh and also, instead of saying that the subject has been discussed countless times in the past and just leave without something to point me in the right direction, why don't you post some useful links where i can learn a thing or two. If i came here to ask a question, it's because i expect people to have some kind of answers and workarounds to help me appreciate Studio more.

That's what I've done by providing you with a little tip on how to make your analyses a little easier. You might as well want to search this Forum.


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WhoisBatman
Local time: 07:31
TOPIC STARTER
... Mar 25, 2011

Stanislav Pokorny wrote:

I don't know who you consider a power user; I'm definitely not a newbie myself and as a translator and a PM at the same time, I can see that Studio is a huge improvement compared to the previous versions of Trados. The only thing I agree to is the fact that analysing files in Studio is not quite elegant.

Believe me, I don't. How is Studio not suited to handle such workload? Can you elaborate more on this? I believe Paul will be most interested in hearing that. I may not prepare thousands of files each week, but I do process hundreds of them. And there's not much difference between several hundreds and several thousands, as far as process setups are concerned.

That's what I've done by providing you with a little tip on how to make your analyses a little easier. You might as well want to search this Forum.


You didn't quite understand my point i think... In my first post, i said that everything can be done in a matter of seconds with SDLX.

To prove this, i did a simple test (and yes, i used a batch task in Studio, before you ask) :

1- In SDLX, i used the Project Wizard to prepare 3 simple Word files with 2 translation memories.
2- In Studio, i used the SAME files, with the SAME TMs (converted in SQL [Studio] format)

At the end, i need to have all those things :
a) The file to translate (ITD or SDLIFF file)
b) The log file so i can inject it in our system
c) The CSV file so i can provide it to our projet managers

I timed the process and this is how it went :

SDLX = about 30 seconds to do the whole thing
Studio = about 2min30sec to do the same thing.

Now, our workload is about 250 requests per day which is roughly 600 files totals per day to prepare or post-process

- Take that 30 seconds in SDLX and multiply by 250; it comes to a grand total of about 2h30min for SDLX to do all this.

- Do the same calculation with Studio and you'll clearly see that there's no way in hell that i can work with it, as it is right now, efficiently, without doing overtime and ripping my hair off.

The beauty of SDLX is that everything can be done at the same place, in ONE step. You just can't do the same thing that quickly with Studio.

Can you see now why i'm telling you that Studio is not made for the power user ?

Sure, i have a team working for me, so the 250 requests is not for one person, but it's still 5 times more than what it is taking us right now. And we do all sorts of things beside pre/post-processing files with SDLX, so time is precious. Between the pre and the post-process, we have to deal with maintaining the TM, fixing them, fixing other problems, compare documents, and there's a whole bunch of things we do that fills our day quickly, so when i see that something will take up to fivefold the time it usually would take, I AM a little concerned... especially the day when my boss will tell me that it's time to migrate to Studio 2009 since SDLX just can't keep up with all the new file types out there.

That's my point.

By the way, a Power User is someone who strickly use SDLX as a TOOL and not as a TRANSLATION SOFTWARE. There's a huge difference between the two. Translators mainly use the Edit module in SDLX. We use everything else around it and then some more.


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Stanislav Pokorny  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 14:31
English to Czech
+ ...
On speed and workflows Mar 26, 2011

To be completely honest, it's quite difficult for me to compare any software to SDLX because I only used it a few times.

This is how I do things in Studio:
1. I have defined a number of project templates for different clients and different languages; and
2. I have defined a number of batch tasks for different scenarios.
3. I have defined different QA settings for various types of projects.
Note that project templates may store even such settings as descriptive fields updates for the TM(s).

Using project templates and batch tasks and combining them, the preparation of a typical project is a matter of less than a minute on an average machine.

If I were in your shoes though, I would start thinking about the SDL's Translation Management System which may speed up your processes considerably. And I would perhaps also start thinking about adapting current workflows to the new working environment. My guess is that you are stuck with SDLX and want to use new software to do things "the old way". It is probably very difficult to fit a new tool into processes and workflows that you had created for a completely different tool.

My (distant) point of view...

[Upraveno: 2011-03-26 10:31 GMT]


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