Can Studio 2011 finally be installed on other drives than C:?
Thread poster: Erik Freitag

Erik Freitag  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:47
Member (2006)
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Oct 26, 2011

Dear colleagues,

While going through one of my recent problems with Studio 2009, SDL support staff suggested to install Studio 2011 instead and try if the problem would be solved. I politely declined, because I do not want to run into the problems many early adopters had with 2009, and also because I've not enough time right now to install new software.

That's as maybe, thinking about it, I think I may have discovered another problem: If I decide to upgrade to 2011 at a later time, will I be able to install it on a different drive than C: (like I can with any other software)? If the answer is no, I will probably not be able to install it at all, as my brandnew computer's C: drive is an SSD drive which was supposed to hold nothing but the OS. Now, thanks to Studio 2009 obligatory installation on C:, it is already very full and can certainly not hold another huge piece of software. That might eventually be the final straw that makes me investigate in other software suites.

Thanks for any advice.

Kind regards,
Erik


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Erik Freitag  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:47
Member (2006)
Dutch to German
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TOPIC STARTER
Installation on C: still obligatory Oct 27, 2011

Dear colleagues,

SDL staff just informed me that, like its predecessor, Studio 2011 cannot be installed on any other drive than C:. Does anybody know any other serious software package that imposes such a restriction?

Since I can't do that on my brandnew computer (at least not until I completely delete Studio 2009 in order to free up enough disc space on the SSD drive planned exclusively for the operating system), I'm in a dead end.

Why isn't this information included in the system specs?

Time to switch to alternatives.

Kind regards,
Erik


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Natalie  Identity Verified
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Not quite so Oct 27, 2011

A few years ago I moved my Trados 2007 installation from C: to D: where I install all programs (if I am not mistaken, I used Funduc Application Mover) in both my computers. Since then all Trados programs, including both versions of Studio, install happily at my D: drives.

So just install it and then move where you wish.
Natalia


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Richard Hall  Identity Verified
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That's odd Oct 27, 2011

I installed studios 2009 and 2011 directly on my E drive.

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Stefan Keller  Identity Verified
Germany
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How? Oct 28, 2011

Richard Hall wrote:

I installed studios 2009 and 2011 directly on my E drive.


Hi Richard,

How on earth did you manage to do so? Did you change the default programs folder in your Windows registry? I'm not being asked by the installer where to install the program. It just installs to "C:\Program Files (x86)", and there's nothing I can do about it.

BTW, when Studio 2009 was released, I posted an "idea" asking to leave the installation path up to us (see http://ideas.sdltrados.com/ideas/detail.asp?i=2239) . After this idea had 250 votes, SDL just locked it and posted a pretty patronizing comment on why they won't change this.

Stefan


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Erik Freitag  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:47
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How? Oct 28, 2011

Yes, I'd be interested to know how you did that as well, Richard.

Stefan Keller wrote:

BTW, when Studio 2009 was released, I posted an "idea" asking to leave the installation path up to us (see http://ideas.sdltrados.com/ideas/detail.asp?i=2239) . After this idea had 250 votes, SDL just locked it and posted a pretty patronizing comment on why they won't change this.

Stefan


Indeed: Sad.


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Richard Hall  Identity Verified
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Installed on E drive Oct 28, 2011

Sadly, I'm not at the computer right now (but will be from mid November). I can't remember the installation process, so I suspect it installed there automatically. I can confirm in a couple of weeks.

The reason I installed on the E drive is because I had created two separate partitions on the computer: one for play (C drive) and one for work (E drive).

Systems files such as Documents and Settings, Program Files, ProgramData, Windows, etc. are all on the E Drive as well as the C Drive.

I run Windows 7 Professional 64 bit on that computer.

Sorry not be of more help. If you would like more information, I can provide it after mid November.


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Stanislav Pokorny  Identity Verified
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System drive = installation drive Oct 28, 2011

Richard Hall wrote:

The reason I installed on the E drive is because I had created two separate partitions on the computer: one for play (C drive) and one for work (E drive).


I may be exactly wrong about this, but AFAIK, Studio installs automatically on the system drive. So, if Richard installed his OS on the E drive, Studio will install there automatically too.


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Stefan Keller  Identity Verified
Germany
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C drive / System drive Oct 28, 2011

Stanislav Pokorny wrote:
I may be exactly wrong about this, but AFAIK, Studio installs automatically on the system drive. So, if Richard installed his OS on the E drive, Studio will install there automatically too.


But isn't the system drive always the boot drive? And can this possibly be anything else than C?
And besides, this will not help if you want to have a dedicated Windows drive and a separate drive for applications (which surely is the way to go if you have an SSD).


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Stanislav Pokorny  Identity Verified
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Replies Oct 28, 2011

Hi Stefan,
here are my replies (please take them with a pinch of salt):


But isn't the system drive always the boot drive? And can this possibly be anything else than C?

You should be able to specify that in the BIOS menu.

And besides, this will not help if you want to have a dedicated Windows drive and a separate drive for applications (which surely is the way to go if you have an SSD).

You are fully right about this. However, even if you install e.g. the MS Office application (core) files on a specific drive (e.g. other than "C"), still many other files will install to different locations beyond your control.
On the other hand, if you only have a small, OS-dedicated "C" partition, you may have a problem with Studio.


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Erik Freitag  Identity Verified
Germany
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Dedicated system drive Oct 28, 2011

Stanislav Pokorny wrote:

You are fully right about this. However, even if you install e.g. the MS Office application (core) files on a specific drive (e.g. other than "C"), still many other files will install to different locations beyond your control.


Bad enough, but at least they don't clog the drive with all(!) the files, most of which surely don't need to be on the system drive.

Stanislav Pokorny wrote:
On the other hand, if you only have a small, OS-dedicated "C" partition, you may have a problem with Studio.


I do.


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Stefan Keller  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:47
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Yes and No Oct 28, 2011


You should be able to specify that in the BIOS menu.


As far as I'm aware, you can specify physical drives as boot devices, but not a partition.

You are fully right about this. However, even if you install e.g. the MS Office application (core) files on a specific drive (e.g. other than "C"), still many other files will install to different locations beyond your control.
On the other hand, if you only have a small, OS-dedicated "C" partition, you may have a problem with Studio.


Regarding the "many other files": I'm pretty sure that you can tell Windows to create new users at a different location (other than "C:\Users"). And that's where most of the files go that are "beyond your control". So, what I will try when I set up my new PC is change the location of the "Users" folder right after installing Windows (while still being logged in with the admin account) and then create my actual user profile to work with in a location on another drive. I really hope this works.
Secondly, I will try to change the default Programs installation folder in the registry, so all applications that don't ask for a path and that by default install to "C:\Program Files" will default to the new location as specified in the registry.
If both of these methods work, I should save *a lot* of space on my C drive.

But it's really funny how the SDL guys simply refuse to even consider changing their approach in terms of their installer.

Regards,
Stefan

[Edited at 2011-10-28 14:03 GMT]

[Edited at 2011-10-28 14:04 GMT]


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Richard Hall  Identity Verified
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Dual boot Oct 28, 2011

I suspect Stanislav has a point. I boot on my E drive. In other words I select at start up if I want to boot onto C or E.

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Stanislav Pokorny  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 07:47
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Not in defence, but... Oct 28, 2011

Stefan Keller wrote:
You are fully right about this. However, even if you install e.g. the MS Office application (core) files on a specific drive (e.g. other than "C"), still many other files will install to different locations beyond your control.
On the other hand, if you only have a small, OS-dedicated "C" partition, you may have a problem with Studio.


Regarding the "many other files": I'm pretty sure that you can tell Windows to create new users at a different location (other than "C:\Users"). And that's where most of the files go that are "beyond your control".


Hi Stefan,
I'm certainly not trying to defend SDL's approach to this, I also like to see my system drive neat and clean. But consider this:
How many .NET applications that install largely to the GAC let you change where they are installed? How many Microsoft (or other vendor) installers that install to the SxS cache are letting you change where they go (such as msxml, VC runtimes, and many other 3rd party libraries)? Then there are COM objects that go in Common Files, the filter framework files in Application data etc. There is much more to this issue and I can only hope that your Studio installation won't get messed up by changing the "Users" folder location etc.
I'll keep my fingers crossed for you.


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Stefan Keller  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 07:47
English to German
Okay Oct 28, 2011

Richard Hall wrote:

I suspect Stanislav has a point. I boot on my E drive. In other words I select at start up if I want to boot onto C or E.


Still, having Windows and Studio on E is not what I want. I don't care about the drive letter, I want to keep Sudio separate from Windows.


Stanislav Pokorny wrote:

There is much more to this issue and I can only hope that your Studio installation won't get messed up by changing the "Users" folder location etc.
I'll keep my fingers crossed for you.


Thanks. Of course, I will make all these changes prior to installing Studio (or anything else, that is). And if the installer obtains its required variables from the registry (which I really hope it does, instead of them being hard-coded), there shouldn't be a problem.


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