Two queries about Dragon
Thread poster: adrienneiii

adrienneiii
United States
Local time: 18:10
Spanish to English
+ ...
Jul 22, 2014

Hello there, I'm considering purchasing DNS to use with SDL Trados Studio, but I know very little about the issues involved - please bear with me! I am a fast typer, but want to avoid posture problems.

I have the following questions:

1) How does DNS work with the translation memory? Presumably one commands it to move to the next segment, translation memory pops up where available, and one somehow edits it by voice. Is that the case? While I can see the straightforward usefulness of dictating brand new text, I wonder if trying to voice-edit a, say, 70% match is going to be more trouble than it's worth!

2) The documents I translate contain a lot of project and organizational names that need to be stated in the original language. How easy or difficult is this to manage in DNS?

Really appreciate your feedback...


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Stuart Hoskins
Local time: 03:10
Czech to English
+ ...
Mousey mousey Jul 23, 2014

1) I find it quicker to work my way around fuzzy matches with a mouse. "Click-and-speak"

2) it's easy to play around with the vocabulary list. For example, I have trained my Dragon to insert "Spišska Nova Ves" (a Slovak town) when I say "spicy village" (i.e. I am never likely to need the actual term "spicy village", so I've put it to good use somewhere else). I have done this with many non-English names of towns/institutions.


[Edited at 2014-07-23 06:51 GMT]


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Philippe Etienne  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:10
Member
English to French
A combination of voice, keyboard shortcuts and mouse clicks Jul 23, 2014

I hardly use Dragon commands. My own use of Dragon is restricted to typing, and I got used to spot the mistakes it makes (which are quite different from typing typos).
For fuzzies I mainly use the keyboard to select/move and the odd spoken word or phrase.

Even though I don't use all its functionality, I still find I am more productive and can work more comfortably. I've always found (self-taught) typing very annoying, and I have been using Dragon for many many years.

If you are a fast typist, you may not notice any productivity improvements, but you probably reduce your risk of RSI syndrome.

Philippe

[Edited at 2014-07-23 10:54 GMT]


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Peter Linton  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:10
Member (2002)
Swedish to English
+ ...
Two answers Jul 23, 2014

adrienneiii wrote:
1) How does DNS work with the translation memory?

Although you can set up DNS with editing commands, many people including me prefer to do what you suggest, namely use the keyboard for editing commands and DNS for text. That seems to be the most efficient way of working.

Incidentally I also have a programmable keyboard. Some complex editing sequences can be stored as macros.

2) The documents I translate contain a lot of project and organizational names that need to be stated in the original language. How easy or difficult is this to manage in DNS

DNS comes with a large number of names and places.
Aristotle Sophocles Pythagoras - I have just dictated these names for the very first time and DNS got them right. In addition, as Stuart says, you can train DNS. Sometimes that is necessary because DNS thinks I said Stewart.

A final bit of advice - the key to success in DNS is elocution. DNS is not psychic and cannot make mistakes. If it does not reproduce your words as you expect, the fault lies in your elocution. Add to that training and DNS will give you a remarkably high success rate. They have also just announced a new version. On past experience, each new version has produced a noticeable improvement.


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Claire Cox
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:10
French to English
+ ...
Ditto Jul 23, 2014

I use Dragon with Wordfast and Studio, equally successfully, but find its main benefits are in large text volumes. As other have said, I tend to use my mouse or keyboard shortcuts to jump to the next segment (CRTL + enter), do a concordance search (F3) etc, and then just dictate the text in each segment. Fuzzy matches I either edit manually or, for large segments, highlight the part I want to overtype and dictate that. It's often easier to get around the problem of dictating unusual names by copying the source and dictating the rest of the text. Either way, there are huge productivity gains to be made by dictating and I heartily recommend it, quite apart from resolving any RSI issues! I've written at length about my experiences with Dragon here: http://clairecoxtranslations.wordpress.com/2014/03/03/taming-the-dragon/

Good luck!

[Edited at 2014-07-23 11:41 GMT]


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Steven Segaert
Estonia
Local time: 04:10
Member (2012)
English to Dutch
+ ...
Combinations Jul 23, 2014

As most others do, I also use Dragon in combination with the keyboard (in MemoQ). My main reason is that I dictate in Dutch, while my software answers to English commands. Dragon itself can of course be managed with Dutch voice commands, so I do use those.

In other words, I use voice to navigate in Dragon, but I use the keyboard to control MemoQ. Works fine with me.

TM matches show up in the grid on the right-hand side in MemoQ, and I use them as inspiration: I dictate whatever I can use from the TM result. If there are a lot of high % matches, I use the pre-translate function to populate these segments already, and correct or edit using mouse and keyboard. Navigating within a segment and editing using voice only doesn't quite work for me.


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adrienneiii
United States
Local time: 18:10
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Which version? Jul 23, 2014

Thanks so very much for all this highly useful feedback! Claire, I particularly like your suggestion of saying eg. "daffodil" for a particular term and then doing search and replace. That could probably work pretty well for me.

I thought there was a trial version, but there seems not to be, am I right? Which version do you all use? Claire indicates in her blog that the Home version has been sufficient for her needs. In my case I rarely receive anything other than Word files to translate, and in any case it's academic because the infrequent Excel ones are run through Trados. Correct? Any reason I would need the Premium version?

Thank you again. This forum is such an excellent resource!


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adrienneiii
United States
Local time: 18:10
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
How about abbreviations? Jul 23, 2014

(and is it really that important to summarize one's main point in the title?!)

I have an awful lot of abbreviations in my texts - how do you all deal with them?

Thanks again...


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adrienneiii
United States
Local time: 18:10
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Any answers to my last two posts? Jul 24, 2014

Very much appreciated...

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Orrin Cummins  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 11:10
Japanese to English
+ ...
No, you can type anything in the title Jul 24, 2014

adrienneiii wrote:

(and is it really that important to summarize one's main point in the title?!)

I have an awful lot of abbreviations in my texts - how do you all deal with them?

Thanks again...


I just translated an interview about anti-diabetic medication where I had to say "GLP-1 agonists" several dozens of times. I was able to train Dragon to say it correctly.

The first time you say it, Dragon will probably get it completely wrong. But if you say, "Spell that," a window will come up and you can say (or typing is faster) the correct spelling. There is an option in that window to "Train" the word, where you can record your pronunciation so that Dragon will theoretically get it right in the future. Interestingly, as long as what you record doesn't conflict with any words that Dragon already knows, you can say anything you want for the abbreviation, I think. It doesn't actually have to match what you want Dragon to input.


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Philippe Etienne  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:10
Member
English to French
I use version Premium Jul 26, 2014

adrienneiii wrote:
Any reason I would need the Premium version?

Can't remember why, but the Home version lacks something necessary for my (and other translators') work. It used to be named version Preferred before v11 I think.
There should be resources on the Net where versions are compared.


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Claire Cox
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:10
French to English
+ ...
Home for me Jul 26, 2014

I've certainly always found the Home version more than satisfactory for my needs, as I said in my blog article. I believe Home doesn't work with Excel or PowerPoint files directly, but since I always translate these via a CAT tool, that isn't a problem. You can't use an external dictaphone with Home, but I'm not sure why you would want to unless you're on the move a lot. The comparison guides say you can't manage/export user files but I've always been able to do this when I've changed my computers/added new laptops, etc. over the years. I think the Premium version also offers you the facility to playback what you've just dictated, but again that's not a feature I've ever needed. I can only say that I've been dictating with Dragon for about 8 years now and the Home version does everything I need it to. The only thing I would add, as I think I said in my blog, is that it's worth buying a separate headset. I love the Plantronics wireless one I have at present - gives you even more ease of movement and choice of typing positions and no tripping over the wire. The only proviso is remember to keep it charged up!

There's a comparison here:

http://www.spectronicsinoz.com/product/36039/popup/

All the best,

Claire


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adrienneiii
United States
Local time: 18:10
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Abbreviations Jul 26, 2014

Getting close to purchase point here! Thanks for the latest feedback.

One last query - how does DNS handle abbreviations? My texts have an awful lot of them!

Thanks so much.


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Claire Cox
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:10
French to English
+ ...
It depends... Jul 28, 2014

... on the abbreviation. Dragon usually copes fine, but occasionally gets it wrong. Again, you could either copy the source (if the abbreviation is the same in both languages) or train Dragon to recognise a different word for particularly tricky abbreviations it persistently misrecognises, e.g. lollipop instead of IAIA for example! It's certainly not a big problem and Dragon recognises or can be trained to recognise a great many abbreviations anyway.

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Orrin Cummins  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 11:10
Japanese to English
+ ...
I mentioned this above... Jul 28, 2014

adrienneiii wrote:

Getting close to purchase point here! Thanks for the latest feedback.

One last query - how does DNS handle abbreviations? My texts have an awful lot of them!

Thanks so much.


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