electronic subtitling on screen
Thread poster: xxxfmegermann
xxxfmegermann
Spanish to German
Jul 7, 2008

Hello,

I usually do subtitling over DVD, but would like to know which software I can use for electronic subtitling over 35 mm on the movie screen, which they usually do at film festivals. Has anyone of you done this job before?

As well I usually loose much film quality after the subtitling, as I have to pass the films to DviX. Anybody knows how I can avoid that?

Thanks for your help.
F.


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Damian Harrison
Germany
Local time: 15:24
German to English
Jul 7, 2008



[Edited at 2008-07-08 15:15]


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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 08:24
French to Spanish
+ ...
Don't get your question. Jul 7, 2008

Why do you want a software for electronic subtitling on 35 mm. motion pictures?
It won't help you no way to subtitle a DVD.
Or did I miss your question?
Anyway, every large company who does electronic subtitling has his own software, A.F.A.I.K. Others simply use Power Point, not good.

I have my own, even if I'm not a "large" company, though.

Electronic subtitiling is a quite small market and I realy don't know if there are software out there.

Electronic subtitling demands:

1.- xxx software, more or less sophisticated;
2.- 1 laptop;
3.- 1 video projector, wich projects subtitles on the main screen or another, smaller (what I do).

I realy don't see how it would help you.

Regards.


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Sergei Leshchinsky  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 16:24
Member (2008)
English to Russian
+ ...
if te source in DVD... Jul 7, 2008

Try SubRip. It's free. Google for it.

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xxxfmegermann
Spanish to German
TOPIC STARTER
Answering your comments Jul 8, 2008

Thanks a lot for your help, guys.

Here are my answers on our comments.

DAMIAN, we use AutoGK to pass from DVD to Divx, and mostly Nero to pass from from Divx to DVD. Is that what you meant asking how we edit the film?
I'll look for this book.

JUAN JACOB,
The reason why I'm interested in electronic subtitling over 35 is that I cooperate with several little film festivals and film days and would like to be able to do electronic subtitles because right now we can never screen in 35 those films that need subtitling. I know (more or less) how it works but never found a software to do it. Is my concern clearer now?

SERGEI,
Do you think SubRip is better tan subtitle workshop.

Thanks so much for your help guys.
Frieder


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FarkasAndras
Local time: 15:24
English to Hungarian
+ ...
what gives? Jul 8, 2008

Please tell me how you are going to use a software tool to put subtitles on 35 mm film, which is actual, physical film unless I'm horribly mistaken. You know, like in the olden days... which means you can't stuff it in your computer.

Juan Jacob's is the only post I can make any sense of... use a separate projector that only shoots out the subtitles.


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 12:24
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Some answers Jul 8, 2008

fmegermann wrote:
we use AutoGK to pass from DVD to Divx,


I never used it. I use the (free) AVI.net from http://www.clonead.co.uk . According to their web site: There are many commercial programs available to allow you to convert a DVD to an AVI, though I will make quite a bold statement, you will not find any commercial program to convert a DVD to an AVI that gives you 'better' quality than that of the many freely available alternatives.
... and it gives really great quality!

would like to be able to do electronic subtitles because right now we can never screen in 35 those films that need subtitling.


Film subtitling is a mechanical process, so there is no way to subtitle the film itself without making a copy of it. One way is to convert the film into digital video with adequate, and then subtitling the latter.

The other way calls for some invention that would use two projectors. One Lumière-type mechanical movie projector for the film, and a digital projector to show the subtitlies on the same screen. The latter would be some PowerPoint-like slide show with the subtitles at the bottom of a black screen. The whole problem is to sync them.

Digital timing can be made accurate (though somewhat unlikely with PowerPoint), but a minor speed fluctuation in the projector motor would throw them off without a chance to fix it during the show. Also the sync-ed start would require some care.

There are some large marquee displays used for "subtitling" drama or opera, but this should be quite expensive. For film festivals, where each film would be shown only once, manual operation would be a feasible option.

Do you think SubRip is better tan subtitle workshop.


AFAIK SubRip is some kind of subtitle OCR program. If you have a video with the subtitles burnt on the image, it wil enable you to extract the subtitles and the spotting from there, generating a subtitles text file, which could be translated and reimplemented to the film with.

This subtitles file could easily be translated with Subtitle Workshop, which is a program actually to generate a subtitles file.

HTH.


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xxxfmegermann
Spanish to German
TOPIC STARTER
electronic subtitling on screen Jul 11, 2008

The kind of subtitling I refer to is exactly the one Juan Jacob refers to. (With an extra beamer over the film or on an extra screen just below.) I know how it works, but can't find the right software for it.

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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 08:24
French to Spanish
+ ...
Hi again. Jul 11, 2008

As I said, I don't think you'll find some software out there.
I think every company who do electronic subtitling have his own.
If you wish, write me in private.


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electronic subtitling on screen

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