Hilarious! How not to subtitle a French movie.
Thread poster: Erik Hansson

Erik Hansson  Identity Verified
Germany
Member (2002)
Swedish
+ ...
Jun 3, 2009

Dear ProZians,

Please have a look at the English subtitle for this French movie.
Simply hilarious.

http://hestika.blogspot.com/2009/04/best-translation-ever.html

Best regards
Erik


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Attila Piróth  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 18:55
Member
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Wow! Jun 3, 2009

If only they had used google translate!
This is simply awesome.
Thanks for sharing.
Attila


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ShaniinParis
France
Local time: 18:55
Japanese to French
+ ...
hey, at least... Jun 3, 2009

.... they got "deux jours " -> "two days" right.

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Yasutomo Kanazawa  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:55
The scenes change so rapidly Jun 3, 2009

that I have a hard time following the subtitles, and makes me think a lot what each subtitle is trying to say. While thinking, it's already the next scene. I feel like I'm watching a movie in two languages which I don't comprehend at all.

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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 15:55
English to Portuguese
+ ...
What's the use? Jun 3, 2009

If I couldn't understand French, these subs wouldn't have helped me in any way. So why take the trouble / expense (if any - not worth it) to translate so badly and subtitle even worse?

Actually the subtitles in English detract from my attention when I need it most, as my French is not that good. Had they dubbed it in Korean, Hungarian, Swahili, or any language I can't understand a word, I'd be paying more attention to the images.


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Kay Barbara
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:55
Member (2008)
English to German
+ ...
LOL @ 0:51 Jun 3, 2009

"You (formal) is elegant"

This is really too good (i.e. bad) to be true.
Got to watch it again... brilliant!

Thanks for sharing this "master piece"

Cheers


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Angela Dickson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:55
French to English
+ ...
! Jun 3, 2009

It's a joke, folks.

http://videogum.com/archives/trailer/the-coco-before-chanel-trailer_065581.html

Though I find it hard to believe that even a schoolkid would have no idea that you're supposed to produce something comprehensible when you translate.


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 19:55
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Not used to texted movies? Jun 3, 2009

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:

If I couldn't understand French, these subs wouldn't have helped me in any way. So why take the trouble / expense (if any - not worth it) to translate so badly and subtitle even worse?

Actually the subtitles in English detract from my attention when I need it most, as my French is not that good. Had they dubbed it in Korean, Hungarian, Swahili, or any language I can't understand a word, I'd be paying more attention to the images.


You probably live in a country where everything is dubbed. For us who are used to texted movies (or call it subtitles) watching dubbed movies is a torture. Humphrey Bogart opens his mouth once and the Spanish synchroniser speaking "Rabladaboda" or something like that.

I saw the Finnish version of that Coco-film add yesterday. Seems worth watching.

Regards
Heinrich


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Erik Hansson  Identity Verified
Germany
Member (2002)
Swedish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Don't like dubbed movies Jun 3, 2009

Heinrich Pesch wrote:

For us who are used to texted movies (or call it subtitles) watching dubbed movies is a torture. Humphrey Bogart opens his mouth once and the Spanish synchroniser speaking "Rabladaboda" or something like that.


Regards
Heinrich


I can only agree with you, Heinrich. First time I heard James Bond [pronouncing his name Dscheems Bont] speaking German I almost fell off the chair. Dubbing a movie is a professional way of reducing its quality.

No wonder why the English knowledge level is higher in countries where the movies (OK, I admit it's often US American movies) are shown with original sound and subtitles.


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 15:55
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Brazil Jun 3, 2009

Heinrich Pesch wrote:
You probably live in a country where everything is dubbed.


Not at all. Though on most open channels here the foreign films/series are dubbed, on cable TV there are specific all-dubbed and all-subbed channels. Some of them mix these, and a few sometimes present the same film (at least) twice, once dubbed, and once subbed.

Most - if not all - DVDs sold here are both dubbed and subbed. Cinemas often have separate dubbed and subbed sessions.

Interestingly, I think Brazilian dubbing stands alone at the top for quality.The late Walt Disney, in ancient times, was really impressed.Of course, I'm talking abot the best here in the trade. The worst ones are pretty average, if compared worldwide. I think our dubbers - internationally - are better than our soccer players.

The problem is that the dubbers' union in Brazil is quite strong. If they go on strike, how will TV stations get money from the sponsors if they show untranslated movies? So their minimum rates are strictly respected. On the other hand, there are no rules for video translation rates, so that's the only spot left for cutting costs/increasing profit. This gives a chance to the cheaper guys when quality is not a strong issue. The result is that sometimes I watch a magnificent dramatic performance by a dubber, however I have to back-translate some real trash to get a faint idea on what they mean.

Personally, I have been translating for dubbing since 1987, and for subtitling since 2004. Nevertheless my quality/price keeps me resricted to the corporate video market. I'm only requested to tranlate a full-feature movie when a dubbing studio decides to dazzle some brodcasting station or video distributor.

Finally, no, I'm not the one and only. All translators working for Disney have to adopt the same standards. My 7-yo daughter has amazingly correct enunciation, pronunciation and grammar. It seeped into her, because since an earliy age she got used to play while having the (dubbed) Disney channel on. Now she watches other channels, but that has already set within her.


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Attila Piróth  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 18:55
Member
English to Hungarian
+ ...
YouTube and Google Translate Jun 4, 2009

A couple of months ago YouTube added an automatic subtitle translation function via Google Translate; the announcement can be read here.

Attila


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Eleftherios Kritikakis  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 11:55
Member (2003)
Greek to English
+ ...
Actually... Jun 5, 2009

Actually it makes the movie very interesting. For a while now I've been saying "there's nothing new in cinema"... but here it is. I have never seen anything like that before. It's a new Art Movement. Step aside Ionesco...

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