Closed Captioning rates
Thread poster: maciej-k
maciej-k
United States
Local time: 15:56
English to Polish
+ ...
Aug 14, 2013

Hi All!

This forum (and Proz in general) has been very helpful to me on numerous occasions, without the need to post. However, now it is time to ask my first question.

I have found many posts discussing rates for SUBTITLING. What about Closed Captioning, though?

I don't expect much of a difference if the source and target languages are different. However, when the source and target languages are the same, CC is essentially transcribing + timecoding, as opposed to translating + timecoding. Therefore, I would expect rates to be a bit lower for CC. On the other hand, CC involves positioning of captions, which makes the technical part of the job more time consuming.

Do rates for subtitling and CC differ? If so, how much?

Additional info: freelancer on the US market.

Regards,

Night Rider


Direct link Reply with quote
 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 17:56
English to Portuguese
+ ...
It's a different field of work Aug 14, 2013

While subtitling can be done with extremely high quality using freeware, closed captioning absolutely requires specialized software, not free, and not so cheap either.

The difference is that while subtitles are burned on the video, closed captions are encoded on it, and need to be decoded by the TV where they will be played (which may lack such feature). It is so different that closed captions can be added to analog video, e.g. the agonizing VHS.

Subtitles may be authored onto a DVD, hence overlaid on the video, yet no free DVD authoring software provides high quality.

In all the 26 years I've been working with video dubbing and later subtitling too, I only got four scattered requests for closed captions. These would never justify investing in the proper software. In all these cases, clients agreed to have me merely subtitle the captions, permanently burned on the video.

Apparently there are some issues with closed captions on DVD. I read something about that on Wikipedia in English.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
maciej-k
United States
Local time: 15:56
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Subtitling as an option Aug 14, 2013

Thanks for your reply, José.

It seems to me like there is more demand for CC here in the US. Almost all the DVDs come out with CC/SDH included. In fact, I do not recall seeing a DVD that would be recent and not include CCs. Cable programming offers CC as well, although I am aware that some of them are CC'ed live, which is a completely different beast. Also, given the market, I would expect more work within the same language, English, with no translation involved.

I guess subtitling can be an option for some clients. How do you charge in this case? I am assuming you would work with one language (there's no need for translation), so it comes down to transcribing + cuing.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 17:56
English to Portuguese
+ ...
It's a niche market Aug 14, 2013

Yes, commercially sold DVDs with feature movies most likely would have CC. However the easiest way to make them would be by editing the final cut script, which should be still available at that time for the producer.

I specialize on the other end of the continuum... corporate video, where the script is seldom available, and the producer is often unknown by the client who approaches me in Brazil.

In your case, I think any movie producer will use their internal staff to edit and time the original script for closed captioning, no translation involved. I guess that even if an American commercial feature film DVD is launched, say, with at most 8 soundtracks, one original and the others dubbed, and up to 30 sets of subtitles, only one CC will be available... in English. That's easy to do in the USA.


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Closed Captioning rates

Advanced search







memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »
BaccS – Business Accounting Software
Modern desktop project management for freelance translators

BaccS makes it easy for translators to manage their projects, schedule tasks, create invoices, and view highly customizable reports. User-friendly, ProZ.com integration, community-driven development – a few reasons BaccS is trusted by translators!

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search