Current subtitling rates ENG-SPA
Thread poster: Tracy Mackay

Tracy Mackay  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 19:25
Member (2009)
Spanish to English
+ ...
May 7, 2015

Hi all,

I haven't been able to find current threads on this matter, so I was wondering if you could help me out and let me know how much it would be for a 60 minute video, english to spanish.

Thank you so much!


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Josephine Cassar  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:25
Member (2012)
Italian to English
+ ...
Doubtful May 7, 2015

Hello, I asked just this week, but inconclusive. The question was not exactly like yours but for editing. Note that it takes an awful lot of time to translate/proofread/edit subtitles. It also depends which on the video as it makes a difference if the video is one where you have to check if the speaker is referring to a male/female or if the speaker is a male/female, or a plain-sailing one where you do not have to check such things continually. Another stumbling block is character limit;if there is a character limit, you have to check all the time that you do not exceed it. Someone posted that in the US-and I know it is true- rate offered is of $3/5 per minute video, but I was offered €0.10 per video minute for proofreading, then another €0.9 for editing the same text to check the character limit and adjust, but it takes a lot of time during which you cannot do other work. If the subtitling work is urgent, charge more. A video minute can take as much as a whole A4 page, so better ask to see the video and the word file before, as you may end up spending far, far more time than you think on this work. Hope someone else answers you. Good luck.

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Liza Chase  Identity Verified
Bulgaria
Local time: 01:25
Member (2013)
English to German
+ ...
this might help.... May 8, 2015

I charge between € 5 and €13 per running minute, depending on what needs to be done (plain translating an already time-coded script, time coding + translating, or transcription of the video, time coding + translating).

This thread might be helpful;

http://www.proz.com/forum/subtitling/283471-ask_me_anything_about_subtitling.html

Good Luck


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Tracy Mackay  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 19:25
Member (2009)
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you May 8, 2015

Thanks to both of you for your help and quick replies!!

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Bernhard Sulzer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 18:25
Partial member (2006)
English to German
+ ...
Price May 9, 2015

Liza Chase wrote:


I charge between € 5 and €13 per running minute, depending on what needs to be done (plain translating an already time-coded script, time coding + translating, or transcription of the video, time coding + translating).

This thread might be helpful;

http://www.proz.com/forum/subtitling/283471-ask_me_anything_about_subtitling.html

Good Luck


So if there's 200 words per minute and you charge €13, that would be €0.065/word for the most complex task possible.
What was a word total you worked with? I realize people aren't usually speaking at 200 wpm in English, but around 150 is pretty average.
Add complexity (speech patterns, accents) and additional tasks (besides translating) and one realizes that this job should pay more.

[Edited at 2015-05-09 05:48 GMT]


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Josephine Cassar  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:25
Member (2012)
Italian to English
+ ...
€0.065 per word and 'it should pay more' May 9, 2015

My that's a low rate, especially for doing any type of work concerning subtitles, whether translation/proofreading or editing. You worked it out well, even if subtitles tend to be shorter than 200 words per minute.

Certainly, it should pay more especially seeing that, many times, one has to go back and check the video and keep to the specified character limit. That makes it far more time consuming. Sometimes, this is easier if one is sent the video where the words are to appear so one does not have to check each line separately in a character/word counter.
[Edited at 2015-05-09 12:56 GMT]

[Edited at 2015-05-09 13:08 GMT]

[Edited at 2015-05-09 13:09 GMT]

[Edited at 2015-05-09 13:11 GMT]

[Edited at 2015-05-09 13:14 GMT]


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 19:25
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Dissecting a specimen May 9, 2015

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:

So if there's 200 words per minute and you charge €13, that would be €0.065/word for the most complex task possible.
Add complexity (speech patterns, accents) and additional tasks (besides translating) and one realizes that this job should pay more.


I'd like to take the Sintra (Brazilian Translators Syndicate) suggested rates for video work under the microscope, in order to draw some possibly useful conclusions.

Before I do that, a few remarks are in place:

1. I am not - and never was - in any way affiliated with Sintra. My personal position regarding them is absolutely neutral.

2. Sintra is a small organization. Using the search feature on their web site for ANY, I found that they have 361 members. Proz has 534 (paying) members who stated their location in Brazil, 11,907 "total results" on a search for "location = Brazil), whatever this means.

3. IMHO the rates suggested by Sintra are inflated, they include considerable "wishful thinking", and would be useful for any translator to show any prospect that their rates are considerably lower than that. Their suggested rates for plain text translation, usually received and sent via Internet are about 20~30% higher than the statutory prices for the most expensive type (there are two) of sworn translations in the Sao Paulo State, which are printed, signed, and involve the translator taking personal liability for their accuracy.

4. I think that someone knowledgeable at Sintra took great care to develop the price structure I will analyze below, otherwise it would tend to discredit the organization.

5. The rates are left in Brazilian Reais (BRL/R$). Please note that as of late this currency has dropped suddenly and significantly relative to the USD/EUR. It had been relatively stable around USD 1 = BRL 2 from 2012 through early 2014.

6. Descriptions of Sintra items are shown in bold below.

Videos for TV, VHS, or DVD, per minute of playing time (dialog and/or narration) (minimum charge is for 15 minutes):

Translation for subtitling with a complete script being provided (without time spotting): R$ 26.00


The 15-minute minimum makes sense, considering that there are items that have to be done once for each video, regardless of its duration, such as downloading, grappling with codecs, converting if necessary, and so on. Some of them take a long time, but that will be "mechanical" work that a computer may be left doing on its own, overnight if necessary.

Translation for subtitling without a complete script being provided (without time spotting): R$ 39.00

Did you notice what I just saw?

A 50% surcharge for the translator having to listen and understand what is spoken on the video!

Due to my specialization, corporate video (video production being outside my client's core business, so they usually don't have it), I seldom get the script. So I got used to work without it, and charge the same, regardless of whether it is provided or not.

This however is probably what led to the development of template-based video translation, and relatively few translators having developed the skill to work without a script.

Anyway, 50% of the translation-with-script cost provides an ample budget for transcription services. Maybe that's why so many clients ask for transcription and translation right away, when they don't have a script.

Translation for subtitling with time-spotting, add: 30%

IMO this makes sense, and I have adopted it myself.

However it is interesting to notice that it says "translation with time-spotting", so the translator will supposedly be time-spotting his/her own translation. That's why I charge more (45% of what my translation would cost) when a translation is provided. In most cases, someone merely transcribed it, and that transcript was translated, no attention being given to conciseness. So there is a high risk that, upon time-spotting a third-party translation, I'll have to adapt and condense it significantly.

Technical, training, or documentary videos, add: 40%

Now I'll address Bernhard's WPM point at the outset here.

A feature film or TV series will have many scenes with music-only, snipers lurking, the chase, shootings, love scenes, landscapes, vehicles traveling, etc. So the word count will tend to be much lower.

The three categories above are typically spoken from start to end, so the word count justifies these 40%. Nevertheless, say, in a conference, the word count may vary significantly. My PET comparison involves two PETers (pun intended): the late Peter Drucker and Tom Peters. Watch both on YouTube, compare, and you'll see my point.

So my solution was to set an average rate, one size that fits all. Win on some, lose on others. If I have enough variety and quantity, this should work, and has so far.

Translation from the local language (PT) into a foreign one, add: 70%

Again, I charge the same rate per minute for my own reasons, but the demand I have for it is negligible.

Most often this kind of work is done in the destination country, and such a hefty surcharge helps ensuring that.


I hope this helps to shed some additional light on the issue.


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Current subtitling rates ENG-SPA

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