https://www.proz.com/forum/subtitling/290258-how_to_get_started_in_the_subtitling_business.html

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How to get started in the subtitling business
Thread poster: Reed James

Reed James
Chile
Local time: 01:55
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Aug 28, 2015

Forgive me if this question has been asked before. I performed a thorough search and did not find it. I just recently started reading up on subtitling, and I feel that I could give a go at it. However, I need to learn more about it and do a little practice before I jump in. I already signed up for volunteer subtitling on TED, so that will be a start. However, I have no idea how to spot, and that looks very interesting albeit daunting at this point. Any and all help and/or suggestions would be gr... See more
Forgive me if this question has been asked before. I performed a thorough search and did not find it. I just recently started reading up on subtitling, and I feel that I could give a go at it. However, I need to learn more about it and do a little practice before I jump in. I already signed up for volunteer subtitling on TED, so that will be a start. However, I have no idea how to spot, and that looks very interesting albeit daunting at this point. Any and all help and/or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.Collapse


 

Georgie Scott  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 06:55
Member (2009)
French to English
+ ...
Spotting Aug 29, 2015

There is quite a lot on spotting and the actual process of creating subtitles on the internet. The BBC's subtitling guidelines, for example:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/guidelines/futuremedia/accessibility/subtitling_guides/online_sub_editorial_guidelines_vs1_1.pdf.
You can download Aegisub for free, read up on gen
... See more
There is quite a lot on spotting and the actual process of creating subtitles on the internet. The BBC's subtitling guidelines, for example:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/guidelines/futuremedia/accessibility/subtitling_guides/online_sub_editorial_guidelines_vs1_1.pdf.
You can download Aegisub for free, read up on general guidelines and then give it a go. That's probably the first thing.

There's also a really good book by Jorge Diaz Cintas (Audiovisual Translation, Subtitling) that looks at a lot of the practical linguistic issues you might encounter.

As for breaking into the business.... there are LOTS of Proz threads on this, notably this recent one: http://www.proz.com/forum/subtitling/283471-ask_me_anything_about_subtitling.html

Personally, I don't like to subtitle for less than €10 per video minute (disclaimer for potential/past/current clients: yes, I do normally ask for more). I'm sure some people would still find this unreasonably low but you'll find the whole sector is in a bit of disarray at the moment as there are many non-linguists happy to create subtitles for free, apparently out of pure love for film and TV - and sadly, respectable institutions such as TED and Coursera are all too happy to take advantage of this. I got into subtitling because I know a lot of producers and people in the film/documentary industry. Many of them are happy to pay higher rates thankfully, but I know their biggest difficulty is getting their head around the amount of time it takes to produce high-quality subtitles. When their videos finally reach me, in their mind everything is good to go and all they can think about is releasing their baby into the world - waiting another week or more is like waiting for your partner to finish faffing around in the house/bathroom when you want to leave for a big party: it's difficult to understand what's taking them so long when you finished getting ready 30 minutes ago.

Good luck. Subtitling is fascinating. It gets right to the heart of the difference between what we say and what we mean and the importance of how we say it.


I think my biggest problem now is that when I leave the cinema and someone asks me what I thought of the film, my normal response is a summary of what I thought of the subtitles.
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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 23:55
French to Spanish
+ ...
Right! Aug 29, 2015

interpretwhisky wrote:

I think my biggest problem now is that when I leave the cinema and someone asks me what I thought of the film, my normal response is a summary of what I thought of the subtitles.


And I never watch a TV program or a movie if subtitles are bad... so I don't watch TV very often!

Just one suggestion to Reed: I learned "the hard way", that is, subtitling "by ear", from scratch. No spotting, no script or dialogue list. Translation and spotting = one hour work for 10 minutes. Once you can do that and generate good subtitles, you're done! (Being perfectly bilingual, of course).

Good luck.


 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 01:55
English to Portuguese
+ ...
In memoriam
The search Aug 29, 2015

Reed, I don't know what you were searching for.

If you were searching for software, tutorials on the technical part of digital video, the right place to search is http://www.videohelp.com .

You'll discover that - for no reason I'd be able to explain - there is a lot of excellent free (or cheap) software around for video. The problem with freeware, as stated by one great programmer, is t
... See more
Reed, I don't know what you were searching for.

If you were searching for software, tutorials on the technical part of digital video, the right place to search is http://www.videohelp.com .

You'll discover that - for no reason I'd be able to explain - there is a lot of excellent free (or cheap) software around for video. The problem with freeware, as stated by one great programmer, is that usually documentation is skimpy, user interfaces are not exactly friendly, and tech support - if any is available - is found mostly on peer users groups. Bottom line is that you must know what you are doing inside out to be successful with it.

There is some pretty expensive (4 digits in USD) software for subtitling, which will be unavoidable if your clientele demands proprietary subtitle file formats. These tend to make things easier and better for you, of course, but nothing that deep knowledge cannot replace (other than those file formats).

You say you'll be starting with TED. If you compare the subtitling there with what you see on TV, you'll notice some striking differences, mainly that subtitles on TED:
- are usually single-liners, covering the entire screen width;
- are the full translation of whatever is said.

Most of TED videos comprise ONE talking head (though they usually show the speaker's entire body) all the way through. There is usually NO dialogue, NO discussion, NO chatter.

Good movie/TV subtitling is all about CONCISENESS. You must use as few characters as possible to read, in order to leave as much time as you can for the poor (=monoglot) spectator to finish reading as much of the action as possible.

My pet example is:
Original script: I hold it as my deeply ingrained opinion that...
Good subtitle: I really think that...

Finally, on the process, if you'll be covering the full nine yards in subtitling, I've divided it in three parts, briefly described here for clients. Depending on the client, they'll request one, two, or all of them.

I'd suggest you focus on one at a time, don't be afraid of trial-and-error, and develop the best strategy for each, before assembling your entire workflow. Keep in mind that there are some happy translators/subtitlers out there that don't cover all three.

[Edited at 2015-08-29 19:18 GMT]
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philgoddard
United States
Member (2009)
German to English
+ ...
A question for interpretwhisky and other subtitlers Aug 29, 2015

I do a lot of corporate videos, but I've only done one feature film.

When I watch subtitled movies, the quality is excellent 99% of the time.

But 90% of translations online and elsewhere are way less than perfect, full of grammatical errors and translationese. Some of the world's leading brands have poorly translated websites.

Why the difference, do you think?


 

philgoddard
United States
Member (2009)
German to English
+ ...
TED Aug 29, 2015

I'm in two minds about working for TED. Although it's a nonprofit, and a worthy institution, it charges a lot of money to attend the talks. It presumably pays its other suppliers, so why not translators? But I guess it would look good on your CV.

This is from Wikipedia:

"TED Open Translation Project started in May 2009, and aims to "[reach] out to the 4.5 billion people on the planet who don't speak English," according to TED Curator Chris Anderson. The OTP utilizes cro
... See more
I'm in two minds about working for TED. Although it's a nonprofit, and a worthy institution, it charges a lot of money to attend the talks. It presumably pays its other suppliers, so why not translators? But I guess it would look good on your CV.

This is from Wikipedia:

"TED Open Translation Project started in May 2009, and aims to "[reach] out to the 4.5 billion people on the planet who don't speak English," according to TED Curator Chris Anderson. The OTP utilizes crowd-based subtitling platforms to translate the text of TED and TED-Ed videos, as well as to caption and translate videos created in the TEDx program (with its technology partner dotSUB until May 2012, and recently with open source translation tool Amara). At the time of the launch, 300 translations had been done by 200 volunteer transcribers in 40 languages. In May 2015, over 70,000 sets of subtitles in 107 languages had been completed by (an all-time total of) 38,173 volunteer translators.[60]

"The project contributed to a significant increase in international visitors to TED's website, with traffic from outside the US growing 350 percent, 600 percent growth in Asia, and more than 1000 percent in South America."
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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 01:55
English to Portuguese
+ ...
In memoriam
It's too easy nowadays Aug 29, 2015

philgoddard wrote:

I do a lot of corporate videos, but I've only done one feature film.

When I watch subtitled movies, the quality is excellent 99% of the time.

But 90% of translations online and elsewhere are way less than perfect, full of grammatical errors and translationese. Some of the world's leading brands have poorly translated websites.

Why the difference, do you think?


I also specialize in corporate video, though I've done quite a few feature films and TV series.

I started with video translation for dubbing in 1987. The translation for dubbing itself is a matter of metrics, building translated phrases that will sync most of the time with the onscreen mouth movements. Otherwise, if the voice owner is off-screen, it will just have to match the rhythm. Final quality relies on the drama skills of the dubbing cast and, of course the dubbing director who will select these talents and guide them. The finishing touch, Foley, mixing, and equalizing for the different settings, is also important, of course. However dubbing relies heavily on human talent.

In those days, the hardware kernel was a U-Matic video editing suite, and the surrounding audio paraphernalia, including the soundproof recording studio. Later, the U-Matic was replaced by Betacam.

Subtitling was done by inserting a character generator and a Genlock, a device that burned those generated characters onto the image. The complete entourage was not easily affordable.

The studios I worked with for dubbing at that time did not handle subtitling. When they had subtitling requests, they threw the video over a stone wall to another vendor (who usually didn't handle dubbing), and received it finished in the same way.

I got into translation for subtitling in 2004, already in the digital video era, though VHS was still alive, agonizing. I soon discovered that subtitling had become 100% affordable to anyone who had a standard PC. No extra hardware was required.

It took me a few months to adapt my translation-for-dubbing technique and m.o. for subtitling, as well as to learn the entire process. A couple of months later, I was authoring complex interactive DVDs that streamlined video with automatic "Stop and discuss" interspersed with PPT slides (no longer in PowerPoint, of course, but converted into DVD menu screens).

Nowadays anyone can translate for subtitles, no matter how badly, break those lines of plain text, and time-spot them with abundant freeware (Subtitle Workshop, Aegisub, Media Subtitler, Subtitle Edit, and dozens of others). They may upload these subtitle files to YouTube, save them to SRT for playing on-the-fly-subtitled video with (free) VLC/VideoLAN, author subtitled DVDs with (free) DVD Flick, or burn the subs to the video with (free) VirtualDub fitted with its Subtitler plugin.

This leaves the door wide open, equally to all levels of practitioners, from top-flight masters to fledgling amateurs. Some of these amateurs do it for free, the so-called fansubbers. These do it to publish their subs on the web, so that illegal copies will be culturally accessible to non-speakers of the original language. They expect to accrue experience, in order to eventually join the paid subtitlers' mainstream. However I fail to see that happen, since nobody is ever demanding any minimum quality from them, nor giving them feedback.

Subtitled movies are usually made on the producer's or the distributor's request. They have obviously a vested interest in that project's success, to make money on sales or royalties. And so they demand top quality.

Online movies are subtitled mostly by amateurs, who do it just for the thrill of doing it, no income expected. Were these folks capable of doing anything better, they'd immediately try to move to the professionals' group.

I always recall a scene from a movie, though I don't remember what was that movie.
The dialogue goes like this:
"Look at the crap that guy is making! You must fire him immediately."
"I can't fire him; he is a volunteer."
"Really? How much do you pay such a volunteer here?"
"Nothing! That's why he is a volunteer. We pay him nothing."
"Nothing? That's exactly how much his output is worth!"

[Edited at 2015-08-29 20:41 GMT]


 

Georgie Scott  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 06:55
Member (2009)
French to English
+ ...
Undecided too Aug 29, 2015

[quote]philgoddard wrote:

I'm in two minds about working for TED. Although it's a nonprofit, and a worthy institution, it charges a lot of money to attend the talks. It presumably pays its other suppliers, so why not translators? But I guess it would look good on your CV.

This is from Wikipedia:

"TED Open Translation Project started in May 2009, and aims to "
out to the 4.5 billion people on the planet who don't speak English," according to TED Curator Chris Anderson. The OTP utilizes crowd-based subtitling platforms to translate the text of TED and TED-Ed videos, as well as to caption and translate videos created in the TEDx program (with its technology partner dotSUB until May 2012, and recently with open source translation tool Amara). At the time of the launch, 300 translations had been done by 200 volunteer transcribers in 40 languages. In May 2015, over 70,000 sets of subtitles in 107 languages had been completed by (an all-time total of) 38,173 volunteer translators.[60]

"The project contributed to a significant increase in international visitors to TED's website, with traffic from outside the US growing 350 percent, 600 percent growth in Asia, and more than 1000 percent in South America."


I don't know yet enough about how these things work or indeed how the world works to have made a final judgement on it, though my first message obviously tends to swing more towards the negative.

Even with fansubber subtitles, though they're terrible, I don't have anything against them, I just don't understand how someone would find the time to do that for free.

I'm still thinking about your other question, but José is definitely much better qualified to answer. I'm confident about the quality of my work but I'm still a relative newcomer to subtitling and dubbing (and completely blown away by José's description of the voice-over synching process - that sounds like a mammoth task!).

Actually, I meant to say that José is the one to speak to about this but was in a bit of hurry. But for getting an idea of the whole process works, it still seems to me that looking at the guidelines and having a go is a good start.


 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 01:55
English to Portuguese
+ ...
In memoriam
Fansubbing, subbing and dubbing Aug 30, 2015

interpretwhisky wrote:

Even with fansubber subtitles, though they're terrible, I don't have anything against them, I just don't understand how someone would find the time to do that for free.


For the same reason that there are people uploading movies illegally to the web, as well as using their programming skills to develop and spread computer viruses. They feel rewarded from fighting the status quo, whatever it be.

I heard that in the beginning NetFlix was using fansubs. Maybe they were conned by people who charged them for translation & time-spotting, and delivered these fansubs. I've heard that they are more demanding now.

interpretwhisky wrote:
I'm still thinking about your other question, but José is definitely much better qualified to answer. I'm confident about the quality of my work but I'm still a relative newcomer to subtitling and dubbing (and completely blown away by José's description of the voice-over synching process - that sounds like a mammoth task!).

Actually, I meant to say that José is the one to speak to about this but was in a bit of hurry. But for getting an idea of the whole process works, it still seems to me that looking at the guidelines and having a go is a good start.


IMHO, as I do both, the key difference in translating for dubbing and subtitling is in the FRAME OF MIND.

Translation for dubbing strives for metrics (i.e. lip-sync). Though it's ancient, and has been deliberately downgraded, I particularly like the first video clip sample on this page, because most of it is in close-up, and the dubbing studio (I still work with them as often as I can, been doing it for almost 30 years) was particularly brilliant, made it a masterpiece. The original video was spoken in English, it's dubbed in Brazilian Portuguese.

Meanwhile translation for subtitling seeks conciseness, for the reasons I've explained on a previous post here.

Both use similar tools for translation and, while some consider one (usually dubbing) more difficult than the other, and hence charge accordingly, I charge exactly the same per minute of playing time. The Brazilian Translators' Syndicate suggests charging the translation for dubbing twice as much as the same for subtitling!

In most cases, translation for dubbing ends right there, at the translation. The dubbing director takes it over.

Translation for subtitling MAY stop right there, or it may include time-spotting. Not so many translators that I know offer subtitles burning and/or DVD authoring.

The dubbing process is complex, involves several people, it would be too long to describe here.


 

Reed James
Chile
Local time: 01:55
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Sounds like the beginning Aug 31, 2015

interpretwhisky wrote:

There is quite a lot on spotting and the actual process of creating subtitles on the internet. The BBC's subtitling guidelines, for example:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/guidelines/futuremedia/accessibility/subtitling_guides/online_sub_editorial_guidelines_vs1_1.pdf.
You can download Aegisub for free, read up on general guidelines and then give it a go. That's probably the first thing.

There's also a really good book by Jorge Diaz Cintas (Audiovisual Translation, Subtitling) that looks at a lot of the practical linguistic issues you might encounter.

As for breaking into the business.... there are LOTS of Proz threads on this, notably this recent one: http://www.proz.com/forum/subtitling/283471-ask_me_anything_about_subtitling.html

Personally, I don't like to subtitle for less than €10 per video minute (disclaimer for potential/past/current clients: yes, I do normally ask for more). I'm sure some people would still find this unreasonably low but you'll find the whole sector is in a bit of disarray at the moment as there are many non-linguists happy to create subtitles for free, apparently out of pure love for film and TV - and sadly, respectable institutions such as TED and Coursera are all too happy to take advantage of this. I got into subtitling because I know a lot of producers and people in the film/documentary industry. Many of them are happy to pay higher rates thankfully, but I know their biggest difficulty is getting their head around the amount of time it takes to produce high-quality subtitles. When their videos finally reach me, in their mind everything is good to go and all they can think about is releasing their baby into the world - waiting another week or more is like waiting for your partner to finish faffing around in the house/bathroom when you want to leave for a big party: it's difficult to understand what's taking them so long when you finished getting ready 30 minutes ago.

Good luck. Subtitling is fascinating. It gets right to the heart of the difference between what we say and what we mean and the importance of how we say it.


I think my biggest problem now is that when I leave the cinema and someone asks me what I thought of the film, my normal response is a summary of what I thought of the subtitles.



Interpretwhiskey:

Thank you for the advice. I have already purchased the book you mentioned. Luckily, it is available as a Kindle book. I'm also going to go through all the subtitling threads. I'm sure that TED is not the best option out there for subtitling, but where else would you suggest getting my feet wet? I certainly don't want to start out cold with the client only to realize that my subtitling skills are not up to par.

However, I'm confident that I can do this kind of work because having learned Spanish and being a native speaker of English, I'm familiar with spoken dialogue in both languages. I'm further compelled to do this kind of work because of the need for concision. It sounds like a lot of fun to condense the SL message in the TL message. I also think that going through a film with a fine-tooth comb would mean that the subtitler would understand it much more in depth than the average moviegoer. At least this is what happens with written translation.


 

Reed James
Chile
Local time: 01:55
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
one thing at a time Aug 31, 2015

Juan Jacob wrote:


Just one suggestion to Reed: I learned "the hard way", that is, subtitling "by ear", from scratch. No spotting, no script or dialogue list. Translation and spotting = one hour work for 10 minutes. Once you can do that and generate good subtitles, you're done! (Being perfectly bilingual, of course).

Good luck.


Juan Jacob:

I see what you're getting at, but isn't it easier to start with just one component of subtitling? It seems like if I did both spotting and translating, I'd get more confused, at least at the beginning…


 

Reed James
Chile
Local time: 01:55
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Let me rephrase the question Aug 31, 2015

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:

Reed, I don't know what you were searching for.

If you were searching for software, tutorials on the technical part of digital video, the right place to search is http://www.videohelp.com .

You'll discover that - for no reason I'd be able to explain - there is a lot of excellent free (or cheap) software around for video. The problem with freeware, as stated by one great programmer, is that usually documentation is skimpy, user interfaces are not exactly friendly, and tech support - if any is available - is found mostly on peer users groups. Bottom line is that you must know what you are doing inside out to be successful with it.


José: First of all, everyone's got to start someplace. Obviously, I'm not going to spend a lot of money (hopefully none at all) on software or anything else at the beginning of my subtitling venture. I'm not even sure what the market is for Spanish into English. As far as I understand, the main impetus for subtitling is out of English-the obvious reason that Hollywood makes movies in English. This, of course, is yet another angle that I must explore.

You say you'll be starting with TED. If you compare the subtitling there with what you see on TV, you'll notice some striking differences, mainly that subtitles on TED:
- are usually single-liners, covering the entire screen width;
- are the full translation of whatever is said.

Most of TED videos comprise ONE talking head (though they usually show the speaker's entire body) all the way through. There is usually NO dialogue, NO discussion, NO chatter.


Okay, I get that part. I hear you loud and clear. Let me just ask you, José: what were you doing on day one of your subtitling career? Who are you working for? Did you get paid or volunteer?

Finally, on the process, if you'll be covering the full nine yards in subtitling, I've divided it in three parts, briefly described here for clients. Depending on the client, they'll request one, two, or all of them.

I'd suggest you focus on one at a time, don't be afraid of trial-and-error, and develop the best strategy for each, before assembling your entire workflow. Keep in mind that there are some happy translators/subtitlers out there that don't cover all three.

[Edited at 2015-08-29 19:18 GMT]


Thanks for all your advice, José. I will definitely be looking into your subtitling tutorial among many other things. I see step one of this process as reading up on the subject. Step two will be going through each process separately, hopefully with some feedback, and somewhere down the road, get a paying job. What say you?


 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 01:55
English to Portuguese
+ ...
In memoriam
So I'll rephrase the answers :-D Aug 31, 2015

Reed D James wrote:

José: First of all, everyone's got to start someplace. Obviously, I'm not going to spend a lot of money (hopefully none at all) on software or anything else at the beginning of my subtitling venture. I'm not even sure what the market is for Spanish into English. As far as I understand, the main impetus for subtitling is out of English-the obvious reason that Hollywood makes movies in English. This, of course, is yet another angle that I must explore.


My point was that while there is NO decent free software for DVD authoring, nor DTP, and several other purposes, after all these years, I'm subtitling video mostly with free or cheapware. For the record:
a) I tried programs with different price tags, and still preferred the free ones, even if I had to pay a USD 3-digit figure for them; and
b) I do know my way inside out audio and video in the dark (I actually practiced threading a 16 mm film through a Victor Kalart projector - not the usual Bell & Howell - until I was able to do it blindfolded in less than 20 seconds; this should give you an idea).

So while some old hands will tell you that you'll never be a pro using freeware, or without the $$$$ software, I am.

Reed D James wrote:

Okay, I get that part. I hear you loud and clear. Let me just ask you, José: what were you doing on day one of your subtitling career? Who are you working for? Did you get paid or volunteer?


Let's start with how I got started in translation for dubbing.

In 1987 I had been translating and DTP'ing the printed material for a training video distributor here, and he invited me to try my hand at translating video for dubbing. He showed me how he did it, I developed my own method based on his, and we discovered a talent I had never imagined I could have. My very first video was dubbed exactly as I translated it, verbatim.

Once they asked me to try translating for subtitling, still in the lotsa-hardware days. My output came out quite TED-like, as I can put it today, so I dropped it.

In 2004 another client, who used my translation for dubbing services, got into trouble. He got a large assignment of technical videos to translate into English and subtitle. He couldn't find a more suitable translator, so he hired me to do do it, and would get someone to fix whatever was necessary. We had plenty of time.

I took the chance to study subtitling, both in theory, as well as keenly observing the professional output on TV. I got so well prepared, that no fixing was necessary. Yet they were still doing it in the lotsa-hardware analog (tape-based) way. In my studies, I discovered that digital video had empowered me to do it on my standard PC. It was the shifting time.

Of course, LOTS of trial-and-errors, at first more failures than successes, but some four months later I was happily doing the entire process, and most of all, my clients were just as happy with the results too!

Reed D James wrote:

Thanks for all your advice, José. I will definitely be looking into your subtitling tutorial among many other things. I see step one of this process as reading up on the subject. Step two will be going through each process separately, hopefully with some feedback, and somewhere down the road, get a paying job. What say you?


Mine is not a tutorial, merely an explanation to clients, so they'll understand why it can't be done instantly with a magic wand. You'll find tutorials on how-to at Videohelp.com regarding the use of software, the technique. However you'll have to develop the art too.

Many people want to do subtitling because they get a kick of watching movies at work. Quite honestly, it's not so much fun all the time. I've translated and subtitled videos that I weshed that the'd never been produced. It's all in a day's work.


 

Georgie Scott  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 06:55
Member (2009)
French to English
+ ...
TED seems ok Sep 1, 2015




Interpretwhiskey:

Thank you for the advice. I have already purchased the book you mentioned. Luckily, it is available as a Kindle book. I'm also going to go through all the subtitling threads. I'm sure that TED is not the best option out there for subtitling, but where else would you suggest getting my feet wet? I certainly don't want to start out cold with the client only to realize that my subtitling skills are not up to par.

However, I'm confident that I can do this kind of work because having learned Spanish and being a native speaker of English, I'm familiar with spoken dialogue in both languages. I'm further compelled to do this kind of work because of the need for concision. It sounds like a lot of fun to condense the SL message in the TL message. I also think that going through a film with a fine-tooth comb would mean that the subtitler would understand it much more in depth than the average moviegoer. At least this is what happens with written translation.


TED seems fine to me. I'm afraid I'm Scottish so I tend to sound like I'm moaning/being negative when I'm not.

At least then you've got a deadline and pressure. But there's nothing to stop you taking any video from anywhere, setting yourself a strict deadline and just subtitling it for yourself. There's also no reason why you can't use the finished subtitles as portfolio examples when you feel confident enough to approach clients (unless you lie and pretend you were specifically asked to do them).

As for getting clients, that's another story. I'm pretty happy with the amount of subtilting work I get mostly by chance, so I've never made too much of an active effort to search for it.


 

Georgie Scott  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 06:55
Member (2009)
French to English
+ ...
Free software Sep 2, 2015

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:



My point was that while there is NO decent free software for DVD authoring, nor DTP, and several other purposes, after all these years, I'm subtitling video mostly with free or cheapware. For the record:
a) I tried programs with different price tags, and still preferred the free ones, even if I had to pay a USD 3-digit figure for them; and
b) I do know my way inside out audio and video in the dark (I actually practiced threading a 16 mm film through a Victor Kalart projector - not the usual Bell & Howell - until I was able to do it blindfolded in less than 20 seconds; this should give you an idea).

So while some old hands will tell you that you'll never be a pro using freeware, or without the $$$$ software, I am.



That's really interesting to hear. Good news!


 
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Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

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TM-Town
Manage your TMs and Terms ... and boost your translation business

Are you ready for something fresh in the industry? TM-Town is a unique new site for you -- the freelance translator -- to store, manage and share translation memories (TMs) and glossaries...and potentially meet new clients on the basis of your prior work.

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