how long does it take to create a subtitling file?
Thread poster: aventura22

aventura22  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 22:47
English to Swedish
+ ...
Mar 3, 2016

I have always been given a file in English or Danish and then I just had to change the text to Swedish. But now someone wanted me to subtitle a video without sending me a .srt or .ass file. How much longer would this take? How much should I ask for if they previously has paid me 4 Euro per minute?

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Sergei Leshchinsky  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 23:47
Member (2008)
English to Russian
+ ...
José Henrique Lamensdorf Mar 3, 2016

says the time ratio is 1:6

Direct link Reply with quote
 

IT Pros Subs
Italy
Local time: 22:47
Member (2005)
English to Italian
+ ...
Not just a matter of extra time... Mar 3, 2016

...but most of all extra skills, that you can't acquire overnight...

My two cents.

Monica


Direct link Reply with quote
 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 17:47
English to Portuguese
+ ...
OOPS! Correction... Mar 3, 2016

Sergei Leshchinsky wrote:

José Henrique Lamensdorf says the time ratio is 1:6


I mean the ratio is 1:6 to TRANSLATE script-less video from audio, using either my retired open-reel tape recorders or Express Scribe, without much care for spelling at this stage, and breaking lines at pauses for breathing, as much as possible.

After that, there is checking, time-spotting while reviewing and formatting (italics, colors, if required, merging & splitting, etc.), fine-adjusting tight spots, final quality control.

I've had contact with many experienced video translators who allegedly keep this 1:6 ratio (i.e. it takes one hour to translate 10 minutes of playing time) for translating. One rate buster said she keeps it 1:5, and on the other end I've heard of another translator who makes a living from this with a 1:12 ratio.

Keep in mind that it's a somewhat tiresome activity, so you need some breaks. I wouldn't commit to doing more than one hour of video playing time per day... and I've been doing it since 1987.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

aventura22  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 22:47
English to Swedish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
My question is: Mar 3, 2016

OK, my question is:
How much longer would it take to translate everything from scratch and to create an .srt file from nothing (just a video), I would have to create the subtitles and decide how long they will appear for etc. Compared to if I get an srt file where I already have the time codes and the text in English and I only have to translate everything?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 17:47
English to Portuguese
+ ...
It depends... Mar 3, 2016

aventura22 wrote:

OK, my question is:
How much longer would it take to translate everything from scratch and to create an .srt file from nothing (just a video), I would have to create the subtitles and decide how long they will appear for etc. Compared to if I get an srt file where I already have the time codes and the text in English and I only have to translate everything?


This will depend A LOT on...
  • your knowledge of the subtitling process
  • your practice/experience in doing it (including conciseness, breaks, etc.)
  • the software you use
  • your skill in using this software
  • the video format provided (MOV sucks on a PC, WMV sucks on a Mac), or that you'll use after conversion (which may take a while)
  • the video itself (win on some, lose on some)
  • the "cast" (i.e. trained actors vs. ad-libbing John Does)
  • the audio quality (i.e. studio recording vs. smartphone camera on the street or worse)
  • the level of quality required
    ... plus other variables.

    Call any mechanic and ask them how long does it will take you to fix an automatic transmission, without giving out any clues on your skills. Try to force them into guessing.

    If you already have the SRT in EN, that depends on your speed as a translator, plus the time it will take you to avoid botching up the in/out times.

    Direct link Reply with quote
     

  • IT Pros Subs
    Italy
    Local time: 22:47
    Member (2005)
    English to Italian
    + ...
    Too long Mar 4, 2016

    Your very question makes me think it would take you too long and your client would not be happy with the result. To start subtitling at a professional level you need training! It's not something you do out of the blue. In your case, I'd be honest enough to inform my client that I'm not proficient in spotting so I'd recommend choosing an experienced professional.

    [Edited at 2016-03-04 06:44 GMT]


    Direct link Reply with quote
     

    jbjb  Identity Verified
    Estonia
    Local time: 23:47
    Estonian to English
    + ...
    not worth Mar 9, 2016

    Creating subtitles is a completely new skill that needs maybe 100-200 hours of practice before you become proficient and fast.
    So for you the question is - how many jobs like this do you expect to have? If it is a few, don't waste your time. If it will be regular, by all means, spend those 100-200 hours to learn how to do it and how to do it fast.

    The probable answer is - if you want to create your own timecode + subtitles from scratch, then
    1) for the first time you do this, plan about 20 hours of work for 1 hour of video.
    2) when you do this for the 100th time, you can plan 4 hours of work for 1 hour of video

    In subtitling, experience can make you work at least 5 times faster.


    Direct link Reply with quote
     
    kmtext
    United Kingdom
    Local time: 21:47
    English
    + ...
    It all depends Mar 9, 2016

    There are a lot of factors that affect how long it takes to subtitle a programme, so you can't really generalise.

    If you have good, clear audio and the participants/actors enunciate clearly and speak in coherent sentences, it's much quicker than if you have a lot of background noise and speakers who mumble and mutter, don't speak in sentences, or if they use slang and jargon that you have to research.

    The type of programme is also a factor. If you're working on a film, that's going to be quicker and easier to do than a chat/talk show where you have lots of participants all talking over each other and referring back to what someone said that wasn't very clear so you left it out, but because they did, you have to go back and re-edit to include it so that the subsequent comments make sense.

    I've been subtitling and translating for over 20 years, and can occasionally do a one-hour programme in three to four hours, but that doesn't happen often. It usually takes 8-16 hours depending on the content.


    Direct link Reply with quote
     


    To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


    You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

    how long does it take to create a subtitling file?

    Advanced search







    memoQ translator pro
    Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

    With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

    More info »
    TM-Town
    Manage your TMs and Terms ... and boost your translation business

    Are you ready for something fresh in the industry? TM-Town is a unique new site for you -- the freelance translator -- to store, manage and share translation memories (TMs) and glossaries...and potentially meet new clients on the basis of your prior work.

    More info »



    Forums
    • All of ProZ.com
    • Term search
    • Jobs
    • Forums
    • Multiple search