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Movies and Series in a Resume
Thread poster: Sheila Rivaben

Sheila Rivaben  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:36
Italian to English
+ ...
Mar 15, 2016

Good morning to you all!!

I've been a freelance translator for 6 years now, and I've worked mainly on technical translations and subtitles for movies and TV series.

Recently, I've worked a lot in the subtitle industry, and I would like to expand my work in this area. I'm currently creating a new resume, just for subtitling jobs.

I was wondering if it's appropriate to include the titles of the movies and series I translated for past jobs, without mentioning the agency, or film studio, which assigned them to me.

I'd like to include them in order to be more specific on what kind of materials I've worked on, in order to attract new possible clients.

Thank you for your help!!


 

Thayenga  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:36
Member (2009)
English to German
+ ...
It depends Mar 15, 2016

Hello Sheila,

whether or not you can mention the titles in your business brochure depends mainly on the agreement(s) you have with your clients. If you had to sign an NDA prior to starting the project, then you can't "just go ahead" and mention the titles. If nothing to that regard had been agreed upon, then you might still want to ask your clients.icon_smile.gif

Best,

Thayenga


 

Max Deryagin  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 02:36
Member (2013)
English to Russian
- Mar 15, 2016

Sheila Rivaben wrote:

Good morning to you all!!

I've been a freelance translator for 6 years now, and I've worked mainly on technical translations and subtitles for movies and TV series.

Recently, I've worked a lot in the subtitle industry, and I would like to expand my work in this area. I'm currently creating a new resume, just for subtitling jobs.

I was wondering if it's appropriate to include the titles of the movies and series I translated for past jobs, without mentioning the agency, or film studio, which assigned them to me.

I'd like to include them in order to be more specific on what kind of materials I've worked on, in order to attract new possible clients.

Thank you for your help!!


Hi Sheila,

But of course! Your subtitles are your intellectual property, and unless you signed NDAs that openly prohibit you from doing so, you can (and should) list your titles in your resume.


 

Sheila Rivaben  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:36
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks! Mar 15, 2016

Thanks so much for your answers!

I don't recall signing anything of the sort, but I'll check all the agreements just to be sure.

I think that, in the subtitling field in particular, is very important that my prospective new clients know what kind of genres I'm good at, and also that they can see I have a fair amount of experience in the field. This is why I wanted to mention them. In my opinion, it seemed more professional, than just having a random resume saying "I did 1000 hours of subtitles of action movies."icon_biggrin.gif


 

Monica Paolillo
Italy
Local time: 23:36
Member (2005)
English to Italian
+ ...
Check your NDAs Mar 15, 2016

That said, I have to remind you, Sheila, that there are multiple subtitling versions for the same features. Odd as it may seem, for the same movie you will have subtitles for the DVD version, subtitles for the Blu-ray version, subtitles for the DVD/Blu-ray versions for this or that market specifically, subtitles for iTunes, subtitles for this or that film festival, subtitles for Netflix et cetera. This is due to some hysterical practice in the industry where nobody seems to happy to pay fair subtitling rates, but they all seem to be ready to pay 5 or 6 times for the same service.
Whenever I receive any resumes with a list of titles that really gives me no clue whatsoever about the quality of the applicant until I ask, "okay, which version, though". So I'm not sure including a list in your CV will be so productive as you may expect. Also, in my case, the list would be too long and I'd risk getting my potential client bored rather than interested. Remember, a CV should be synthetical, otherwise nobody will read it. Just my two cents. Good luckicon_smile.gif

[Edited at 2016-03-15 13:18 GMT]


 

Sheila Rivaben  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:36
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Not sure if general NDA apply... Mar 15, 2016

I went and re-read the NDA agreements. They do not expressly state that I cannot include the titles in my resume (if this is a thing, in any case). They do, however, state that "Any use of the intellectual property including without limitation the copyrights, trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, Website or Content without the express written consent of ------ or the owner of said intellectual property, as applicable, is strictly prohibited."

I'm puzzled.... On the one hand, I'm not using the titles for commercial reasons, so it shouldn't be a problem; on the other hand, I'm using those titles in resumes I'm sending to other agencies/film studios, etc....

My common sense tells me it shouldn't be a problem, since I'm not using any direct content.... But I wouldn't want to be sued over a resume...


 

Sheila Rivaben  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:36
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
@Monica Mar 15, 2016

Yes, of course, you're perfectly right.

I was just trying to experiment with new ways to write a resume, other than the old boring resume formats, and I thought it could be a good idea. But what you're saying makes perfect sense.
I, too, already ended up having a 4 page list, and I'm not even halfway through.

I guess, maybe, I could list some titles (if in the end it turns out I can, without being arrested for iticon_biggrin.gif), and then maybe I will just list an overall experience in the different fields, maybe adding approximate hours of work or something.

Thanks for you help!!

[Modificato alle 2016-03-15 13:38 GMT]

[Modificato alle 2016-03-15 13:39 GMT]


 

jbjb  Identity Verified
Estonia
Local time: 00:36
Estonian to English
+ ...
of course Mar 15, 2016

You can of course name some of the titles. For each movie and TV series, there are numerous official translations. Not for hysterical reasons but because of competition between translation providers.

Movies and films are not licensed with existing translations, so the initial translation used in cinema is usually different from the DVD and each time the films/series are licensed to TV channels, they will make their own translations - because everyone would use a different subtitling company who does not want to buy translations from competitors.

But if you are working for international companies, then you no longer have the rights to translations themselves. With the exception of France, where translators still remain authors, you lose any copyright to your translations as soon as you hand them in (I like it how some contracts now say "in perpetuity" and "in the whole universe", not "for 50 years on planet Earth" that is equally restrictive and was common 10-15 years ago).


 

deryaun (X)  Identity Verified
Turkey
English to Turkish
Subtitle ownership Mar 16, 2016

Max Deryagin wrote:

It is your international intellectual property, regardless of any article of any Client contract forcing you not to claim any right. Any legal article can not be above Law.

By the way, dont worry about CV too much because Netflix goes Turkey:
They need eng-tur dubbing and subtitling work desperately, present and future work enough for everybody!
check it out -->
http://www.dailysabah.com/expats-corner/2016/01/12/what-to-watch-netflix-takes-off-in-turkey

Good Luck
Derya

Sheila Rivaben wrote:

Good morning to you all!!

I've been a freelance translator for 6 years now, and I've worked mainly on technical translations and subtitles for movies and TV series.

Recently, I've worked a lot in the subtitle industry, and I would like to expand my work in this area. I'm currently creating a new resume, just for subtitling jobs.

I was wondering if it's appropriate to include the titles of the movies and series I translated for past jobs, without mentioning the agency, or film studio, which assigned them to me.

I'd like to include them in order to be more specific on what kind of materials I've worked on, in order to attract new possible clients.

Thank you for your help!!


Hi Sheila,

But of course! Your subtitles are your intellectual property, and unless you signed NDAs that openly prohibit you from doing so, you can (and should) list your titles in your resume.


 

Bernhard Sulzer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:36
English to German
+ ...
I am not an applicant with a resume looking for employment Mar 16, 2016

Sheila Rivaben wrote:

Yes, of course, you're perfectly right.

I was just trying to experiment with new ways to write a resume, other than the old boring resume formats, and I thought it could be a good idea. But what you're saying makes perfect sense.
I, too, already ended up having a 4 page list, and I'm not even halfway through.

I guess, maybe, I could list some titles (if in the end it turns out I can, without being arrested for iticon_biggrin.gif), and then maybe I will just list an overall experience in the different fields, maybe adding approximate hours of work or something.

Thanks for you help!!

[Modificato alle 2016-03-15 13:38 GMT]

[Modificato alle 2016-03-15 13:39 GMT]


You strike me as someone who sees herself as an "applicant" for a job rather than a service provider or contractor. I recommend focusing instead on your own website (separate from and besides Proz.com) and on better, professional rates for your services. I don't provide resumes anymore, security being a very important issue anyway (risk of theft and people using your resume to get projects and then giving them to someone else), but it's mainly because I'm not "applying" for a job. I run my service as a business for "clients." Of course, that also means that I work less and less for agencies because many of them see translators as willing "applicants" or "bidders" for their cheap jobs. And there are plenty of those outsourcers and willing translators. I refuse to provide excellent services to cheap outsourcers who only profit from how cheaply some translators give away their skills and knowledge. Remember, you are a skilled translator that provides sophisticated language services. That's an important point especially with regard to subtitling and other services for film and TV. Price expectations there by agencies are most often very unrealistic. And don't get me started on NDAs.

[Edited at 2016-03-16 02:52 GMT]


 

Sheila Rivaben  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:36
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
@Bernard Mar 16, 2016

I value your point of view, and you're right in some cases. For technical translations, I'm trying to work more and more with direct clients, although I do not believe that working with agencies is always a total loss for us. I'm currently working only with those agencies that accept my rates, and that support me with a series of services that would cost me time and money; so, in the end, their services integrate my work and allow me to spend less time focusing on secondary aspects (reformatting a document, just to say one, takes me a lot of time, and I don't love it. Even though I charge clients for this service, I'd rather not do it at all, as it is a huge loss of time). I have a website and, even though I don't update it as much as I should, I use it to attract new clients.

But my doubt here is strictly for subtitling jobs. Pardon my ignorance, but until now I haven't seen many opportunities to work in this field without some sort of agency or studio, be it a translation agency, a dubbing studio, or else. I see it as another field altogether, compared to technical translations, with its own set of rules. This is why I thought (maybe wrongly) that a well-made resume would be essential, or, at least, help a bit.


Thanks for your replies and your help!


 

Sheila Rivaben  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:36
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
@Deryagin Mar 16, 2016

Thank you so much for your post! Unfortunately, I currently do not speak any Turkishicon_biggrin.gif

Thanks for the update, though!


 

Bernhard Sulzer  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:36
English to German
+ ...
Rates Mar 16, 2016

Sheila Rivaben wrote:

I value your point of view, and you're right in some cases. For technical translations, I'm trying to work more and more with direct clients, although I do not believe that working with agencies is always a total loss for us. I'm currently working only with those agencies that accept my rates, ...


But your rates ...
Even the standard rates published by Proz.com here (which I consider low) are at least EUR .10/word in your language pair.

http://search.proz.com/employers/rates

And there are people that provide subtitling translations per video minute for 2, 3, or 5 Euros. Hope you're not one of them. The standards that should be upheld in our profession as in any other comparable occupation (doctors, lawyers, academics, etc.) get trampled on every day.
Not telling you what you should charge or accept, just telling you that I have no respect for bottom feeders.

PS: I know this isn't exactly about writing or sending out resumes, which I addressed earlier. But these two phrases often go hand in hand on job boards: "Send us your resume/CV and best rates." I don't have to translate what this really means.

[Edited at 2016-03-16 13:29 GMT] Ed. for typo.

[Edited at 2016-03-16 13:42 GMT]


 

Sheila Rivaben  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:36
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks, Berhard Mar 16, 2016

But I don't think my post had nothing to do with rates. On this matter, I truly think that it is a really really personal matter, and I wouldn't want to discuss it in a post that has nothing to do with it. I think we're all small business owners, and that we should pursue our jobs with our prospective and existing clients in the manner we see more fit.

Personally, even though I surely agree with you on bottom rates, I think everyone should calculate their rates depending on how much work you actually can get done in a day/week/month. After all, it is your job, and in the end is all about what income you can make.
But this is just my opinion, of course.

Have a nice day!


 

Sylvano
Local time: 23:36
English to French
Interesting precision... Mar 16, 2016

without mentioning the agency, or film studio, which assigned them to me


Interesting you wrote that. I wonder what would really be the point naming those movies/series in your resume: what does it say at all about the quality of your work? Especially without naming the studios or companies hiring you? Let's say I subtitled a blockbuster on a DVD... for a big bad company paying peanuts and which is not quality-oriented (yes, I'm being euphemistic)?


 
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