Timecoding/cueing
Thread poster: maker

maker
Sweden
Local time: 16:31
Member (2007)
English to Swedish
+ ...
May 7, 2007

Ok. Let´s try again... Anyone out there who would like to write a comment on whether it is possible to learn it on your own or not? If you did, how long did it take you to learn how to do it well?

I have TitleVision. The manual is not too detailed about how to do it, I feel, "it" sort of assumes that you know everything already.


 

hazlinda76  Identity Verified
Malaysia
Local time: 22:31
English to Malay
Yes, it's possible. May 7, 2007

I can't exactly say how long it will take but as you go along, you'll be more familiar with doing it that your speed will also increase.

Never used TitleVisione before, so can't comment on it.

[Edited at 2007-05-07 21:38]


 

Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 09:31
French to Spanish
+ ...
Depends on software. May 7, 2007

Don't know TitleVision, though.
Depends on software.
Anyway: cueing should not take more than one day to learn.
That is: Time In, Time Out. Simple, very important and very boring.


 

maker
Sweden
Local time: 16:31
Member (2007)
English to Swedish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Ok May 8, 2007

Thank you for your comments, now I will try and learn on my own.
Would be interesting to find out what other programs there are out there, that might have more informative manuals...

[Edited at 2007-05-08 07:16]


 

Pierre Bancov  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:31
Member (2008)
Japanese to French
+ ...
It should be easy May 8, 2007

I remember trying with several softwares before and there was one of them where you would only need to press space for each time-in and time-out. It required a lot of RAM to run, but once you got the video running, 2 or 3 tries were all it took to have the cue.

 

juvera  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:31
English to Hungarian
+ ...
One more comment May 11, 2007

It is quite possible to learn on your own, but the art is not in pressing "space", but to know WHEN to press space.

If you have some experience of subtitling, you came accross recommended parametres, like min./max. lenght of time for a subtitle, optimal time between subtitles, speed of reading in various languages, the influence of typeface on the reading speed, etc.

If you are totally new to all this, you better find a good book on subtitling, and study it. The technical part depends on the software program, but it is not very difficult.

Good luck.


 

maker
Sweden
Local time: 16:31
Member (2007)
English to Swedish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Ok May 12, 2007

juvera wrote:

If you are totally new to all this, you better find a good book on subtitling, and study it. The technical part depends on the software program, but it is not very difficult.

Good luck.


Yes, I certainly have experience from subtitling, but timecoding has not been necessary until now.
Ok, I think I am beginning to get a hang of it now.
Thank you.


 


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