Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
"r" in Spanish
Thread poster: xxxwonita
xxxwonita
China
Local time: 17:55
Apr 21, 2008

I love the tone and the melody of the Spanish language. I try very hard to learn it, so that I may talk this language with its beautiful crisp rhythm (Do you understand me?!) some day. But my spanish teacher, una señora de Malaga, told me, for someone who does not have the consonant "r" in her mother tongue, it is nearly impossible to pronounce it perfectly.

Is it true?

Bin


Direct link Reply with quote
 

GoodWords  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 15:55
Spanish to English
+ ...
Try it yourself... Apr 21, 2008

...but be patient; keep trying and don't give up if it doesn't work the first time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuAuZe61sSY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDVWogLNRMI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkpddOllrNI

See also many additional videos on the right-hand side under "Related Videos".


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 23:55
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Take a teacher Apr 21, 2008

Not all natives manage it, the same problem is in Finnish and Russian. I believe Boris Yeltsin could not roll his r's, or was it Gorba? Children get individual lessons at school at least here in Finland.
I cannot roll my rs either, but most of the time I can fake it. The other way round: it sounds silly if people roll their r's in languages like German or French.
A good teacher can do miracles. That's why opera singers are able to sing many languages almost free of accent.
Cheers
Heinrich


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxwonita
China
Local time: 17:55
TOPIC STARTER
Not so, at least in Bavaria Apr 21, 2008

Heinrich Pesch wrote:
I cannot roll my rs either, but most of the time I can fake it. The other way round: it sounds silly if people roll their r's in languages like German or French.
Cheers
Heinrich


The Bavarians do pronounce the German R with rolling tongues. They have little problem to make a "r" like a real Spaniard.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Erik Freitag  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:55
Member (2006)
Dutch to German
+ ...
Rolled r's Apr 21, 2008

Bin Tiede wrote:

Heinrich Pesch wrote:
it sounds silly if people roll their r's in languages like German or French.


The Bavarians do pronounce the German R with rolling tongues.


Yes, indeed, they do. And it sounds silly, like Heinrich said



[Bearbeitet am 2008-04-21 17:55]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Margreet Logmans  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 22:55
English to Dutch
+ ...
Try this Apr 21, 2008

I once had lessons in speaking in public, and articulation was an important part of it. I was told to practise the 'r' by saying a series of 'd' (d-d-d-d-d-d-d-d)

I assume you don't speak Dutch, but you could try by using the German 'Arbeit'.
Say: Ad-d-d-d-d-d-d-dbeit a hundred times. You don't need to do this very fast, just practise the movements. It might help, it worked for me. Of course, this is the 'tongue-r'.
There is another way to form the 'r' (in the back of your mouth), but I don't know how that is done (even if I can use it myself).

Good luck!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
David Brown  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:55
Spanish to English
Rolling r's Apr 21, 2008

As a Scot I roll my r's. But I had to re-learn in Spain. The reason was I lived in England for so long I had to adapt as some people said they could not understand me!!

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Manuela Junghans  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:55
Member (2004)
English to German
+ ...
I beg your pardon... Apr 21, 2008

efreitag (and Heinrich)

I take the silly Bavarian "r" was meant as a joke

It´s probably envy

It makes pronouncing Spanish and understanding the Scots much easier. As a Bavarian I like the rolled Scottish "r"s, David.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxOlaf
Local time: 22:55
English to German
There are some exercises Apr 21, 2008

You could try the following common excercise. Quickly say nonsense words containing t followed by d. E.g. Tedip or T'dip. If you say this often and fast enough, you'll end up with an rolling "r"instead of a "d" and it will sound like "trip".

You can find many other methods here:
http://www.wikihow.com/Roll-Your-"R"s

Olaf


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jessie LN
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:55
Spanish to English
+ ...
rrrr Apr 21, 2008

For me, the single "r" is fine, but the double one is a nightmare! It has gotten better though through exposure to the language and huge amounts of practice!

I doubt it is "impossible" to learn. It just takes time and effort.

[Edited at 2008-04-21 21:40]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Taylor Kirk  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 15:55
Portuguese to English
+ ...
Scots and Spanish Apr 21, 2008

David Brown wrote:

As a Scot I roll my r's. But I had to re-learn in Spain. The reason was I lived in England for so long I had to adapt as some people said they could not understand me!!


As a Scottish American I always wondered how Scots would handle learning Spanish! Interesting.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 14:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
For some it's hard Apr 21, 2008

If your native language is Chinese, any kind of "R" is hard to pronounce, and might come out "L" instead. It is actually true that even some native Spanish-speakers have that problem, and those from the area of Málaga may be among them, but I do not recall specifically because it has been a long time since I have been there. Others, such as Puerto Ricans, tend to pronounce "RR" more like a French or German version.

But it can be learned with exercises and practice.

Here we pronounce it correctly.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Clarisa Moraña  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 17:55
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Very difficult but... Apr 22, 2008

If the teacher has knowledge of phonetics and phonology, he/she might be able to explain the articulation process, the place of articulation, (the tongue tip rolling on the alveolar region), tell you the required movements, and help you to pronounce correctly the sound.
The same for us, Spanish speaking, our vowels sound different to the French and English vowels, we do not differenciate between "v" and "b", but a good teacher, and our effort, will lead to a good pronounciation.

Kind regards

Clarisa


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:55
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Practice makes perfect Apr 22, 2008

As with learning any skill, it takes effort and practice. If you keep trying you'll suddenly get the knack and roll your Rs with the best of them! The same applies to learning the correct pronunciation of R in French (in the back of the throat, like gargling). For the Spanish R, you have to put the tip of your tongue against the ridge above your front teeth and let it vibrate. For the double R, you just exaggerate it a bit. Now that I can do it, I really love it, making that RRRRR noise Mexican musicians are so fond of ...
It's the same as learning to swim, ride a bike, touch type, change gear, and so on. You think you'll never get it, but if you doggedly go on trying, one day you'll suddenly find you can do it.
Many English people can't pronounce even the pathetic English R - e.g. Jonathan Ross ("Woss") and the late Roy ("Woy") Jenkins.
Stwange, isn't it?
Keep rolling!
Jenny


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Kathryn Litherland  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:55
Member (2007)
Spanish to English
+ ...
regional variation Apr 22, 2008

You could study with a Bolivian Spanish teacher and dispense with this silly flapping about of the tongue altogether!

The single, "flap" r in Bolivia is essentially the same as anywhere else, but the double, "rolled" rr is more like halfway between "sh" and "z" (a voiced frictative), and oddly similar to the way Argentines pronounce the ll in words like calle.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

"r" in Spanish

Advanced search






Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »
CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search