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PM salary in Argentina (inhouse position)
Thread poster: Fernando Tognis

Fernando Tognis  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 07:49
Member (2006)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Jul 27, 2009

Hi, all!
This morning I received an email from a translation agency based in Argentina.
Apparently, they are interested in my profile and offer me a position as a PM (despite the fact that I do not have experience in that position) and wanted me to schedule an interview this week. I replied to their email and asked them to provide further info about the position, such as salary and weekly hours. In the following email, they commented that the expected salary is about USD1000, working 9 hours a day from Monday to Friday.
I got a little bit disappointed since I think the amount they offered is not high enough. At least, as a freelancer, my salary is higher than the one they offer and I work fewer hours. However, I am aware of the benefits of working as an in-house translator (monthly salary, no due payments, health insurance, social security, etc).
So I'd like to get some advice about this job offer. Is USD 1000 a fair salary as an in-house Project Manager? Could you provide any information about the average salary of PMs in Latin America?
Thanks in advance


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Niraja Nanjundan  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:19
German to English
Spanish forum Jul 28, 2009

Hi Fernando,

If you haven't done so already, you should probably post this in the Spanish forum. You might get more response from South American colleagues there.

All the best,
Niraja


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Gabriela Mejías  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 07:49
English to Spanish
+ ...
Link to Spanish forum? Jul 29, 2009

Niraja Nanjundan wrote:
you should probably post this in the Spanish forum.
Niraja


Hello Fernando,

If you did post it in the Spanish forum, please let us know its link, since I can't find it. I am interested in the replies.

Thank you!

Gabriela


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Marcela Mestre  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 07:49
English to Spanish
My reply in Spanish Jul 29, 2009

Hi Fernando,

Sorry for posting in Spanish. This was published in Clarín - Economics - page 20, on Sunday 26th of July. It might give you an idea.

Average monthly salary for heads and managers, according to department. In-house PMs are, as its name indicates, managers:


Jefe de ventas: 11.151 ARS (es el más alto)
Jefe de RR.HH: 9.448 ARS
Jefe de asuntos legales: 8060 ARS (es el más bajo)

Gerente comercial: 25.739 ARS (es el más alto)
Gerente de RR.HH.: 19.164 ARS
Gerente de logística: 18.004 ARS (es el más bajo)

El estudio fue realizado por la consultora especializada HuCap, exclusivo para IEco, y relevó 86 empresas, entre grandes, medianas y pequeñas, durante el mes de mayo.

Hope it helps.
Best.
mm

[Edited at 2009-07-29 11:40 GMT]


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Mauricio Manzo  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:49
English to Spanish
It is OK Jul 29, 2009

Most translation agencies in Argentina do not pay more than 2,500 ARS for a PM position. Remuneration is quite good considering other companies.

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Gabriela Mejías  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 07:49
English to Spanish
+ ...
Disagree with the OK Jul 29, 2009

Mauricio Manzo wrote:

Most translation agencies in Argentina do not pay more than 2,500 ARS for a PM position. Remuneration is quite good considering other companies.


Hi Mauricio,

It's true that most agencies here do not pay more than that... but do you indeed consider it is ok? PMs should have a higher salary than freelance translators have. They are required expertise. If PMs get 2,500 ARS, how much do you think freelancers should get?

[Edited at 2009-07-29 19:27 GMT]


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Lorena Vicente  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 07:49
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
What freelancers get... Jul 29, 2009

Gabriela Mejías wrote:

If PMs get 2,500 ARS, how much do you think freelancers should get?


Unfortunately, Gabriela, in-house translators working in Argentine agencies are currently being paid sweatshop rates (ARS 1200-1600), instead of earning +ARS 4500 per month.

Lorena

Lorena Vicente | Technical, Scientific, and Literary Translator - EN ES
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



[Edited at 2009-07-29 16:38 GMT]


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Fernando Tognis  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 07:49
Member (2006)
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks... and more comments are welcome Jul 29, 2009

I'd like to thank you all for your help.
Despite knowing that the company sending me the offer is a small one, I consider the salary is low. I 've seen their list of clients and they mention very important companies (providing a big and constant volume of words to translate). So if they are expanding, they should also increase the salaries of their staff.

P.S. I did not post in the Spanish forum


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Lorena Vicente  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 07:49
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Wise Decision Jul 29, 2009

Fernando Tognis wrote:

Despite knowing that the company sending me the offer is a small one, I consider the salary is low. I 've seen their list of clients and they mention very important companies (providing a big and constant volume of words to translate). So if they are expanding, they should also increase the salaries of their staff.


Wise decision, Fernando. Translators/staff working for these agencies should know that they are dumping the market by accepting low rates and salaries which will, eventually, affect the entire community.

Thanks for bringing this up.

Lorena

[Edited at 2009-07-29 19:49 GMT]


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Andres & Leticia Enjuto  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 07:49
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Rather insulting... Jul 29, 2009

Mauricio Manzo wrote:

Most translation agencies in Argentina do not pay more than 2,500 ARS for a PM position. Remuneration is quite good considering other companies.


Mauricio, I find this salary (and your post) rather insulting. It implies. as Gabriela mentioned, that translators earn much less than that (probably half of that amount). Keep in mind the current minimum salary in Argentina for a non-educated, unskilled factory worker is aprox. $1300-1400 Argentine pesos.

I hope I'm wrong, but I believe your comment indicates you're fine with that. Please help us here, and do not promote such lousy salaries.


Let's pretend, only as an example, that an in-house translator (who's probably reading this right now) earns in Argentina $2000/3.8 = 527 USD aprox. If this translator would get a couple of customers providing him/her around 6600 words per month @, say, $0.08 USD, he/she would match his/her current salary.

It means 2-3 days per month of independant, well-paid job, opposed to 22-24. The rest is for having fun and looking for new customers. And for napping, of course.

Oh, I'm sorry! Add one more day of independant work to provide for retirement and social security payments.

And, lte's keep in mind such an in-house job is not "secure". One get's used to an unfair situation, and forgets the freedom of an unlimited career.

Andrés


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Daiana Siri
Argentina
Local time: 07:49
English to Spanish
My experience... Jul 30, 2009

Hi Fernando!

I used to work as a PM in a translation agency in Capital until last year. My salary was similar to the one they are offering you.
When I first got the job I thought it might be useful but after a few months I realized that the freelance translators I contacted earned twice I did working half of the hours and doing actually what I love (which is translating!) as a PM I was all day long chasing deadlines, arguing about quality issues, unsatisfied customers, lost assignments, etc, ANYTHING except translating!
I was stressed out, coordinating projects in too many pair of languages and chasing deadlines all day long until I said enough!
Once I left the agency I realized that I have earned almost nothing, I knew a lot of clients and agencies, but they were the customers of this agency, so I though it was unethical for me to contact them offering my translation services.
In my first week as a freelance translator I earned the same amount of money I used to make as a PM in a whole month, but working from home, with my dog at one side and a cup of coffee at the other, doing what I love.
Anyway, my advice is that in the case you decide this is a good opportunity in order to acquire some new experiences, or points of view, etc, ask for a higher salary! (much higher)

Regards,
Daiana


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Susan van den Ende  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:49
English to Dutch
+ ...
Different jobs Jul 30, 2009

Please keep in mind that PM work and translation work are different.

Many of the translators with whom I work would NEVER consider doing project management, whereas I myself, on the other hand, wouldn't dream of working as a translator (neither in-house, nor freelance).

Whatever you do, don't compare translators' salaries / earnings with those of a PM. The two professions aren't interchangeable. Only very few people are equally at ease in both.

So, please first ask yourself whether you'd even want to work as a PM. If the answer's yes, then perhaps base your thoughts on the salary on two things:

- is it fair, in comparison with other PM salaries in my country?

- how does it compare to what I earn at the moment / would I be happy with the amount?

Good luck on deciding!


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Mauricio Manzo  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:49
English to Spanish
Let`s have a look at some points to make it clear what I meant: Jul 30, 2009

1) A PM needs organizational and communication skills, but does not necessarily need to be a linguist. He may also be a desktop publisher, as many localization projects not only require translation but also DTP. Between communication with vendors and clients, looking for the right resources, analyzing project specifics, budgeting, scheduling and invoicing, I don’t think you would have enough time left to apply your linguistic skills as a translator. And take into account that I am referring to people who do not have previous experience as Project Managers.
2) A recently graduated translator may earn less than a PM, but this is not true for 1 or 2-year experienced translators who render quality translations: they would have the potential to become a Senior Linguist, Language Specialist, Language Lead, Language Coordinator, or whatever position is available. On the other hand, a PM can also have the potential to become a Project Coordinator, etc. I do not understand why some people tend to believe that a PM should earn more or less than a translator or an experienced linguist. These are two completely different tasks. And remuneration is based on skills and experience.
3) Let’s say you charge an amount of X per word and have a daily output of 2,000 words per day. You can make an amount of X at the end of the month, but as a freelancer you also have to pay for many things you get provided when translating in-house. People surely know this, but many times it is not taken into account.
4) I myself worked as a freelancer and in-house, both options are perfectly fine with me, both have advantages and disadvantages, as nearly everything in life.
5) The remuneration I mentioned on my previous comment seems fine to me for someone who does not have previous experience in being a Project Manager.
6) Fixed salary remuneration should be compared to the average remuneration in the respective country (as that is where a person is hired, gets paid, pays his or her rent etc.). You wouldn’t go to a doctor in Argentina and tell him he’s earning money at “sweatshop” rates, because his colleagues in the U.S. earn more.


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Valeria Verona  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 07:49
Member (2003)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Agree with Mauricio Jul 30, 2009

Fer

I agree with Mauricio. The analysis below is quite accurate. Take into account that you get things provided for, paid vacations and leaves, fixed schedule (no working at night and weekends), security (you don't take business risk and you get paid no matter what every month), other costs that you are now bearing (monotributo/autónomos, medical insurance, collections management, bank transfers/checks, delinquent payers).

Only taking into account the amount is an incomplete analysis in my view.

HTH.
Rgds,
Vale



Mauricio Manzo wrote:

1) A PM needs organizational and communication skills, but does not necessarily need to be a linguist. He may also be a desktop publisher, as many localization projects not only require translation but also DTP. Between communication with vendors and clients, looking for the right resources, analyzing project specifics, budgeting, scheduling and invoicing, I don’t think you would have enough time left to apply your linguistic skills as a translator. And take into account that I am referring to people who do not have previous experience as Project Managers.
2) A recently graduated translator may earn less than a PM, but this is not true for 1 or 2-year experienced translators who render quality translations: they would have the potential to become a Senior Linguist, Language Specialist, Language Lead, Language Coordinator, or whatever position is available. On the other hand, a PM can also have the potential to become a Project Coordinator, etc. I do not understand why some people tend to believe that a PM should earn more or less than a translator or an experienced linguist. These are two completely different tasks. And remuneration is based on skills and experience.
3) Let’s say you charge an amount of X per word and have a daily output of 2,000 words per day. You can make an amount of X at the end of the month, but as a freelancer you also have to pay for many things you get provided when translating in-house. People surely know this, but many times it is not taken into account.
4) I myself worked as a freelancer and in-house, both options are perfectly fine with me, both have advantages and disadvantages, as nearly everything in life.
5) The remuneration I mentioned on my previous comment seems fine to me for someone who does not have previous experience in being a Project Manager.
6) Fixed salary remuneration should be compared to the average remuneration in the respective country (as that is where a person is hired, gets paid, pays his or her rent etc.). You wouldn’t go to a doctor in Argentina and tell him he’s earning money at “sweatshop” rates, because his colleagues in the U.S. earn more.


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Aniello Scognamiglio  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 12:49
English to German
+ ...
Disagree Jul 30, 2009

Gabriela Mejías wrote:

PMs should have a higher salary than freelance translators have.


Dear Gabriela,

you are comparing apples with pears.
A PM is an employee (salary!).
A freelancer runs a business!
The sky is the limit

Best, Aniello


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