Certified translation of tax statement
Thread poster: Laura Kingdon

Laura Kingdon  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 10:31
Member (2015)
French to English
+ ...
Aug 30, 2016

I've been translating for a while (working outside of Canada), but just passed the last certification exam here and got the results about a month ago. This means I'm very new to the process of doing certified translations. I have a potential client who has requested a translation of tax statements that will be acceptable to the CRA. I understand that the usual process is to attach a sort of statement to the translation with my signature and seal on it, and I can find examples of such a letter online to work that part out, but the issue is that I don't yet have a stamp (I've requested one, but am still waiting to receive it). Would I be able to do this translation anyway or should I recommend my potential client find someone else? It seems from this:

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/tpcs/ncm-tx/rtrn/cmpltng/ddctns/lns409-485/405-eng.html

that I could also do the translation and then the client could have it notarized; in that case, what would be required of me? Still the same letter?

I'm not having much luck finding useful search results for this through Google, so I'm hoping someone here can explain the requirements a little more clearly.

Thanks!


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Tina Vonhof  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 08:31
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Notarization Aug 31, 2016

Hi Laura,

Your provincial organization may have a sample declaration that you can customize with your contact information etc. Since you don't have a stamp yet, you can sign your declaration before a commissioner for oaths or notary public who will than put his/her stamp on it.

Your stamp, once you have it, goes on the declaration along with your signature and on each page of the translation with your initials.

Feel free to send me an email if you would like to see a copy of my declaration.


[Edited at 2016-08-31 14:50 GMT]


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xxxPaula Rennie  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 10:31
French to English
Statutory declaration Aug 31, 2016

I'm in Canada, and certified. Message me privately and I'll provide you a copy of the stat. dec. I use.

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Ewa Olszowa  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 10:31
Polish to English
+ ...
Affidavit Nov 6, 2016

You have probably got your stamp already but what they mean is that you attached an affidavit you signed in the presence of the notary/commissioner that the translation is true and accurate.

Laura Kingdon wrote:

I've been translating for a while (working outside of Canada), but just passed the last certification exam here and got the results about a month ago. This means I'm very new to the process of doing certified translations. I have a potential client who has requested a translation of tax statements that will be acceptable to the CRA. I understand that the usual process is to attach a sort of statement to the translation with my signature and seal on it, and I can find examples of such a letter online to work that part out, but the issue is that I don't yet have a stamp (I've requested one, but am still waiting to receive it). Would I be able to do this translation anyway or should I recommend my potential client find someone else? It seems from this:

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/tpcs/ncm-tx/rtrn/cmpltng/ddctns/lns409-485/405-eng.html

that I could also do the translation and then the client could have it notarized; in that case, what would be required of me? Still the same letter?

I'm not having much luck finding useful search results for this through Google, so I'm hoping someone here can explain the requirements a little more clearly.

Thanks!


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Maxi Schwarz
Local time: 09:31
German to English
+ ...
The affidavit part is incorrect Nov 6, 2016

Ewa Olszowa wrote:

You have probably got your stamp already but what they mean is that you attached an affidavit you signed in the presence of the notary/commissioner that the translation is true and accurate.

The quoted excerpt from the government site says:
The translation has to be certified by an official who has the authority to administer an oath or solemn declaration (commissioner of oaths, notary public, or lawyer) unless it has been completed by a translator who is a certified member of one of the provincial or territorial organizations of translators and interpreters of Canada.
I have been working as a certified translator in Canada for close to 30 years. Our certification has a certain legal status here, and the notary public part is not usually needed within Canada.

Your provincial organization is also available to advise you over the phone or by e-mail, and I have found them helpful in the past. Remember that our certification also means that we only translate material in which we have sufficient expertise (part of the code of ethics we study and included in the exam).

I add my seal to the translation as well as a copy of the original. On the translation the seal is also dated and signed (each page). I have a certification letter which contains a statement that I am a certified translator with the ATIO, certification number NNNN, and that I certify that this is a true and accurate translation. That ATIO also gives (or gave) templates for the ATIO logo, which we are legally allowed to add to our letterhead as long as we remain certified members in good standing.


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Ewa Olszowa  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 10:31
Polish to English
+ ...
Affidavits are widely used in Canada Nov 8, 2016

The commissioner of oaths, notary public or lawyer do not certify translations or content (often they will not understand the language anyway), but signature of the person who perfomed the translation . That is an affidavit - the person who did the translation swears before the notary, etc that this is a true translation (unless the lawyer does the translation himself which is very rare). Some government offices even have own templates of affidavits to be singed.
The quoted excerpt look like a summary/shortcut of the above (or may refer to translations gotten from other countries).


Maxi Schwarz wrote:

Ewa Olszowa wrote:

You have probably got your stamp already but what they mean is that you attached an affidavit you signed in the presence of the notary/commissioner that the translation is true and accurate.

The quoted excerpt from the government site says:
The translation has to be certified by an official who has the authority to administer an oath or solemn declaration (commissioner of oaths, notary public, or lawyer) unless it has been completed by a translator who is a certified member of one of the provincial or territorial organizations of translators and interpreters of Canada.
I have been working as a certified translator in Canada for close to 30 years. Our certification has a certain legal status here, and the notary public part is not usually needed within Canada.

Your provincial organization is also available to advise you over the phone or by e-mail, and I have found them helpful in the past. Remember that our certification also means that we only translate material in which we have sufficient expertise (part of the code of ethics we study and included in the exam).

I add my seal to the translation as well as a copy of the original. On the translation the seal is also dated and signed (each page). I have a certification letter which contains a statement that I am a certified translator with the ATIO, certification number NNNN, and that I certify that this is a true and accurate translation. That ATIO also gives (or gave) templates for the ATIO logo, which we are legally allowed to add to our letterhead as long as we remain certified members in good standing.


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Maxi Schwarz
Local time: 09:31
German to English
+ ...
Re: affidavits Nov 9, 2016

Ewa Olszowa wrote:

The commissioner of oaths, notary public or lawyer do not certify translations or content (often they will not understand the language anyway), but signature of the person who performed the translation . That is an affidavit - the person who did the translation swears before the notary, etc that this is a true translation (unless the lawyer does the translation himself which is very rare). Some government offices even have own templates of affidavits to be singed.
The quoted excerpt look like a summary/shortcut of the above (or may refer to translations gotten from other countries)..

The quoted excerpt comes from the link that you provided. I highlighted the part that is important.
I know that the notary public etc. do not certify translations, and that it is the signature of the translator that gets certified. I have done this process numerous times over the past 25 years. It is done, for example, when a translation is destined for another country such as the United States. But a Canadian certified translator does not have to go through this step when the translation is destined for a Canadian body. Our stamp is in lieu of that. I described the contents of a certifying letter one can add to this.


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Ewa Olszowa  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 10:31
Polish to English
+ ...
No stamp Nov 10, 2016

That is correct but the initial question was what to do if the person does not have a stamp yet. Then, the affidavit would make it.


Maxi Schwarz wrote:

Ewa Olszowa wrote:

The commissioner of oaths, notary public or lawyer do not certify translations or content (often they will not understand the language anyway), but signature of the person who performed the translation . That is an affidavit - the person who did the translation swears before the notary, etc that this is a true translation (unless the lawyer does the translation himself which is very rare). Some government offices even have own templates of affidavits to be singed.
The quoted excerpt look like a summary/shortcut of the above (or may refer to translations gotten from other countries)..

The quoted excerpt comes from the link that you provided. I highlighted the part that is important.
I know that the notary public etc. do not certify translations, and that it is the signature of the translator that gets certified. I have done this process numerous times over the past 25 years. It is done, for example, when a translation is destined for another country such as the United States. But a Canadian certified translator does not have to go through this step when the translation is destined for a Canadian body. Our stamp is in lieu of that. I described the contents of a certifying letter one can add to this.


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