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In UK, does one have to put anything on the translated document to show that it is certified?
Thread poster: Ewa Erdmann

Ewa Erdmann  Identity Verified

English to Polish
+ ...
Feb 21, 2010

Hey everyone,

I'm a translator 'to-be-qualified', I'm waiting for my DipTrans results. I've just realised that I have no idea whether, if I get qualified, I would have to to put anything on the translated document to prove that it is a certified translation. In Poland sworn translators use stamps. Can anyone tell me how it is in the UK?
Thanks.

Ewa


 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:10
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
No "sworn translators" in UK Feb 22, 2010

Members of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting are considered as qualified to certify most things, and agencies and clients will usually accept a certificate from them.
Sometimes translations have to be "notarized", but this simply means you have to swear in the presence of a notary public (usually a solicitor) that you are who you say you are, and you show him/her your various qualifications.


 

Ewa Erdmann  Identity Verified

English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
No need to certify the document? Feb 22, 2010

Thank you for your answer Jack. I assume then that apart from the certificate which I can wave in front of the clients' eyes, I don't need to put any mark/sign/stamp to prove that the translation is certified (eg. if it a legal document) and I just submit it as it is. Correct me if I got it wrong.

 

Natalia Mackevich  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:10
English to Russian
+ ...
Statement Feb 23, 2010

In some cases, a translator's statement is required, but it's very rare. It means that you print out the original, your translation and your statement (that you know both languages and have translated the text to the best of your knowledge) and send it by post. But in my practice it only happened twice (99% of my work is sent by e-mail, while 1% is notarized and sent by post).

 

Ewa Erdmann  Identity Verified

English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Feb 24, 2010

Great. The UK prefers the easy way, no hassle with the stamps or anything thenicon_smile.gif
Thanks for the answer.


 

Alex Eames
Local time: 06:10
English to Polish
+ ...
Nothing required for UK use, but may be for use in PL Mar 8, 2010

As others have said, it's very rare to need anything sworn in the UK. Occasionally you can visit a solicitor and pay a swear fee and they will stamp a document for you.

Most often no certification of any kind is required.

For documents exported to Poland though this is sometimes not sufficient. You know how it is over there, sometimes only notarised will do. It's as well to check with clients what your output is going to be used for. In some cases it will be better (for them, but not for you) to have it translated locally in Poland by a sworn translator. It just depends on the circumstances.

It's not really your problem if something is rejected through ignorance in this way, but it's as well to be aware of the possibility. It shouldn't affect much at your end.

Hope this helps

Alex Eames
http://www.translatortips.com/
helping translators do better business


 

Ewa Erdmann  Identity Verified

English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Very helpful Mar 8, 2010

Thank you, that was helpful indeedicon_smile.gif I should have specified that my main concern was translation of documents exported to Poland and to be used in court but you fully explained how it works there. Thanks again!

 

Mirelluk  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:10
Member (2005)
English to Italian
+ ...
We provide certified traanslations Mar 19, 2010

I came across this topic only now and would like to add our experience.

As a translation company, Full Member of ATC, we are qualified to provide certified translations.
We carry out the translations and deliver them on our headed paper, in a similar lay-out to the source document, we also add a statement, and apply our special ATC stamp for certified translations. Last but not least, according to our Quality Assurance procedures we file each assignment under a unique log number and store a copy of the whole documentation in a separate archive.

Our clients are asked to provide certified translations of a variety of documents, from births certificates to school diplomas, criminal records, marriage certificates and many more, usually requested by the prospect employer, either a private company or state organisation or an official body, when our clients apply for a job in the UK, or prepare their documents before getting married, and so on.

Our certified translations undergo a special checking/proofreading process which guarantees an independent assessment of the final output and offer to the prospect employer, or the final recipient, a further guarantee that the translation is true and faithful. They represent an intermediate product between an ordinary translation and a sworn translation, of the type quite often requested in other European countries.

For confidentiality reasons only our client can request a copy of the certified translation (this is actually true for all assignments we carry out) and can rest assured that we have kept a copy of the whole paperwork/files.

In conclusion, it is up to the prospect employer, or any final interested party, to request an independent certified translation or to accept an ordinary translation, sometimes even carried out by the applicant himself.

Best wishes,
Mirella


 

Ewa Erdmann  Identity Verified

English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Professional approach Mar 19, 2010

Mirella

I think your policy should be adopted by every translator; certified translation with a statement and a stamp would certainly give a particular document more formality and make the work of the translator much more respected and appreciated.What's more, the client would be sure he got the value for his money, even though the quality of the translation would be the same without the stamp. The form should equal the content.

Mirella, I really appreciate your sharing the experience of your company. Impressed by your professional approach I wanted to apply as a freelancer but you have set high standards (10 years of experience). I do understand that and I will come back to you in the next few years, after I have passed the junior stage and become a senior translatoricon_smile.gif

All the best,

Ewa


 
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Monika Elisabeth Sieger  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:10
Member (2009)
English to German
+ ...
Certified translations Mar 20, 2010

We provide this service too.
As we translate documetns for official use as well we offer the translation either by certification or as a choice for the client, by a special notification by a notary public.
He even offers to provide us with speeded Hague Apostilles and knows that we have a thorough proofreading and specialist translation service.
We aim to provide documents with all information, even a description of possible seals and the translation even of the tiniest bit on the document. The look and feel of this translation is up to your choice as I agree mith Asensio Mayoral that we translators do not have to produce a new 'original' document, but it should content all information.
It is widely discussed whether this is always necessary. But out of my own experience as a former legal employee in the German and English Legal system I know very well, that most administrative officers (in any sense) or judges are always getting very angry and are going ballistic if they have the impression that not all information content in the document is translated. Even if it is "only" the address of the printer of the original office paper!
Even my longstanding notary public asks me all the time which bit is translated in which way as he wants to be on the safe side as well.

So the easiest way is to go and see a notary public. The seals are really very impressive and judges, not only in Germany or Austria, love such impressive and official looking seals, signatures or attachments.


 
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juvera  Identity Verified
Local time: 06:10
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Make up your mind May 9, 2010

Ewa Erdmann wrote:
Great. The UK prefers the easy way, no hassle with the stamps or anything then.

or:

Mirella, I think your policy should be adopted by every translator; certified translation with a statement and a stamp would certainly give a particular document more formality and make the work of the translator much more respected and appreciated.What's more, the client would be sure he got the value for his money, even though the quality of the translation would be the same without the stamp. The form should equal the content.


So the UK system is great, but you believe that a "policy" could be adopted by every translator and by rubber stamping a document the work of the translator would be more respected and appreciated. Moreover the client would be sure he got value for money (after all, the imprint of a rubber stamp is on it!) although the quality of the translation would be the same. Hmmm...

Well, I am not going to rush out and buy a rubber stamp. I don't believe that irrelevant smudgy ink marks make the slightest bit of difference.icon_wink.gif

Now talking seriously:
in the UK very few documents need to be certified, even for court use, but when certified translation is required, it should be properly certified, as described above, for example by sivara. On the other hand, you are always responsible for your translation, rubber stamp or not.

Regarding documents to be taken to Poland, the client should find out if English or Polish certification is needed or not, because it is the client who knows what he or she wants the translation for.


[Edited at 2010-05-09 13:45 GMT]


 

Ewa Erdmann  Identity Verified

English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Second thoughts May 9, 2010

First of all, thank you for spotting that. Indeed, I did change my mind; initially I reacted spontaneously and thought that it's a good thing that there's no need to prove that the translation is certified.
I do not aim to support the introduction of any changes or force anyone to buy a rubber stamp, especially that it does not make any difference to the translators themselves.
Having said that, clients do pay attention to that and they feel they receive a valuable 'product' which would be of stronger authority than the one without the potential stamp. I know it sounds a bit artificial but in the light of the discussions among translators about the profession being unappreciated, I thought that this could possibly bring some more respect and appreciation for the job that we do.
This is my opinion, no one has to agree with that. In fact, any further comments are welcome.


 

Martin Stranak  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 07:10
English to Czech
+ ...
"Certified" translations in the UK May 10, 2010

I am a sworn translator for ENG and my native language, member of various professional chambers back home and even listed among forensic experts on English language for specified fields of translation by our Ministry of Justice.


I can say the English authorities like round seals and affidavits and stamps. My customers in the UK have not had any problems with this type of "notarisation" or certification, whatever you may want to call that, so faricon_smile.gif


 
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In UK, does one have to put anything on the translated document to show that it is certified?

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