Spain's senate could start using five languages

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Tatty  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:37
Spanish to English
+ ...
Apr 29, 2010

What a waste of public resources.

Usually, in countries where there is more than one official language children learn the other one/s at school. May be the bilingual campaign (English/Spanish) should be knocked on the head and instead school children should learn a regional language.

The reason why simultaneous interpretation is offered in multilingual environments is so that no one is playing with a disadvantage. Could it really be said that, say, a Catalan or Galician politician in speaking in Castillian is in some way prevented from effectively arguing their points or upholding their beliefs. Only if this is the case should the option of offering simultaneous interpretation be considered. But I suspect that it is a thinly veiled attempt to extend protectionism.


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John Marais  Identity Verified
Spanish to English
+ ...
Apr 29, 2010

Franco must be turning in his grave.

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Michael Wetzel  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:37
German to English
Apr 29, 2010

Castilian = "Spanish"? Will I get in trouble if I use this equation with non-Castilian Spanish customers (and vice-versa: will I get in trouble for using the word "Castilian" instead of "Spanish" with other customers)?
Are these all genuinely fairly distinct languages or just strong dialects that are mutually understandable?
I don't have anything to do with the Spanish language, but I would guess that the issue will come up at some point along the line. I had the same thing with "Flemish" vs. "Dutch" recently. In English, most dictionaries and style guides now reccomend simply using the word "Dutch", but you better not use it if you're working for a Flemish customer!


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John Rawlins  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:37
Spanish to English
+ ...
Apr 29, 2010

Wonderful news for Spanish interpreters - not so good news for Spanish taxpayers (including me).

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Oriol Vives  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:37
Member (2009)
English to Catalan
+ ...
Let's see if it will happen May 1, 2010

Anyways of the political reasons, the fact is that the more work, the better for us spanish interpreters.

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Mar Brotons  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:37
English to Spanish
+ ...
5 languages May 7, 2010

I'd love to get payed for interpreting in the Valencian-Catalan combination... Easy money!

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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:37
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
FYI! May 8, 2010

John Marais wrote:
Franco must be turning in his grave.

Just in case you did not know: Franco died 35 years ago. Bringing him into the discussion is as absurd as remembering his deeds as part of current Spanish politics.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:37
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
It is in line with their beliefs May 8, 2010

Tatty wrote:
The reason why simultaneous interpretation is offered in multilingual environments is so that no one is playing with a disadvantage. Could it really be said that, say, a Catalan or Galician politician in speaking in Castillian is in some way prevented from effectively arguing their points or upholding their beliefs.

I think then that your assessment is incorrect. The use of interpreters in this case is completely in line with these politicians' beliefs! They just don't believe in a common language, the same way the hardly believe (if at all) in a unified country.

It is sad such an amount of people feel more strongly about their "language rights" than about being deprived of their hard-worked money.


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Darío  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:37
English to Spanish
+ ...
I don't see the trouble here May 8, 2010

What about the European Parliament? Or the UN General Assembly?
Don't we all pay for those institutions? Should those officials limit themselves to one language in their meetings? Which one? English?

In a smaller scale, the situation jn Spain is the same.

Lots of people have Catalan (±7 millions), Galician (±3 millions) or Basque (±800.000) as their mother tongues —and, for the disinformed, none of those are dialects—. Yes, indeed, they can all speak Spanish too. But we have all agreed in this democratic country to respect and encourage the use of our cooficial languages. And that is what our institutions are simply doing.



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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:37
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
No, that is not what they asked May 9, 2010

Darío wrote:
Lots of people have Catalan (±7 millions), Galician (±3 millions) or Basque (±800.000) as their mother tongues —and, for the disinformed, none of those are dialects—. Yes, indeed, they can all speak Spanish too. But we have all agreed in this democratic country to respect and encourage the use of our cooficial languages. And that is what our institutions are simply doing.

I really doubt that people would have said Yes to the Constitution in 1978 if they had known that the new system implied this kind of things (total waste of our money, 2 million more public workers, thousands of Audi 8's and drivers for even for the lowest authorities, etc. etc.). No, we did not accept this: everybody thought that what they were asked in 1978 was whether they wanted to live in peace with each other and democracy, forgetting about a dark past and moving on; of course a vast majority voted yes.


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Krzysztof Kajetanowicz  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 22:37
English to Polish
+ ...
hahaha May 9, 2010

You know, Greece has just - only just - spent EUR 2.5 billion on French warships.

It seems that the most fiscally troubled countries are also the most creative in finding ways to get into a bigger mess.


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Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:37
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
What can Eur 230 buy you anyway? May 9, 2010

Krzysztof Kajetanowicz wrote:
You know, Greece has just - only just - spent EUR 2.5 billion on French warships.

But the average Greek is surely happy to fork out Eur 230 (per person, i.e. for an average household with 4 people will mean Eur 920) for nice warships?

In Spain, we already owe some Eur 15,000 per person just in the debt of the central government, and despite that, our lovely politicians are not sensible enough to cut expenses. I wonder whether we will at some stage get to know how much our regional and local governments owe, as newspapers are very careful not to enter into this matter (after all a big part of the income also comes from the different governments).

This is not a monetary problem what we have in Spain: it is a problem of mental sanity. Maybe the expense in interpreters will not be that high compared to other things (like the luxury cars, luxury offices, luxury furniture in their office while many others purchase their chairs in IKEA, business class travel expenses --if not a private airplane paid by the public--, etc.), but it is the whole spirit of the thing. They simply don't care that 20% of the population in working age is unemployed and swamped in government debt.

[Edited at 2010-05-09 11:50 GMT]


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Dr. Andrew Frankland  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:37
Member (2007)
English
+ ...
Don't see the trouble here? I do Jun 30, 2010

Darío wrote:

What about the European Parliament? Or the UN General Assembly?

In a smaller scale, the situation jn Spain is the same.



No it's not the same as neither the EU nor the UN have a common language, whereas Spain does. This country is already overrun with civil servants without having to create a load more just to be nice to the minority political parties whose parliamentary votes are keeping this government (and most previous ones to be fair) in power.

Andy

[Edited at 2010-06-30 14:35 GMT]


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Darío  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:37
English to Spanish
+ ...
You want to see a trouble, you'll see it... Jun 30, 2010

Dr. Andrew Frankland wrote:

No it's not the same as neither the EU nor the UN have a common language, whereas Spain does. This country is already overrun with civil servants without having to create a load more just to be nice to the minority political parties whose parliamentary votes are keeping this government (and most previous ones to be fair) in power.

Andy

[Edited at 2010-06-30 14:35 GMT]


"Minority" political parties?
Those minority parties do represent —they should, at least— a population of 7 million Catalan speaking people... (much more people than many fully independent countries). These 7 million people have their own language and their own rights. There's not much else to say about this "trouble".

I find it a better investment than purchasing AK-47s, Black Hawk choppers or nuclear submarines, or better than funding anachronistic institutions like the RC Church or helping the banks to suck us again and again, for instance...


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Juan González Pérez
Spain
Local time: 22:37
Member (2008)
English to Spanish
+ ...
You want to see a trouble, you'll see it... Aug 13, 2010

Darío wrote:

"Minority" political parties?
Those minority parties do represent —they should, at least— a population of 7 million Catalan speaking people... (much more people than many fully independent countries). These 7 million people have their own language and their own rights. There's not much else to say about this "trouble".



Its Section 3 (literally), paragraph 1 reads as follows:

El castellano es la lengua española oficial del Estado. Todos los españoles tienen el deber de conocerla y el derecho a usarla. (Each and every Spanish person with Spanish nationality MUST know this language and HAS THE RIGHT to use it)

And on paragraph 2 of the same article:

2. Las demás lenguas españolas serán también oficiales en las respectivas Comunidades Autónomas de acuerdo con sus Estatutos. (the rest of Spanish languages will be official languages ONLY in the corresponding regions).

Therefore, according to this there is NO need for interpreters in the Senate. Anyway, you can see bizarre situations such as the head representative in Catalonia, born in Cordoba (Andalusia) denying to speak Spanish. Totally logical, as I am sure you may realize...

Of course, the Constitution could be modified but that's another story and these are the CURRENT rules of play, so WHY there should be interpreters in this case?

Just my humble opinion...


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