Translation vs. localization (and those other long words)

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Anita Lagerwall  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:08
English to Norwegian
+ ...
Should not G14N be G11N? Apr 18, 2011

Following the logic in the article about the codes, I get 11 letters between ghe G and the N.
Maybe I cannot count? Or is there something I don't understand?


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Gerard de Noord  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 15:08
Member (2003)
German to Dutch
+ ...
Should not G14N be G11N? Apr 18, 2011

Anita Lagerwall wrote:

Following the logic in the article about the codes, I get 11 letters between ghe G and the N.
Maybe I cannot count? Or is there something I don't understand?


LOL, or shoul it be 101?
G4d


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B D Finch  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 15:08
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Never mind the codes, but Apr 18, 2011

As what they describe as localisation is what I understand to be translation, this is a worrying sign that some translation clients have a very poor understanding of what translation is about.

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Michael Wetzel  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 15:08
German to English
Definition of translation Apr 19, 2011

Hello,
What's the term again? I believe it is "useful idiot". Writing texts like this is the best thing anyone can do to help professional translators realize that at least a little bit of theory is necessary and productive.

"1. Translation – This applies to fairly literal, “word for word.” This is often out of necessity. If you want to make sure that a person in Japan understands how to use a product (such as a medical device), it is important that the source and target-language text match up precisely."

Such "interlinear translations" may play a useful role in the translation of religious texts, but every translator (and client) has read enough interlinear translations of instruction manuals to know that the exact opposite is the case for almost every other type of text.

I also seriously doubt that the definitions of "internationalization" and "globalization" are typical: For me, these represent efforts to make texts as convincing as possible for a wide variety of native speakers (UK vs. US or the hundred varieties of Spanish, for example) or for a wide variety of non-native speakers.

I assume that this article is MT hype: that seems like a more convincing explanation of these "errors" than that the author was absolutely clueless.

Sincerely,
Michael


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Translation vs. localization (and those other long words)

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