New Google eBooks translation marks the beginning of "deep cultural change"

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Allison Wright (X)  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 22:10
"Lemon water, chicken water /Water make me retch" May 20, 2011

Syliva Plath, Fever 103.

Compliments of Google translate:

At least two, no three, errors in the German version:
"Lemon Wasser-, Hühner-Wasser / Wasser macht mich würgen"

For laughs, the French:
"Lemon l'eau, l'eau de poulet / Eau de me faire vomir"

For the Portuguese-challenged, Portuguese does have it's own word for lemon, and variations thereon:
"Lemon água, água de frango / Água me faz vomitar"

Am I supposed to feel c
... See more
Syliva Plath, Fever 103.

Compliments of Google translate:

At least two, no three, errors in the German version:
"Lemon Wasser-, Hühner-Wasser / Wasser macht mich würgen"

For laughs, the French:
"Lemon l'eau, l'eau de poulet / Eau de me faire vomir"

For the Portuguese-challenged, Portuguese does have it's own word for lemon, and variations thereon:
"Lemon água, água de frango / Água me faz vomitar"

Am I supposed to feel culturally enriched now? I would rather drink chicken soup!

[Edited at 2011-05-21 10:54 GMT]
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Giuseppina Gatta, MA (Hons)
English to Italian
+ ...
"Lemon water, chicken water /Water make me retch" May 20, 2011

Allison Wright wrote:

Syliva Plath, Fever 103º.

Compliments of Google translate:

At least two, no three, errors in the German version:
"Lemon Wasser-, Hühner-Wasser / Wasser macht mich würgen"

For laughs, the French:
"Lemon l'eau, l'eau de poulet / Eau de me faire vomir"

For the Portuguese-challenged, Portuguese does have it's own word for lemon, and variations thereon:
"Lemon água, água de frango / Água me faz vomitar"

Am I supposed to feel culturally enriched now? I would rather drink chicken soup.!


"Deep cultural change," to use the words of the article, does not mean necessarily something positive.
And this is the usual hype of the mainstream media about Google, any translator (or linguist, how they are called in the U.S.) worth of their title should know better than that.

[Edited at 2011-05-20 15:48 GMT]


 

Laurent KRAULAND (X)  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 23:10
French to German
+ ...
Deep "cultural" change May 20, 2011

Giuseppina Gatta, MA (Hons) wrote:
"Deep cultural change," to use the words of the article, does not mean necessarily something positive.
And this is the usual hype of the mainstream media about Google, any translator (or linguist, how they are called in the U.S.) worth of their title should know better than that.

[Edited at 2011-05-20 15:48 GMT]


I hardly can remember anything created by Google that was NOT the beginning of deep cultural change.


 

FarkasAndras  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:10
English to Hungarian
+ ...
By Google May 20, 2011

Laurent KRAULAND wrote:

Giuseppina Gatta, MA (Hons) wrote:
"Deep cultural change," to use the words of the article, does not mean necessarily something positive.
And this is the usual hype of the mainstream media about Google, any translator (or linguist, how they are called in the U.S.) worth of their title should know better than that.

[Edited at 2011-05-20 15:48 GMT]


I hardly can remember anything created by Google that was NOT the beginning of deep cultural change.


Buzz comes to mind... and Latitude. Oh, and the most overhyped stupid gimmick of all time: [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache_Wave]Wave[url].

Google has an endearing habit of throwing everything they can think of against the wall and seeing what sticks.
That said, Google Translate is definitely a rung above these stillborn projects, among Google's great achievements that have earned it a place in the history of technology, and, arguably, humanity. I'd agree that Google Translate (well, ubiquitus high-quality MT and natural language processing in general) has the potential to bring about profound cultural change. But Google Translate has been around for years. People have always been able to copy-paste bits of literary texts to translate.google.com. Now they can essentially do the same with fewer clicks... I don't see why this is a major piece of news.


 

mediamatrix (X)
Local time: 18:10
Spanish to English
+ ...
" ... another step towards the destruction of language" May 21, 2011

Period.

MediaMatrix


 

Ashutosh Mitra  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 02:40
Member (2011)
English to Hindi
+ ...
To the best of my knowledge... May 21, 2011

I have seen people complaining about the machine translation provided by Google, but there are certain facts which we must understand-
1. Google is like any other machine helping in translation, and it does not work on its own.
2. A machine develops its memory with the help of its users.
3. Any input to it will give an output based on its available resources.
4. The more we use it, the more efficient it will become.
5. It shall be used as a help or support and not a
... See more
I have seen people complaining about the machine translation provided by Google, but there are certain facts which we must understand-
1. Google is like any other machine helping in translation, and it does not work on its own.
2. A machine develops its memory with the help of its users.
3. Any input to it will give an output based on its available resources.
4. The more we use it, the more efficient it will become.
5. It shall be used as a help or support and not an option to replace the human touch.
6. Most important thing is that it is good for our community that these machines give silly translation options, or else if once they will start providing accurate translation who will come to us.
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FarkasAndras  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:10
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Care to elaborate? May 21, 2011

mediamatrix wrote:

destruction of human language


How could machine translation possibly ruin language? It can produce rubbish language, yes. Damage anything? Not really. People have been moaning about "these youngsters" who have no respect for their parents and the things that came before them, and how their language is becoming a perverted abomination that can hardly fulfil its function... since at least the 18th century. Probably ever since human language existed. We seem to be doing fine so far, why do you think machine translated fiction will bring this good streak to an end?


 

Allison Wright (X)  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 22:10
It is a major piece of news May 22, 2011

FarkasAndras wrote:

Laurent KRAULAND wrote:

Giuseppina Gatta, MA (Hons) wrote:
"Deep cultural change," to use the words of the article, does not mean necessarily something positive.
And this is the usual hype of the mainstream media about Google, any translator (or linguist, how they are called in the U.S.) worth of their title should know better than that.

[Edited at 2011-05-20 15:48 GMT]


I hardly can remember anything created by Google that was NOT the beginning of deep cultural change.


Buzz comes to mind... and Latitude. Oh, and the most overhyped stupid gimmick of all time: [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache_Wave]Wave[url].

Google has an endearing habit of throwing everything they can think of against the wall and seeing what sticks.
That said, Google Translate is definitely a rung above these stillborn projects, among Google's great achievements that have earned it a place in the history of technology, and, arguably, humanity. I'd agree that Google Translate (well, ubiquitus high-quality MT and natural language processing in general) has the potential to bring about profound cultural change. But Google Translate has been around for years. People have always been able to copy-paste bits of literary texts to translate.google.com. Now they can essentially do the same with fewer clicks... I don't see why this is a major piece of news.


It is a major piece of news precisely because what Google eBooks/Translate is achieving with this latest move is to get "the global public" to accept poorly constructed, mangled texts as "literature", and as a bona fide linguistic form, to which Google is assigning the gross misnomer of "translation" (conveniently omitting any mention of "machine" whilst doing so).

It is this major mind-shift which has me worried.
I can just see the dictionary definitions, say, 20 years from now:
Translator, n. 1. Process by which digital means are used to render a book, or other text, from one language to another. cf. Google.
2. (obs.) Multilingual human beings who perform this task more slowly than conventional translators, with marginally greater accuracy, for pecuniary gain.

Interestingly, I could not have even dreamed of making such a statement 20-odd years ago, when I became aware of the existence of MT.


 

FarkasAndras  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:10
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Facts May 22, 2011

Allison Wright wrote:

It is a major piece of news


"Two less clicks" is never a major piece of news.

Allison Wright wrote:
what Google eBooks/Translate is achieving with this latest move is to get "the global public" to accept poorly constructed, mangled texts as "literature", and as a bona fide linguistic form


No they aren't achieving that. I don't think they even think they can.


 

Roy Williams  Identity Verified
Austria
Local time: 23:10
German to English
Biting off more it can chew May 23, 2011

In my experience, google translation is good at loosely translating a single sentence; it has even, very rarely, produced a result that I didn't have to edit. However, translating multiple sentences (two or more) usually results in utter nonsense. I therefore find it hard to belive that this new variation will be able translate chunks of text in real time without massive post editing, which would then no longer be real-time translation. Or am I mistaken?

 

Allison Wright (X)  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 22:10
Biting off more it can chew May 23, 2011

Roy Williams wrote:

I therefore find it hard to believe that this new variation will be able translate chunks of text in real time without massive post editing, which would then no longer be real-time translation. Or am I mistaken?


Google eBooks is not interested in post editing because it interested in real time is. Helps to retain the flavour of the source language


 


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