France bans 'Facebook' and 'Twitter' from TV and radio

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Hilary Wilson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:36
English to French
+ ...
Touitteur Jun 7, 2011

Surely, all you have to do is say Touitteur!

 

Signe Golly  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 19:36
Danish to English
+ ...
Wish I could 'Like' this Jun 7, 2011

Hilary Wilson wrote:

Surely, all you have to do is say Touitteur!




 

Ambrose Li  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 13:36
Member (2011)
Chinese to English
+ ...
They did ban “email”? Jun 7, 2011

Isn’t “mél” just as much as an anglicism?…

 

Krzysztof Kajetanowicz (X)  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 19:36
English to Polish
+ ...
heh Jun 7, 2011

1. To me, the big distinction is between state-owned and private broadcasters. They did ban Facebook on Polish state-owned televison stations. It was ridiculed but it wasn't protested. But private ones? I mean come on! There is a difference between setting reasonable conditions with respect to companies that want to use (scarce) TV/radio frequencies and being an outright censor. And an arbitrary censor at that.

2. Since when does the French government actually like competitio
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1. To me, the big distinction is between state-owned and private broadcasters. They did ban Facebook on Polish state-owned televison stations. It was ridiculed but it wasn't protested. But private ones? I mean come on! There is a difference between setting reasonable conditions with respect to companies that want to use (scarce) TV/radio frequencies and being an outright censor. And an arbitrary censor at that.

2. Since when does the French government actually like competition?
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Anne Diamantidis  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 19:36
English to French
+ ...
They did, and created an official French term Jun 7, 2011

Ambrose Li wrote:

Isn’t “mél” just as much as an anglicism?…


"mél" is actually barely used - the official term is "courriel", but since 2003, we mostly use "e-mail" anyway, though "courriel" is also widely used.
I personally found a compromise by always using "courriel" at the first contact with a prospect client, both in writing or verbally. Depending on whether the person then use "e-mail" or "courriel", I'll just adapt to/her.

This whole courriel/mél/e-mail thing has gotten quite blurry in the everyday use.

Cheers!
Anne


 

Andriy Yasharov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 20:36
Member (2008)
English to Russian
+ ...
A reason for the restriction Jun 8, 2011

I still don't understand why were the words Facebook and Twitter banned anyway? If an anchorperson on TV or radio mentions that something has been posted on Facebook, it is considered an ad? I don't intend to judge anybody but this move of the French government seems very unwise to me because it complicates communication.

 

Schtroumpf
Local time: 19:36
German to French
+ ...
Sorry but I wonder whether your story is not exagerated Jun 8, 2011

Hi Romina,

pls take a look at the story as it is related in French:
"« Le Conseil a été saisi par une chaîne de télévision de la conformité à la réglementation en matière de publicité des renvois aux pages consacrées à ses émissions sur des sites de réseaux sociaux ».

Le CSA a estimé par décision du 12 avril, que « le renvoi des téléspectateurs ou des auditeurs à la page de l’émission sur les réseaux sociaux sans les citer présente un caract
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Hi Romina,

pls take a look at the story as it is related in French:
"« Le Conseil a été saisi par une chaîne de télévision de la conformité à la réglementation en matière de publicité des renvois aux pages consacrées à ses émissions sur des sites de réseaux sociaux ».

Le CSA a estimé par décision du 12 avril, que « le renvoi des téléspectateurs ou des auditeurs à la page de l’émission sur les réseaux sociaux sans les citer présente un caractère informatif, alors que le renvoi vers ces pages en nommant les réseaux sociaux concernés revêt un caractère publicitaire qui contrevient à un décret de mars 1992 « prohibant la publicité clandestine »."
http://lemediascope.fr/?p=66614

I understand that you must not directly guide the public on the Facebook/Twitter site OF THE BROADCAST PROGRAM.

Did your media really tell the truth? We still have a sort of democracy in France )
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Krzysztof Kajetanowicz (X)  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 19:36
English to Polish
+ ...
there is a difference of course BUT Jun 8, 2011

Schtroumpf wrote:

I understand that you must not directly guide the public on the Facebook/Twitter site OF THE BROADCAST PROGRAM.

Did your media really tell the truth? We still have a sort of democracy in France )


But it's the equivalent of banning "to find out more, call us on Skype". Ridiculous. It's just because the companies are American, and the French government can't stand it so badly that it resorts to censoring private media.

The whole "fair competition" thing is somehow forgotten when French companies overseas, especially state-owned, only use French vendors (get a company car: Renault/Peugeot only; use a bank: Credit Agricole, Societe Generale or BNP Paribas only, even if they don't have real corporate banking in the country).


 

Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:36
Member (2004)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Mentioning brands names - American TV used to do the same Jun 10, 2011

When I was growing up, the American TV networks always made sure to "dummy up" the labels of all products seen on screen to give them fake names to avoid the perception of promoting one brand over another outside of paid advertising. I think this was an implementation of a now-defunct FCC ban on "integrated advertising."

Similar practices have applied at various times in the U.K. (e.g., blurring t-shirts showing brand names on reality and talk shows to comply with Ofcom regulations).<
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When I was growing up, the American TV networks always made sure to "dummy up" the labels of all products seen on screen to give them fake names to avoid the perception of promoting one brand over another outside of paid advertising. I think this was an implementation of a now-defunct FCC ban on "integrated advertising."

Similar practices have applied at various times in the U.K. (e.g., blurring t-shirts showing brand names on reality and talk shows to comply with Ofcom regulations).

So I think it's silly to single this out as a strangely French concept.

[Edited at 2011-06-10 13:18 GMT]
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France bans 'Facebook' and 'Twitter' from TV and radio

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