Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Oxford English Dictionary adds ‘Kewl’

This discussion belongs to Translation news » "Oxford English Dictionary adds ‘Kewl’ ".
You can see the translation news page and participate in this discussion from there.


Werner Maurer  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 18:33
Spanish to English
+ ...
kewl Sep 30, 2011

Dewd, that's gnarly

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Neil Coffey  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:33
French to English
+ ...
So it only took them 21 years... Sep 30, 2011

By their own admission it's been in use for at least 21 years, so, I don't know if they were expecting a big round of applause or something...

Direct link Reply with quote
 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:33
Spanish to English
+ ...
My two cents Sep 30, 2011

Pathetic. Like dancing dads trying to be down with the kids. We already have "cool", so surely defining this and its ilk would be better left up to online sites like UrbanDictionary.com, allowing the Oxford to dedicate its time, money and efforts to more august matters.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Edward Potter  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:33
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Rad Sep 30, 2011

Eye rilly thinck its gr8 th@t n0bodi noze h0w 2 speel ennymore. [sic]

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:33
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Disagree Sep 30, 2011

I never understood why people would like to be called Antwoine or Dezarai instead of Antoine or Desiree.

Will the OED also include "bloody ell" for "bloody hell"? That (without the 'h') is what came to my mind when I read the news.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Neil Coffey  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:33
French to English
+ ...
Bloody ell Sep 30, 2011

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:
Will the OED also include "bloody ell" for "bloody hell"? That (without the 'h') is what came to my mind when I read the news.


This one's a bit more arguable. If you see "bloody 'ell" as simply an imitation of an accent with essentially no other special attributes governing its usage, then the OED could decide it's not going to include idiosyncratic spelling variants just on practical grounds.

If there's evidence of "bloody ell", as opposed to "bloody hell", being attributed to a particular register, sociolinguistic group etc, then that might be grounds to include it: in that case, you've actually got 'something interesting to document' as it were.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:33
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Reasoning Sep 30, 2011

Neil Coffey wrote:
If there's evidence of "bloody ell", as opposed to "bloody hell", being attributed to a particular register, sociolinguistic group etc, then that might be grounds to include it: in that case, you've actually got 'something interesting to document' as it were.

I sincerely think it would then be worth adding. Being weak and a sinner, I can accept the idea of going to hell, but going to 'ell really gives me the creeps!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
FarkasAndras
Local time: 03:33
English to Hungarian
+ ...
well said Sep 30, 2011

neilmac wrote:

Pathetic. Like dancing dads trying to be down with the kids.


Exactly. I don't know why anyone thought it was a good idea to put rarely used slang spelling variants of a word in the dictionary. If they start doing this, they might as well add 'lawl', 'd00d' and a couple hundred more.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Michael Joseph Wdowiak Beijer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:33
Member (2009)
Dutch to English
+ ...
fnarr fnarr fnarr Oct 1, 2011

I think they are doing a great job. I have a subscription to the ODO (Oxford Dictionaries Online), and have been very impressed so far.

In my opinion, the ultimate English dictionary would contain: every single word they can get their hands on.

We might balk at words such as 'kewl', 'badware', 'facepalm', 'bridezilla', and 'glamping' being added, but wait until you are looking for some stupid marketing term, and you find that the Oxford team has in fact already defined it, clearly and succinctly, and made it easily accessible straight from inside a Google Chrome tab...

~
‎'fnarr fnarr fnarr' (exclamation, British informal): used to represent sniggering, typically at a sexual innuendo. E.g., 'That’s some package! (Said the bishop to the actress, fnarr fnarr)' [Origin: 1980s: perhaps imitative of the sound of suppressed laughter]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tomoyuki Kono  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:33
Member (2010)
English to Japanese
+ ...
Why the fuss? Oct 2, 2011

an entry in the OED gives a word a symbolic status of acceptability but nothing more than that. Editors chose the word after finding that (1) by analysing millions of words from a variety of sources the word 'kewl' was shown to be used frequently and consistently over many years (i.e. not a trendy word that disappears after a couple of years) and (2) the word with that particular spelling has been used in many written sources, not just in conversations, which gives kewl more authenticity as a word in its own right. If anything, the editors err on the side of caution. To me they are not like those broadsheet newspaper columnists who try to demonstrate their imagined connection with the mass folk by using fashionable words rather uncomfortably.

I don't mean criticise anyone here. You are probably only engaging in a light-hearted weekend banter. But I get irritated every time someone has a go at the OED for including a slang word. They just can't win: if they decide to be conservative in their selection, they get the usual 'ivory-tower' type labels thrown at them. If they include a couple of slang words, they suddenly become the middle-aged bespectacled men and women trying to be younger than they are.

Anyway, my point was that the OED uses a state-of-the-art computer system to process millions of potential candidate words. If kewl came up for selection, that means it's been statistically shown to be used widely and frequently.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
FarkasAndras
Local time: 03:33
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Not really Oct 2, 2011

Tomoyuki Kono wrote:
the OED uses a state-of-the-art computer system to process millions of potential candidate words. If kewl came up for selection, that means it's been statistically shown to be used widely and frequently.

But it doesn't mean that it's anything more than a spelling variant of 'cool' with no distinct meaning of its own.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
George Hopkins
Local time: 03:33
Swedish to English
Really kewl Oct 2, 2011

Must be from the Swedish kul, meaning funny, amusing. (Long u).
As in: ha kul = have fun. Det var kul att träffas = it was nice meeting you.

There lots more Swedish words available. Some have already been pinched, eg, ombudsman, primus, abba.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tomoyuki Kono  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:33
Member (2010)
English to Japanese
+ ...
two separate points Oct 2, 2011

FarkasAndras wrote:

Tomoyuki Kono wrote:
the OED uses a state-of-the-art computer system to process millions of potential candidate words. If kewl came up for selection, that means it's been statistically shown to be used widely and frequently.

But it doesn't mean that it's anything more than a spelling variant of 'cool' with no distinct meaning of its own.


I see what you mean but I wasn't really referring to the meaning of the word. I merely wanted to point out that the editors don't just pick up some random slang words they fancied. You wrote:

I don't know why anyone thought it was a good idea to put rarely used slang spelling variants of a word in the dictionary.


I wanted to say that the word, on the basis of the analysis of the OED database, isn't rare or sporadically used in spite of your impression. As far as the issue of 'spelling variant' goes, I'm inclined to agree with you in this case but the OED site states:

kewl adj. Representing an affected or exaggerated pronunciation of cool adj., esp. in the language of electronic communications [1990].

So they must have decided that its usage is distinct enough to warrant a separate lemma of its own. Historically there are so many words which start off as little more than spelling variants but which nevertheless go on to develop new meanings of their own. As I said, I don't think 'kewl' is a particularly strong case but then again, I respect the editors; I certainly don't have a problem with it.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 18:33
English to German
+ ...
I agree. Oct 2, 2011

FarkasAndras wrote:
that it's anything more than a spelling variant of 'cool' with no distinct meaning of its own.


They might as well add "pleeze", a spelling variant wildly popular among teenagers. It still means "please" and doesn't constitute a "new word".


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Sarah Elizabeth
Italy
Local time: 03:33
Italian to English
it is listed as a spelling variant, not as a new word Oct 3, 2011

For those who don't subscribe (or who didn't follow the proz.com link to the outline version of the dictionary entry), it's not listed as a new word.

In the OED it is listed (in the outline version of the entry) as "representing an affected or exaggerated pronunciation" of cool, which is true, and it is accompanied with sample sentences demonstrating usage. Moreover, it is presented as = to the eighth sense of the adj. cool. The full entry presumably provides more information.

In the Oxford Dictionary of English it's simply listed as a spelling variant of the third sense of the adjective "cool". Here it's accompanied by a brief explaination of the the origin of the variant and a sampling of 20 instances in which it has been used, to provide some usage context.

Not sure where the idea popped up that it is listed as a new word, but of course it is not, 'cuz it's not (a new word).



Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Oxford English Dictionary adds ‘Kewl’

Advanced search







TM-Town
Manage your TMs and Terms ... and boost your translation business

Are you ready for something fresh in the industry? TM-Town is a unique new site for you -- the freelance translator -- to store, manage and share translation memories (TMs) and glossaries...and potentially meet new clients on the basis of your prior work.

More info »
WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search