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Fiscal cliff heard round the world: how the term translates across the globe

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Teresa Borges
Portugal
Local time: 03:12
Member (2007)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Fiscal cliff Jan 2, 2013

In Portugal, is being called by the media as "precipício orçamental"...

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Giles Watson  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 04:12
Italian to English
Baratro fiscale Jan 2, 2013

In Italy, they're calling it the baratro fiscale.

G.

[Edited at 2013-01-02 21:30 GMT]


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Giles Watson  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 04:12
Italian to English
Meanwhile in Greece... Jan 2, 2013

... it's called the δημοσιονομικός γκρεμός.

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texjax DDS PhD  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:12
Member (2006)
English to Italian
+ ...
Precipizio fiscale Jan 2, 2013

This is another term which is often used in the Italian media.

In addition, both "precipizio fiscale" and "baratro fiscale" are much more common than "abisso fiscale". (Since when Twitter users are a reliable source of information?).
Research and fact-checking should be staples of (good) journalism.


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Marco Oberto  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 04:12
Member (2003)
English to Italian
+ ...
baratro fiscale/precipizio fiscale/voragine fiscale Jan 2, 2013

Giles Watson wrote:

In Italy, they're calling it the "baratro fiscale".

G.


You can find it translated as 'precipizio fiscale' (I personally don't like it).
A possible synonym is: 'voragine fiscale'. I heard it on a few occasions on the TV and used it myself.


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Giles Watson  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 04:12
Italian to English
YMMV Jan 2, 2013

MRC - Finance wrote:

Giles Watson wrote:

In Italy, they're calling it the "baratro fiscale".

G.


You can find it translated as 'precipizio fiscale' (I personally don't like it).
A possible synonym is: 'voragine fiscale'. I heard it on a few occasions on the TV and used it myself.


Well, I work for the Corriere della Sera, which seems to have opted for "baratro fiscale".

Obviously, other translations are available


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Texte Style
Local time: 04:12
French to English
en français Jan 2, 2013

I have heard "mur fiscal" (fiscal wall)

Not that any of the expressions have made any of it any clearer to me.
(But please don't explain, I have a feeling that ignorance is bliss here)


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Nadia Bacal-Mainville  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 22:12
English to French
Fiscal cliff in Canada (FR) Jan 2, 2013

Here in Montreal it's called:
"mur fiscal" or "précipice fiscal" ☺

[Edited at 2013-01-02 22:19 GMT]


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texjax DDS PhD  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:12
Member (2006)
English to Italian
+ ...
More than one possible Italian translation Jan 2, 2013

Giles Watson wrote:

Well, I work for the Corriere della Sera, which seems to have opted for "baratro fiscale".

Obviously, other translations are available


Apparently there is no consensus on the translation of fiscal cliff into Italian, and the Corriere is no exception.

In this article, they use both precipizio and baratro fiscale http://archiviostorico.corriere.it/2012/dicembre/31/altra_fumata_nera_per_budget_co_0_20121231_8cca5078-5312-11e2-a259-25e4e5485fba.shtml

However, at the Corriere della Sera archive can be found:
24 occurrences for "precipizio fiscale"
17 occurrences for "baratro fiscale"
1 occurrence for "abisso fiscale", and
0 occurrence for "voragine fiscale"
http://sitesearch.corriere.it/archivioStoricoEngine.action

I also checked the number of Google hits:
53,200 occurrences for "precipizio fiscale"
73,500 occurrences for "baratro fiscale"
2,510 occurrence for "abisso fiscale", and
583 occurrences for "voragine fiscale"

Apparently the Italian Mario Draghi, President of the European Central Bank, translated the term as "burrone del bilancio", which did not meet with much success. (Not surprisingly, I might add.)

The Treccani encyclopedia suggests "precipizio fiscale"
http://www.treccani.it/vocabolario/fiscal-cliff_(Neologismi)/

There might also be other variants which I am not aware of.


[edited for typo]

[Edited at 2013-01-02 22:31 GMT]


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Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:12
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Very annoyingly.... Jan 2, 2013

texjax DDS PhD wrote:

This is another term which is often used in the Italian media.

In addition, both "precipizio fiscale" and "baratro fiscale" are much more common than "abisso fiscale". (Since when Twitter users are a reliable source of information?).
Research and fact-checking should be staples of (good) journalism.


Very annoyingly, some Italian newspapers have decided to call it "il fiscal cliff" (pronounced "fees cal cleefeh").

[Edited at 2013-01-02 22:51 GMT]


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Alvaro Garcia  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:12
English to Spanish
+ ...
in Spanish (Spain) Jan 3, 2013

In Spain, the fiscal cliff is widely known as the "abismo fiscal". [abismo = abyss]

[Editado a las 2013-01-03 00:43 GMT]


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Zeki Guler  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 03:12
Member (2012)
English to Turkish
in Turkish Jan 3, 2013

in Turkish, it is called as "mali uçurum"

[Edited at 2013-01-03 06:29 GMT]


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Gudrun Wolfrath  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 04:12
English to German
+ ...
Fiskalklippe in German Jan 3, 2013

according to the Süddeutsche Zeitung.

Gudrun


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Jane F
France
Local time: 04:12
Member (2012)
French to English
In France Jan 3, 2013

The French daily paper 'Le Figaro' uses the term "précipice budgétaire", while 'Le Monde' uses the more literal translation "falaise budgétaire".

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Giles Watson  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 04:12
Italian to English
Fair enough, Bruna Jan 3, 2013

texjax DDS PhD wrote:

Giles Watson wrote:

Well, I work for the Corriere della Sera, which seems to have opted for "baratro fiscale".

Obviously, other translations are available


Apparently there is no consensus on the translation of fiscal cliff into Italian, and the Corriere is no exception.

In this article, they use both precipizio and baratro fiscale http://archiviostorico.corriere.it/2012/dicembre/31/altra_fumata_nera_per_budget_co_0_20121231_8cca5078-5312-11e2-a259-25e4e5485fba.shtml



Fair enough, Bruna, I should have checked!

@Tom
There are quite a few occurrences of "fiscal cliff" with no explanation on the Corriere website, e.g.

http://www.corriere.it/esteri/13_gennaio_02/fiscal-cliff-le-tre-linee-dell-accordo_60801a88-54b2-11e2-bf2b-52f2ccd54966.shtml

However, I would have thought that outwith the business pages the term still needs some explanation, which it gets elsewhere:

http://www.corriere.it/esteri/12_dicembre_31/usa-fiscal-cliff-accordo-tasse-obama_306de14a-5359-11e2-9db6-5f0af8902a56.shtml

It will be interesting to see which Italian translation prevails, particularly if commentators like this one

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/nils-pratley-on-finance/2013/jan/02/fiscal-cliff-income-spending-cuts?INTCMP=SRCH

are right and the situation presents itself again in March.


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