Speaking official language “not a human right”

This discussion belongs to Translation news » "Speaking official language “not a human right”".
You can see the translation news page and participate in this discussion from there.


Balasubramaniam L.  Identity Verified
India
Local time: 22:34
Member (2006)
English to Hindi
+ ...
Weird logic indeed Apr 22, 2013

I would taken kindly to this if the right to your mother tongue is considered as a basic human right which is routinely violated by the immigration departments of most developed countries. But insisting the use of official language as a human right smacks of a ploy to promote the official language (Frengh?) by devious means.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 18:04
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
"Rights of the languages" strikes again Apr 22, 2013

No, no, what Bill 14 plans to promote is what we have experienced here in Spain: a part of the population forcing companies and people to use a language and only that language in all spheres of human activity, thus giving a language more rights than the individuals and creating an alienated society in which only part of the population is allowed to use their mother tongue in their normal day.

What is sold as rights means in fact that they strip part of the population of their rights, and what to me is really sad is to see that the part of the population that is privileged by this legislation are very content to see the other part of the population suffer and struggle. Does not speak very well of their society, if you ask me.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 18:04
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Freedom of... Apr 22, 2013

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:
What is sold as rights means in fact that they strip part of the population of their rights...


I'm reminded of the interpretation of "freedom of religion" in one-religion countries, where that freedom is interpreted to mean "you are free to adhere to this one religion".


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 18:04
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Interesting principle of law Apr 22, 2013

Samuel Murray wrote:
I'm reminded of the interpretation of "freedom of religion" in one-religion countries, where that freedom is interpreted to mean "you are free to adhere to this one religion".

Exactly. Or for instance now in Catalonia, where parents cannot get education in Spanish because law establishes that both Catalan and Spanish shall be vehicular languages (now the interesting part) "in the proportion that the regional educational authorities consider appropriate", which results in the fact that the vehicular language is always Catalan and never Spanish.

When the few brave Spanish-speaking parents who initiate a life-long pilgrimage in court to defend their rights reach the supreme court after many years of struggle and the supreme court determines that regional authorities are breaking the law, the authorities say that the ruling does not alter their practices because they are already complying with the law mentioned above: they consider that Spanish is not appropriate in their education, and therefore never use Spanish as a vehicular language.

It's sad to see that this will begin to happen very soon in Quebec... if it is not happening already. Maybe our colleagues in the area can report about whether you can receive education in English there.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Michael Barnett
Local time: 12:04
English
+ ...
English education in Quebec Apr 23, 2013

Tomás Cano Binder, CT wrote:

It's sad to see that this will begin to happen very soon in Quebec... if it is not happening already. Maybe our colleagues in the area can report about whether you can receive education in English there.


Hi Tomas,

It's been going on in Quebec for the past 40 years. The situation there is surprisingly similar to Catalonia. The current nationalist provincial government, the Parti Quebecois, proposes to make Quebec an independent state with an economic association with the rest of Canada.

Since the 1970s a Quebec born student can only attend an English school if at least one of his parents attended a Quebec English school. Everyone else, including English speaking students from other Canadian provinces and all foreign born students must attend school in French.

The Anglo minority of Quebec, about 15% of the population, has been subjected to all sorts of legislative indignities since the early 70s. At one point it was literally illegal to post a commercial sign that displayed any English. (Yes, you read that correctly.)

The discriminatory policies have lead to the exodus of hundreds of thousands of native English speakers from Quebec since the 1970s including the cream of my generation.


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Speaking official language “not a human right”

Advanced search







Anycount & Translation Office 3000
Translation Office 3000

Translation Office 3000 is an advanced accounting tool for freelance translators and small agencies. TO3000 easily and seamlessly integrates with the business life of professional freelance translators.

More info »
WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search