Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
The strange rise of Denglisch

This discussion belongs to Translation news » "The strange rise of Denglisch".
You can see the translation news page and participate in this discussion from there.


Roy Williams  Identity Verified
Austria
Local time: 09:55
German to English
more terms Nov 7, 2013

The ones I hate the most include: down/upgeloadet and upgedatet

Direct link Reply with quote
 

neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:55
Spanish to English
+ ...
The world catches up at last Nov 7, 2013

We used to talk like this at school, making up "private languages", usually consisting of adding syllables or truncating words, sort of like "Hog Latin", which I think may be a similar phenomenon. I do agree though, that "upgeloadet" sounds terrible. If I heard a German saying it I'd think they were taking the... mickey.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
jcjenkins  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:55
German to English
Amusing, though! Nov 8, 2013

It's always funny and interesting when the structure of a language is used (as in the past tense here) to make "new" words. One of my favourites is "gehighlightet".

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Wolfgang Vogt  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:55
English to German
+ ...
Gutos son gustos Nov 8, 2013

neilmac wrote:

We used to talk like this at school, making up "private languages", usually consisting of adding syllables or truncating words, sort of like "Hog Latin", which I think may be a similar phenomenon. I do agree though, that "upgeloadet" sounds terrible. If I heard a German saying it I'd think they were taking the... mickey.


I had a client not so long ago who wanted me to replace every instance of "hochgeladen" with "upgeloaded"... There's a nice saying in Spanish that starts with "Gutos son gustos dijo una vieja..."


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Kirsten Bodart  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:55
Dutch to English
+ ...
Nothing special Nov 8, 2013

In Dutch there are even special rules for the conjugation of English verbs mainly.

'Gedeletet', for example. Or 'geüpdatet'. Or the false 'upgedatet', because people are not sure if it's a separable verb or not.

To be honest, I find 'hochladen' sounds absolutely horrible, as does 'Rechner' for 'computer'.

German has resisted the use of English very much, but it seems it's coming.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 09:55
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Handy Nov 8, 2013

Many of us knew that something was going to be really wrong when people started to say "Handy".

Direct link Reply with quote
 

svenfrade  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:55
French to German
+ ...
Terrible Nov 9, 2013

Roy Williams wrote:

The ones I hate the most include: down/upgeloadet and upgedatet


These terms really make me cringe every time I have to read them. Personally, I would downright refuse to use them.

And I have to disagree with Kirsten Bodart, German has most certainly not resisted the use of English, it has been absolutely everywhere for quite a while.
Just think of Callcenter, Servicecenter, Hotline, Helpdesk, relaxen, chillen, Meeting, Business etc. to name just a few examples. German business speak is full of Denglisch, some probably believe it makes them seem more important.

Some also seem to think that they sound incredibly "hip" if they use English terms for "Schönheit", "Körper" etc. and come up with things like "Beauty für deinen Body". Ridiculous IMHO.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Post removed: This post was hidden by a moderator or staff member for the following reason: http://www.proz.com/siterules/forum/7#7

Sarai Pahla (MD) MBChB
Germany
Local time: 09:55
Member (2012)
Japanese to English
+ ...
LOLst du? Nov 11, 2013

Gosh, I have not laughed this hard in a long time... "Beauty für deinen Body" in particular had me in stitches.
"Fixen" also makes me laugh whenever I hear it. "Shitstorm" has to rank as my all-time favourite though. I don't think "Handy" is an Anglicism though because hand in German is Hand... so the etymology could very well be purely German.

Sure, the purists are probably all up in arms about their language changing but English just happens to be the international language of choice at the moment, which means it pops up everywhere. Granted, it sounds ridiculous, but frankly, I think English knowledge in Germany still has some cache, otherwise people wouldn't try to forcibly squeeze it into German shoes, so to speak. Once it loses that status and, for example, Chinese becomes the global language of choice (yes, I am being facetious), you'll have even more hilarious examples of linguistic transmutation. I'm quite sure of it.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Daina Jauntirans  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:55
German to English
+ ...
And a CAT tool-related one Nov 12, 2013

Almost every German client I have who uses CAT tools says "gecleant" for a segmented file that has been cleaned.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jean-Pierre Artigau
Canada
Local time: 03:55
English to French
+ ...
Also Frenglish and Spanglish Nov 13, 2013

There are also numerous examples of Frenglish (French-English mixture) in France and Canada (and probably elsewhere), the funniest part being pronunciation of English words by people who have no knowledge of English; and Spanglish (Spanish-English mixture) is invading the United States and Mexico.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Texte Style
Local time: 09:55
French to English
Franglais surely Nov 13, 2013

Jean-Pierre I was just about to observe that we talk about "Chinglish" and "Denglisch" and "Spanglish", but when it comes to English invading the French langauge it's called "franglais"

and wondering about the significance of that...

And there you are in Quebec talking about "Frenglish"? In Quebec, the last bastion of pure French?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jean-Pierre Artigau
Canada
Local time: 03:55
English to French
+ ...
Frenglish and franglais Nov 13, 2013

You are right, the usual French word to designate this unacceptable mixture is "franglais". However when I speak English I tend to use the word "Frenglish" humoristically, and so do my friends; over time I have tended to use it as an accepted English word, but I doubt you would find it in any dictionary. This is the subject of numerous jokes among the people I know, in both languages.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

JaneD  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 09:55
Member (2009)
Swedish to English
+ ...
Another vote for linguistic purity Nov 13, 2013

Personally I prefer it when the source text/speaker sticks to their own language. I've never found it so difficult to interpret as when someone insists in speaking half of the time in very poor English and the rest in French, and yesterday I was stuck for ages trying to work out how to rephrase the French use of "roaming" regarding mobile services, which they don't use quite as we would in English!

Oh, and yes, Tomás - I also came across "handy" while working for an Austrian company and found it curiously repulsive!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Helen Shiner  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:55
Member (2008)
German to English
+ ...
Sandwiches Nov 14, 2013

My favourite will always be the architectural historian, who, when describing a funerary monument in fine detail, in all seriousness described it as being gesandwichet between two columns. I think he was rather hurt when I couldn't stop myself laughing out loud at that one.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Jared Tabor[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

The strange rise of Denglisch

Advanced search







BaccS – Business Accounting Software
Modern desktop project management for freelance translators

BaccS makes it easy for translators to manage their projects, schedule tasks, create invoices, and view highly customizable reports. User-friendly, ProZ.com integration, community-driven development – a few reasons BaccS is trusted by translators!

More info »
SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search