State Can Certify American Indian Language Teachers for Public Schools

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LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:16
Russian to English
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This is great. Dec 28, 2013

I wish I could attend some classes, but they don't teach Native languages here, at least not that I know of anything like that. The classes are mostly meant for the tribe members, I guess.
They are ordinarily called Native American languages. I don't know why they called them American Indian -- this term used to be very improper in the past.

[Edited at 2013-12-28 15:53 GMT]


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Woodstock  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 22:16
German to English
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Naming preferences of the US' indigenous population Dec 29, 2013

I have several Native Americans friends, and they usually prefer to be named according to their tribe, like Anishinaabe or Blackfoot. They often call themselves Indian or ndn, the latter is also used as a popular Twitter hashtag, i.e. "#ndn", but they generally prefer non-indigenous people to call them Native Americans. In academic circles the "American Indian" designation is often used to distinguish them from people from India, as in the example cited or the National Museum of the American Indian (http://nmai.si.edu/home/). In Canada - and sometimes elsewhere - "First Peoples" is common, as is "First Nations" for the tribes in a generic sense: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Nations .

Most North American indigenous languages are in danger of extinction or have already disappeared for one reason only, but I believe that crosses the line of subject matter that can be discussed at ProZ, so I will only refer to the many, many, many posts written by Ojibwa (PhD in Anthropology) at Native American Netroots for anyone interested in history we were not taught at school (in the US): http://nativeamericannetroots.net/ as just one example. There is a growing Native American presence on the internet, so it's much easier to find sources than there used to be. Luckily there are also some strong initiatives to preserve indigenous languages in the US, so there's hope that these remaining endangered languages may not be lost forever. For others it is already too late.

Edited to clarify a point.



[Edited at 2013-12-29 10:09 GMT]


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LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:16
Russian to English
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Yes, many members of the Native American tribes Dec 29, 2013

call themselves Indian [indin] -- the vowel preceding the n should really be a schwa, but it is impolite if anybody else called them Indian.
I learned some Lacota in my college years, and a little of two or three other languages, but this is about it. Not much. Just basics.

[Edited at 2013-12-29 21:58 GMT]


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