Translators Without Borders helping to translate Ebola prevention messages

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Jyotsna Bhatia
India
Local time: 22:47
Member (2011)
Italian to English
+ ...
Translators Without Borders helping to translate Ebola prevention messages Aug 22, 2014

Translators Without Borders helping to translate Ebola prevention messages

 

LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 12:17
Russian to English
+ ...
Yes, this is great. Aug 23, 2014

Really needed. They should warn people not to eat monkeys and bats, especially. Perhaps they can send them some food so they do not have to eat bats.

 

Orrin Cummins  Identity Verified
Japan
Local time: 02:17
Japanese to English
+ ...
But... Aug 23, 2014

LilianNekipelov wrote:

Really needed. They should warn people not to eat monkeys and bats, especially. Perhaps they can send them some food so they do not have to eat bats.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWsWhypMjYM


 

LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 12:17
Russian to English
+ ...
Well, I think bats are cute Aug 23, 2014

but not really appetizing--I would not take them for food, if I saw them. Chicken does not look too appetizing, either, when it has all the feathers on, to tell you honestly. I was vegetarian for a part of my life--perhaps that's why. Now, I eat certain types of meat, sporadically.

Eating monkeys and bats proves deadly these days, regardless of the national customs, so perhaps some more affluent countries could send them somme chicken at least.


 

B D Finch  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 18:17
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Important to check literacy levels in the languages concerned before translating Sep 6, 2014

While translating into local languages is vital, it is also important to realise that some of those 500 languages will not be written languages. In countries with that number of languages, there will be a smaller number of written languages and many people will be bilingual or multilingual and that includes people who are illiterate or have limited literacy. Those who are literate will often be literate in a language other than the one they speak at home. The countries concerned have high levels of illiteracy or limited literacy. So, to get information to the 30% of the population who do not speak English, Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba, it is also essential to have outreach workers who can communicate verbally in some (but not necessarily all) of those other languages. However, literacy levels also need to be taken into account for the 70% who do speak English, Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba, for whom translating and printing information is only a first step.

I remember many years ago being part of a women's equality group who wanted to communicate with Gujerati speaking women in a factory in England. We produced leaflets in Gujerati, only to find that the women who were literate were not literate in Gujerati but in Hindi. When we produced leaflets in Hindi, the women who read them could verbally communicate the contents, in Gujerati, to the other women.

[Edited at 2014-09-06 18:52 GMT]


 

Nicholas Ferreira  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 12:17
Spanish to English
+ ...
TWB also looking for Krio, Mende and Temne speakers Oct 21, 2014

As you know, the 2014 Ebola Outbreak in West Africa has inundated the news. This major health concern affecting several countries has been compounded by a lack of localized language skills and dissemination of information about the virus to potentially affected communities. Click on the Ebola Outbreak infographic here: http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/west-africa-outbreak-infographic.pdf.
The National Language Service Corps (NLSC) has reached out to Federal agencies that have an in-depth knowledge of the Ebola Outbreak and the affected communities. At this time, the NLSC does not have an assignment; however, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is working with Translators without Borders (TWB), a non-profit organization that provides translation services to support humanitarian efforts.
Since the rise of the Ebola crisis, TWB has translated posters and informational materials from the CDC, International SOS, and Doctors without Borders into Yoruba, Hausa, Igbo, and Swahili. Most printed information about Ebola is in English or more widely spoken African languages, leaving out smaller language communities that are also affected by the virus. This issue can be addressed by providing educational materials about Ebola in the localized languages of the affected populations.
You can help! Volunteer! There are still communities that are in dire need of accurate information about the symptoms, spread, and treatment of the virus –information in the language they use every day. Specifically, there is a critical need for content in the Krio, Mende, and Temne languages. For more information about Translators without Borders and to sign up as a volunteer translator, please visit http://translatorswithoutborders.org/Volunteers/Translator-app.
Spread the Word: You can make a difference in the fight against Ebola! If you do not speak the Krio, Mende, or Temne languages, please spread the message to someone who does.


 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:17
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Serious, reasoned information about Ebola Oct 21, 2014

Anyone seeking balanced, serious information about Ebola should read this article in the "London Review of Books" by Paul Farmer, who is a professor of global health at Harvard, an infectious disease physician at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and a co-founder of Partners in Health:

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v36/n20/paul-farmer/diary

I would also like to emphasise, as others have pointed out, that only translators with very specialised, accurate medical knowledge would be suitable to do the sort of work discussed in this thread. It is vital that the information imparted be correct and unambiguous. It is quite literally a matter of life and death.

[Edited at 2014-10-21 07:42 GMT]


 


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Translators Without Borders helping to translate Ebola prevention messages

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