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Interpreters, translators call for warrants to regulate profession

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LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:57
Russian to English
+ ...
Yes, I think the profesion should be slightly regualted. Nov 25, 2016

You don't need 12 years of training by someone. In fact, translators may be better off training themselves, just under some, limited, supervision. Half a year may do if someone speaks both of the languages almost to the same level. "Native' if you like that word, or some top educated level, otherwise.

[Edited at 2016-11-25 10:16 GMT]


 

The Misha
Local time: 10:57
Russian to English
+ ...
Sure thing, issue a warrant - Nov 25, 2016

for the arrest and prosecution of all these individuals trying to bring the government into yet another area it doesn't belong in.

 

Richard Bartholomew  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 16:57
Member (2007)
German to English
I'm dead set against it. Nov 25, 2016

I like the profession just the way it is. If folks can't find a translator or interpreter who can produce an acceptable result at a decent price, then that's their problem. Fobbing off that responsibility on your dear elected representatives is the path of least resistance and has demonstrably led to disaster in myriad other contexts. Don*t even think about it.

[Edited at 2016-11-25 17:27 GMT]


 

John Fossey  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 10:57
Member (2008)
French to English
Whose jurisdiction? Nov 25, 2016

How on earth are you going to regulate this profession? Interpreters perhaps, because they have to be physically present in a particular location. But the translation profession is borderless, and therefore jurisdiction-less.

 

LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:57
Russian to English
+ ...
It is partilaly regulated in the US, isn't it? Nov 27, 2016

most court interpreters are certified or approved, at least in New York State and the Consortium, except some rare language, but even those interpreters have to take an English language test, submit references, experience and have a background check done on them. That may be the reason that interpreters here still make $50-200/hr, rather than $8.25 or whatever it is, the minimum wage.

 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 11:57
English to Portuguese
+ ...
It is fully regulated in Brazil and Spain for official purposes only Nov 27, 2016

LilianNekipelov wrote:

most court interpreters are certified or approved, at least in New York State and the Consortium, except some rare language, but even those interpreters have to take an English language test, submit references, experience and have a background check done on them.


In Brazil, sworn translation & interpreting for official purposes is regulated by a law that was passed in 1943, and that has not been amended ever since, hence it precedes electronic copiers, fax, computers, scanners, printers, the Internet, and countless other contemporary resources. Though we can use computers and printers to replace the typewriter or fountain pen, and PayPal instead of a bag of cash personally brought, anachronisms abound: everything is on paper. The entire system is explained in English here.

The law establishes statewide supervision within Brazil, hence mandatory rates vary to one state to another, though such translations into PT are valid nationwide. Mail no longer travels on horseback, so it's normal to have source docs and translation crossing state borders, if they are long enough to justify (often slightly) lower rates.

Exams for such translators/interpreters usually occur in a specific state 20-30 years apart. Now (2016) there is a proposed bill to make them federal. The result is that we have less than 3,500 such translators covering almost 25 foreign languages in a country having 0ver 200 million inhabitants. Almost half of these sworn translators/interpreters are in the Sao Paulo state, which represents one-third of the Brazilian GNP. A couple states have just one such T/I, several have none, and nobody is allowed to operate as such outside the national territory.

Most countries not having a specific national law on this accept Brazilian sworn translations into their national language, as they imply some kind of governmental endorsement by the document's issuing nation.

IMHO the major reason for such a lackadaisical administration of this matter is that a sworn translation in Brazil causes no additional taxes to be levied than a plain translation.


Spain's equivalent legislation apparently dates back from the 1500s, and the entire process seems to have been updated from time to time to the present days. I wouldn't be a reliable authority to give details on their system.


However... all this applies only to documents intended to serve some OFFICIAL purpose, and hence does not represent an overwhelming portion of the translation market. While I'd be favorable to some system having a similar scope to the Hague Convention on the Apostille (05 Oct. 1961), i.e. to make government-examined and licensed translators' sworn work being accepted by signatory countries for official purposes, it would be useless to regulate the profession for anything else.


 

Alberto Balanza
Malaysia
Local time: 22:57
Member (2008)
Spanish to English
+ ...
I am all for it Dec 14, 2016

I feel being in the translation industry, an unregulated sector as it is, present some unique opportunities but a lot of problems, the main one being:

Without an entity that accredits, sanctions and suspends unethical translators, a lot of people enter the market just keen on making money but without the necessary skills to deliver. The result is a low perception of our industry among consumers. I strongly support government regulatory bodies to streamline the accreditation process for translators & interpreters. Is so hard to separate the good from the bad and the ugly...


 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 16:57
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
So... "warrant" is obviously Maltese English for... something Dec 14, 2016

* Providing interpreters and translators with warrants would introduce a proper system...
* Introduce a warrant in order to certify and regulate the profession.
* A warrant for translators and interpreters does not yet exist in Malta.
* A warrant would bring the profession in line with other EU countries.
* The lack of a warrant allowed unqualified individuals to produce low-level translations of ... official documents.
* The EU regulation ... states that a certified translation carried out by a qualified professional who is recognized by a warrant in one Member State must be accepted in all Member States.
* Qualified Maltese translators ... are currently not in possession of a warrant.
* Official, certified, accredited, sworn translations by foreign translators are accepted in Malta by law, but those carried out by Maltese translators, since not backed by a warrant, can be refused in other Member States.
* The regulating of the professions of Translators and Interpreters by means of a warrant or similar accreditation is the way to establish these new professions locally...


Apparently, "...the EU regulation [2016/1191] of 6 July 2016 states that a certified translation carried out by a qualified professional who is recognized by a warrant in one Member State must be accepted in all Member States." Except that the regulation in question doesn't mention the word "warrant".

Googling for "translator + warrant" got me only this press release, so I suspect that other EU countries don't call this thing a "warrant". Perhaps Maltese colleagues can explain to us what the Maltese press means by "warrant" here.


[Edited at 2016-12-14 09:38 GMT]


 

Hinara  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:57
Member (2011)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Sure thing, issue a warrant - Dec 29, 2016

The Misha wrote:

for the arrest and prosecution of all these individuals trying to bring the government into yet another area it doesn't belong in.


LOL! Well said. If only one could "like" or "thumbs up" your comment.


 

Hinara  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:57
Member (2011)
Spanish to English
+ ...
I am all for individual responsibility not government intervention Dec 29, 2016

Alberto Balanza wrote:
"I strongly support government regulatory bodies to streamline the accreditation process for translators & interpreters."


Why should streamlining and accreditation be in the hands of government? What exactly qualifies them? Who streamlines the government?

"Is so hard to separate the good from the bad and the ugly..."


Speak for yourself. So because you are not discerning, you're going to rely on the government to do it for you? Are government bureaucrats smarter than you?

[Edited at 2016-12-29 17:33 GMT]

[Edited at 2016-12-29 17:34 GMT]


 

Hinara  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 07:57
Member (2011)
Spanish to English
+ ...
I'm dead set against it. Dec 29, 2016

Richard Bartholomew wrote:

Fobbing off that responsibility on your dear elected representatives is the path of least resistance and has demonstrably led to disaster in myriad other contexts. Don*t even think about it.

[Edited at 2016-11-25 17:27 GMT]


Well said Richard. I cringe every time I hear translators and interpreters wanting government bureaucrats to "regulate" our profession. Some people never learn. They see the mess bureaucrats makes of just about anything they touch but expect that by some magical power they will "fix" whatever problems they imagine exist in our profession.


 

jyuan_us  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:57
Member (2005)
English to Chinese
+ ...
Does this newspaper use grammatically correct English? Dec 29, 2016

I think the title of the article should be "Interpreters AND translators callING for warrants to regulate profession".

Don't you, our peers native in English, think so?

I'm curious about whether the structure of the sentence is correct or not. (Whether "warrant" is the right word to use here is irrelevant to my question.)


 

mariealpilles  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 16:57
Member (2014)
English to French
+ ...
Warrant for translators and interpreters Dec 29, 2016

I agree that the idea of a warrant was introduced in Malta where the job is the jungle - but then in that country most things are. On top of that in Malta quality comes far down the ladder, the only thing that counts is money. There is someone who provides regular interpreters for French (for instance) who are italians and do not master the French language properly, but since the rates are much lower than the actual professionals they are chosen. Also Malta is very much politically influenced, so that is another problem.

Apart from Malta I believe that there is no need for a warrant. People judge by results and quality, as is the case in many professions or with many service providers.


 

mariealpilles  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 16:57
Member (2014)
English to French
+ ...
explanation for warrant Dec 29, 2016

I forgot to explain what the Maltese meant by warrant. Honestly they do not really know themselves. They are using the term assimilating it to what lawyers need to be able to practise as lawyers. On top of that I cannot see who is qualified enough to deliver a warrant to an interpreter. They also only referred to court interpreters and translators since they do not have sworn translators and interpreters and have no lists; in Malta it is a question of knowing a judge or a lawyer who asks you to act as such! The things I have heard and seen in courts there are unvelievable: a so-called French interpreter who refuses to use the expression "violation de domicile" claiming that the word is not used in Malta because of its sexual connotation used "invasion de domicile". For the same expert "mauvaise foi" and "mauvaise volonté" are one and the same thing, etc....

 

Amel Abdullah  Identity Verified
Jordan
Arabic to English
+ ...
Special Rules Dec 30, 2016

jyuan_us wrote:

I think the title of the article should be "Interpreters AND translators callING for warrants to regulate profession".

Don't you, our peers native in English, think so?

I'm curious about whether the structure of the sentence is correct or not. (Whether "warrant" is the right word to use here is irrelevant to my question.)


Headlines use a different (abbreviated) style of English.

You will find this style in all English-language newspapers.

In the Washington Post, for example:

Democrats call for special counsel to probe Trump team’s focus on climate scientists

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/12/16/senate-democrats-call-for-special-counsel-investigation-into-trump-climate-inquiry/?utm_term=.e6a8de2cafb5

You should not say "Democrats are calling."

There is a lot of information about this online if you are interested, but this link provides some basic points about headline tenses and other relevant issues:

http://www.englishlessonsbrighton.co.uk/8-grammar-rules-writing-newspaper-headlines/


 
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