Disclosing translators/editors information
Thread poster: sgarygary

sgarygary  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:27
English to Chinese
+ ...
Sep 25, 2015

Hi all,

I have a question regarding disclosing information to the client or not. Recently, I received and managed a project for a client in China. As the project is completed and turned in to the client, they doubted that if I did find someone who is qualified to the job and asked me for the information of the editors and translators. Based on the common sense, I consider the translators and editors as my asset (although we are just a team), and I think that I am not supposed to disclose any information to the client because it is against to the privacy law and should be kept confidentially. This is just my thought.

Would anyone agree? Or is there any one can tell if I am wrong? I want more details on this issue as I am negotiating with the client for full payment.

Thank you,


 

Stepan Konev  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 19:27
English to Russian
Definitely no Sep 25, 2015

They deal and communicate with you as a contractor. All tools, software, dictionaries, outsource translators (subcontractors) are your own resources. Why they care about HOW you do the job, when they must only care IF you do the job. You've done it. They've got the result they wanted. HOW you provide the result is your own business. Your skills, your qualification, your resources. They may argue if the result is good or bad. But not HOW you get the result.

 

Soonthon LUPKITARO(Ph.D.)  Identity Verified
Thailand
Local time: 23:27
Member (2004)
English to Thai
+ ...
Controversial facts Sep 25, 2015

Stepan Konev wrote:

They deal and communicate with you as a contractor. All tools, software, dictionaries, outsource translators (subcontractors) are your own resources. Why they care about HOW you do the job, when they must only care IF you do the job. You've done it. They've got the result they wanted. HOW you provide the result is your own business. Your skills, your qualification, your resources. They may argue if the result is good or bad. But not HOW you get the result.


Translation quality standards, in particular for medical jobs, require qualified personnel for the jobs. This is why I asked for information when I edit bad translation many times. Clients also want to secure qualified personnel for their jobs. I have an idea on hiring a lawyer or a doctor or an accountant for my jobs: I need professional qualifications.

Soonthon L.


 

Michael Newton  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 12:27
Member (2003)
Japanese to English
+ ...
Disclosing translator/editor info Sep 26, 2015

Usually an agency will vet the background of translators before a project is assigned. This could come in the form of a brief fact sheet, educational institutions attended, experience in specific fields and native language. Once the project has been completed and turned in to the end-client, your only responsibility is to address questions the end-client may have, clarifications or revisions. Asking for the name and address of the translator should raise red flags.

 

LilianNekipelov  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 12:27
Russian to English
+ ...
Yes, absolutely. if you are an agency Sep 26, 2015

sgarygary wrote:

Hi all,

I have a question regarding disclosing information to the client or not. Recently, I received and managed a project for a client in China. As the project is completed and turned in to the client, they doubted that if I did find someone who is qualified to the job and asked me for the information of the editors and translators. Based on the common sense, I consider the translators and editors as my asset (although we are just a team), and I think that I am not supposed to disclose any information to the client because it is against to the privacy law and should be kept confidentially. This is just my thought.

Would anyone agree? Or is there any one can tell if I am wrong? I want more details on this issue as I am negotiating with the client for full payment.

Thank you,

do not disclose any translator/editor information. First of all, it may violate the confidentiality agreements, and secondly, the company may contact them directly and pay them directly for their work. Presumably less than you charge. Skipping the agent, sort of.


 

Kuochoe Nikoi  Identity Verified
Ghana
Local time: 16:27
Member (2011)
Japanese to English
Meet them halfway Sep 26, 2015

Give them brief bios of each translator on the project with just enough information to establish their credentials without making it possible for the client to contact them directly.

E.g. "Three translators worked on this project. Translator A [don't use real names] has an B.A. in French and 20 years of in-house translation experience [etc etc]."

If they insist on anything more than that then they're clearly up to something.


 


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