Vendor vs. Vendour (AE vs. BE)
Thread poster: Hristo Kostadinov
Hristo Kostadinov
Local time: 05:15
English to Bulgarian
+ ...
Jan 22, 2009

I wonder if "vendour" is commonly used in Britain. I can't find it in Encyclopedia Britannica...

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Angela Dickson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:15
French to English
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vendor Jan 22, 2009

Standard British spelling of this word (meaning "supplier of goods and/or services") is "vendor", just like the American spelling.

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xxxKhrystene
Australia
Polish to English
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Agree with Angela... Jan 22, 2009

In this case, the BE spelling does not have a 'u' added.

Plain old VENDOR.


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TonyTK
German to English
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An understandable mistake ... Jan 22, 2009

... but it's "vendor" in BE too. I blame the Americans for messing about with our language. They're such an uppity lot. Next thing you know they'll have a black President.

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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:15
Member (2000)
Russian to English
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Words describing someone/thing performing an action end in "or" in British English Jan 22, 2009

Where the word applies to a person, or to a company acting in a similar role, it ends in "or" (e.g. spectator, vendor, exhibitor, objector, translator). This also applies to mechanisms performing a function (e.g.transistor, extractor, calibrator, resistor). The difference comes in nouns describing other objects or properties (e.g. colour, glamour, parlour). These are spelled with "or" in US English. Exceptions to this in US English are words where the ending is pronounced "oor" (detour, velour, paramour).
(I am thinking this out as I go along, so I've probably missed a few rules which others may think of).


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gianfranco  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 01:15
Member (2001)
English to Italian
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Vendour is an ancient form Jan 22, 2009

Hristo Kostadinov wrote:
I can't find it in Encyclopedia Britannica...


The best reference for this kind of research is the OED (the big one) rather than the EB.
In the OED's entry for "vendor" there is a mention of "vendour", as an ancient form, from the French "vendeur" (from vendre=to sell).

It is mentioned only to indicate the ethymology of the word but in modern times "vendour" is not used.


Gianfranco




[Edited at 2009-01-22 16:39 GMT]


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Hristo Kostadinov
Local time: 05:15
English to Bulgarian
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TOPIC STARTER
Thank you! Jan 22, 2009

Thanks for all the answers!

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James McVay  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 22:15
Russian to English
+ ...
Web page on British vs. US spelling Jan 22, 2009

Here's a site I've found useful:

http://www.tysto.com/articles05/q1/20050324uk-us.shtml

It claims to list all of the (1721?) spellings that differ, and it gives some general rules. It doesn't mention the rule Jack cites, though . . .

I do wonder how accurate it is.


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Wendy Cummings  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:15
Member (2006)
Spanish to English
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heehee Jan 30, 2009

I'd love to be a translatour!

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JaneTranslates  Identity Verified
Puerto Rico
Local time: 23:15
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
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Translatour Jan 30, 2009

Wendy Leech wrote:

I'd love to be a translatour!


Would that be a guide to translation sites?


Later: Seriously--thanks to Jack Doughty for some good insights. I never thought about possible patterns.

[Edited at 2009-01-30 18:31 GMT]


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Vendor vs. Vendour (AE vs. BE)

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