academic translation
Thread poster: pirate
pirate
United States
Local time: 07:26
French to English
Oct 5, 2003

Why would someone want to have translated a "validation d'acquis professionnels" form for a particular French university? This is somewhat of a hypothetical question, so I don't have a client to ask. But I ask because I wonder how to render the French educational acronyms: if an American student is going to fill out the form, these degrees don't apply to him or her. But might the form be filled out and then translated as part of a French student's dossier for application to an American university or position? In which case the acronyms would be translated and explained. So 1)who is most likely to request such a translation 2)what is best practice in these situations where there are 2 different national systems and no real equivalent. Thanks.

[Edited at 2003-10-05 20:05]


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lenkl
Local time: 13:26
French to English
work experience Oct 5, 2003

It's "validation d'acquis professionnels", and it pertains to on-the-job experience, not academic achievements, so I don't quite understand your point.

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RHELLER
United States
Local time: 05:26
French to English
+ ...
Touchy subject Oct 5, 2003

Dear Colleague:

People may have different points of view on this subject. I think the best way to go about it is to write the degree in its original form (Bachelor of Arts, for example) and then follow, in parentheses, with an explanation and possible equivalence.

In France, a "licence" is similar to a Bachelor's degree, but it depends upon the school and the field.

In France, there are three levels of "doctorat"; in the U.S., only one Ph.D.

It can be difficult because there are many subtleties. Even in the U.S. a Bachelor's degree can be valued differently due to the status of the University. A degree from a small-town college in the midwest does not equal a degree of the same name from Harvard.

Contact me privately if I can be of more help,

Rita


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pirate
United States
Local time: 07:26
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
academic achievements are relevant Oct 5, 2003



[Edited at 2003-10-05 23:07]


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pirate
United States
Local time: 07:26
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
academic achievements are relevant Oct 5, 2003

Yes, excuse the misaccord. The form asks in detail about "formation" and is destined for the "Service de la Formation Continue" of a French university--so it is for professional retraining in an academic setting.


lenkl wrote:

It's "validation d'acquis professionnels", and it pertains to on-the-job experience, not academic achievements, so I don't quite understand your point.


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lenkl
Local time: 13:26
French to English
training and education, degrees, etc. Oct 5, 2003

pirate wrote:

The form asks in detail about "formation" and is destined for the "Service de la Formation Continue" of a French university--so it is for professional retraining in an academic setting.


lenkl wrote:

It's "validation d'acquis professionnels", and it pertains to on-the-job experience, not academic achievements, so I don't quite understand your point.


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lenkl
Local time: 13:26
French to English
education adn training Oct 5, 2003

So then, your question is not purely hypothetical?
In France, "formation continue" can cover a broad range of subject matters, including languages. It is no necessarily skill oriented.
When the French ask about someone's "formation" they generally mean both education and training. My advice is generally to leave common degrees and diplomas untranslated (B.A,, M.A., Ph.D.) and not even to try and figure out a domestic equivalent: institutions that request such information can be assumed to know what the diplomas correspond to (although it's good to spell out the names of the degrees - like "Bachelor of Science in Economics"). The titles and topics of training programs should of course be translated.


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pirate
United States
Local time: 07:26
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
thanks Oct 5, 2003

Yes, it's complicated, isn't it. Thanks for your help!

Rita Heller wrote:

Dear Colleague:

People may have different points of view on this subject. I think the best way to go about it is to write the degree in its original form (Bachelor of Arts, for example) and then follow, in parentheses, with an explanation and possible equivalence.

In France, a "licence" is similar to a Bachelor's degree, but it depends upon the school and the field.

In France, there are three levels of "doctorat"; in the U.S., only one Ph.D.

It can be difficult because there are many subtleties. Even in the U.S. a Bachelor's degree can be valued differently due to the status of the University. A degree from a small-town college in the midwest does not equal a degree of the same name from Harvard.

Contact me privately if I can be of more help,

Rita



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