Training Human Translators as Opposed to Programming MT Systems
Thread poster: Claudio Porcellana
Claudio Porcellana  Identity Verified
Italy
Dec 22, 2009

http://www.erudit.org/livre/meta/2005/000242co.pdf

another interesting issue about our future ...
;-D

quite interesting the first picture:
"Machine translation as performed by machines or poor-quality human translators"

it seems to me that machines are on the same level of poor translators

and again:
"Good-quality human translators have their own communicative intent that they express in the target text, they do things with words in their translation, rather than trying to convey what original authors have done with words in the source text."

it seems then that machines are on a lower level compared to good translators ...
;-D

Indeed:
"Practicing translators sometimes talk about the anecdotal fear of machines taking over. Will I lose my job as a result of developments in machine translation? The answer, unfortunately, is yes. If you translate like a machine, then a real machine can do the same thing faster, cheaper and more reliably.
The only thing that can be done to compete with machines in the medium term is to provide services
that the machines are not yet capable of providing."

but what do you think about?

Claudio

[Modificato alle 2009-12-22 22:17 GMT]


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Neil Coffey  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:52
French to English
+ ...
Well, duh... Dec 23, 2009

Claudio Porcellana wrote:
"If you translate like a machine, then a real machine can do the same thing faster, cheaper and more reliably.
The only thing that can be done to compete with machines in the medium term is to provide services
that the machines are not yet capable of providing."


So my reaction to this (and to most of the article actually) is well... yes, duh. This is why car factories use robots to spray paint on to car bodies.

Of course, part of what makes a good translator is getting to understand the client's underlying intent of their text, thinking intelligently and creatively about it, and providing the client with a translation which achieves their goals-- be that intent selling more wingles in France, instructing Poles on how to assemble their newly acquired fanglekippler, convince a German bank to give them more credit or whatever. An inherent problem with MT systems (among all of their inherent problems) is that they "know" nothing about wingles, fanglekipplers or German banks.

What I didn't realise, and which seems to be implied by the article, is that any theory of translation contrary to this was heavily advocated in any practical translation course.

[Edited at 2009-12-23 03:30 GMT]


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Fang Ke  Identity Verified
China
Local time: 07:52
English to Chinese
Translations are interpretations... Dec 23, 2009

Unless deliberately trying to do so, a human translator simply would not translate like a machine (any today's machine at least), no matter how poor his or her translation skills may be.

If it's possible machines will someday produce translations indistinguishable from those of human translators, perhaps that would be when human-equivalent artificial general intelligence comes along; if that threshold is reached, it's quite plausible that it will be crossed and machines will outsmart humans soon after – in that scenario sweeping changes to the whole human condition may happen, and whether I can keep my job in this profession would be a relatively petty concern I would believe.

[Edited at 2009-12-23 10:15 GMT]


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david young  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 01:52
French to English
this post Dec 23, 2009

raises an important issue: we tend to compare computer performance to the best human skills (Deep Blue vs Kasparov), and it's true that, in matters relating to human natural language, humans will always have the last word. But perhaps computers have already surpassed "average" human skills in areas like speech recognition and even translation...

Would anyone be interested in a specific forum topic on "the future of natural language processing, and its professional (and philosophical) implications", in which we could post new developments and make silly predictions?


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Claudio Porcellana  Identity Verified
Italy
TOPIC STARTER
the future of natural language processing, and its professional (and philosophical) implications Dec 23, 2009

agree!
we can prepare a support ticket if enough peers are interested

Claudio


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