Translating acronyms of associations and entities
Thread poster: Robert Chroscicki

Robert Chroscicki  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 12:21
Italian to English
Nov 19, 2012

I'm faced with an Italian source text where both the acronym and the full name of an association are both already present, as shown below. The entity does not have their own official acronym in English on its website.

If only the acronym or the name were present, I would obviously put the English translation in brackets, but in this case I'm not sure how to format it, since I want to leave both name and acronym, and a translation is necessary for the reader to grasp the target document.

- Un workshop di incontro con la “Società Italiana di Elettromagnetismo” (SIEm) su un tema di interesse comune -

Any ideas?

[Edited at 2012-11-19 22:25 GMT]


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Robert Chroscicki  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 12:21
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
My own temporary solution Nov 19, 2012

This was my solution on the project I delivered.

SIEm - Società Italiana di Elettromagnetismo (Italian Society of Electromagnetics)

[Edited at 2012-11-19 22:26 GMT]


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Russell Jones  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:21
Italian to English
No problem Nov 19, 2012

I wouldn't say that there is only one acceptable way of doing this but, in my view, your solution is perfectly valid.

I hope you didn't really expect to get helpful advice within 2 minutes, incidentally.
Site members can perform wonders, but miracles take a little longer!

[Edited at 2012-11-19 19:54 GMT]


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Anton Konashenok  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 18:21
Russian to English
+ ...
You are right Nov 19, 2012

Croks, I'd say you have picked the best approach, provided that you also do the following:
1. Check (on Internet or elsewhere) whether the entity in question (SIEm, for instance) has published an official version of its name in your target language, and if so, whether this name has a corresponding acronym.
2. Check whether any publications in the target country (especially official ones) have established a de facto standard in translating the name of this entity into their language, and if so, whether an acronym exists.
One should do both checks because their results may not necessarily coincide, and if they don't, the right selection between the two depends on the target audience of the translation.

Anton

P.S. Depending on the target audience, you may also choose between
"name in the source language (name in the target language)"
and
"name in the target language (name in the source language)"

[Edited at 2012-11-19 20:50 GMT]


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Tina Vonhof  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 10:21
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Your solution is good Nov 19, 2012

But I think I would put the acronym after the Italian name in parentheses, same as in the source text. My suggestion would be to always use square brackets for anything that was not in the source text, such as the English translation, and leave anything in parentheses exactly as in the source text).

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Robert Chroscicki  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 12:21
Italian to English
TOPIC STARTER
Format considerations Nov 19, 2012

There's a further consideration raised by Anton's suggestion:

"name in the source language (name in the target language)"
and
"name in the target language (name in the source language)"

I decided to eliminate the source's quotation marks altogether because I couldn't decide where to place them. IMHO the source shouldn't have had them in the first place given the Title Caps and presence of an acronym. I'd love to hear if you that's what you would have done.

Regarding the suggestion of using square brackets, I would have done so if the text wasn't a press release, which IMHO should rarely if ever contain square brackets. Valid?

[Edited at 2012-11-20 02:43 GMT]


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Anton Konashenok  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 18:21
Russian to English
+ ...
Quotation marks Nov 20, 2012

Croks, different languages have slightly different rules for the use of quotation marks. In English, they are used rather sparingly, and in this case I'd definitely omit them.

By the way, different languages may also differ in capitalisation rules. For example, you may want to capitalise every word (standard for U.S. English), every word except articles, prepositions and conjunctions (standard for U.K. English), or just the first word plus any personal names (standard for Russian).


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neilmac  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 18:21
Spanish to English
+ ...
Good solution Nov 20, 2012

Robert Chroscicki wrote:

This was my solution on the project I delivered.

SIEm - Società Italiana di Elettromagnetismo (Italian Society of Electromagnetics)

[Edited at 2012-11-19 22:26 GMT]


This is what I'd have gone for too.
For example, this morning I came up against IGBE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics). I'd have liked to have called it BIGS, but nobody would know what I was tallking about...


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