CC TRANSLATION
Thread poster: mpazolivares

mpazolivares
Mexico
Local time: 20:47
Member (2009)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Sep 25, 2013

Does anybody knows what a CC translation is?
Please advice.
Thanks!


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Charlotte Farrell  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:47
Member (2013)
German to English
+ ...
What's the context? Sep 25, 2013

Without context I've no idea, unless a client asked you to 'CC translation to....', which means copy whoever into the email when you deliver the translation.

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mpazolivares
Mexico
Local time: 20:47
Member (2009)
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
CC translation Sep 25, 2013

Hi! My client asked me if I was familiar with CC translation... that is all!
I am afraid to ask because it seems that if I ask, I don´t know what it is!
It is regarding subtitling, but I never heard of it...
Thanks a lot!


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Terry Richards
France
Local time: 03:47
French to English
+ ...
Closed Caption? Sep 25, 2013

At a guess...

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Paz González  Identity Verified
Chile
English to Spanish
Closed Captions Sep 25, 2013

Closed Captions, often referred to as CC or just captions, are used as aids to ensure that people who are deaf or hearing-impaired can have a satisfying and enjoyable viewing experience, one mirroring as closely as possible that of a hearing viewer’s where important sound cues and speaker identification are added when it is not obvious from the action onscreen.

This is for films translations or transcriptions or others.


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mpazolivares
Mexico
Local time: 20:47
Member (2009)
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks! Sep 25, 2013

Thanks Paz! You are right!

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Jørgen Madsen  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:47
English to Danish
+ ...
It's not unprofessional to ask... Sep 25, 2013

I don't think you would appear unprofessional if you ask the client.
I sometimes complain to my clients if they use abbreviations I am supposed to know.
Often they are more or less internal non-standard abbreviations, and they drive me nuts sometimes...
Translators are humans. We can't know everything, and the client ought to know.
It could actually show that you are not afraid of asking, if necessary...


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José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 22:47
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Translation??? Sep 25, 2013

Paz González wrote:

Closed Captions, often referred to as CC or just captions, are used as aids to ensure that people who are deaf or hearing-impaired can have a satisfying and enjoyable viewing experience, one mirroring as closely as possible that of a hearing viewer’s where important sound cues and speaker identification are added when it is not obvious from the action onscreen.

This is for films translations or transcriptions or others.


AFAIK closed captions are in the same language as the audio. If there was any translation (e.g. dubbing), it should have been done BEFORE closed captions. They include the full script, transcribed and timed on the video.

Closed captions also include other information, such as noises, e.g. (dog barks), (door slams), (car starts), etc. In case two or more people appear onscreen in a dialogue, unless it is obvious, there is identification on "who said what".

If there is translation involved, it's called "subtitling". IOW the audio will be in one language, and the subtitles will be in another. If professionally done, subtitles will be as concise as possible, so the spectator will have some time left to watch the action after having read them.

There is a technical - constructive if you wish - difference. Closed captions, since the days of analog video (VHS etc.) have been encoded in the video stream itself, being decoded by the TV (and not all of them have this feature). They can be switched on/off.

In the days of film and analog video, subtitles were "burned" onto the video image, so the only way to watch a video without them was to apply some duct tape on the lower part of the screen (OK, a piece of paper covering that would do as well). The point here is that a film or video tape could have only ONE set of subtitles.

Some digital video formats/players may overlay subtitles on video on-the-fly. DVD is quite powerful. One DVD may contain one video and up to 32 different sets of subtitles, selectable one at a time + off.

On top of all these subtitle sets, a DVD may also contain closed captions, however there seems to be issues about some state-of-the-art digital TV sets being able to decode them.


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Nikita Kobrin  Identity Verified
Lithuania
Local time: 04:47
English to Russian
+ ...
If you don't know ask the client Sep 25, 2013

mpazolivares wrote:

I am afraid to ask because it seems that if I ask, I don´t know what it is!


Why it seems you don't know what it is? You in fact don't know what it is. If you don't know ask the client. This is the only professional option. All others are feigning and therefore unprofessional. I suppose you want to be professional not just seem professional, don't you?

NK_TC_Logo_30x31.png


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mpazolivares
Mexico
Local time: 20:47
Member (2009)
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Yes Sep 25, 2013

In fact, I asked and they answered.
Thanks!


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James McVay  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:47
Russian to English
+ ...
Pet peeve Sep 25, 2013

As an old guy whose hearing has gone steadily downhill over the years, I often have closed captions turned on while I'm watching TV. One of my pet peeves concerns the use of closed captions together with subtitles in English-language TV dramas that feature people speaking a foreign language. The closed caption often obscures the subtitle and says something like, "speaking Spanish." I guess it happens because two different people are working in isolation from each other, one doing the subtitling, and one the closed captions.

I suspect that since the target audience for most television programs in the United States is young enough not to need closed captions, nobody much cares about them and they don't get checked in the final version.

I bring that up here because I realize some of you folks might be involved in doing one or the other. Mention it next time.


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