Is "Translated from the [source language]" used outside of literary translation?
Thread poster: gosia_rehfus

gosia_rehfus
United States
Local time: 04:07
English to Polish
Feb 18, 2014

It is commonly seen that literary texts use the phrase "Translated from the Polish [other language]". Is this a phrase used only with literary translation and would be considered incorrect on any other translated document? If so, what phrase is considered a standard for non-literary translations, a variation without "the", such as "Translated from Polish" or "Translation from Polish"?

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EvaVer  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:07
Member (2012)
Czech to English
+ ...
Cannot comment on the grammar issue, Feb 19, 2014

as I am not a native English speaker, but it is certainly used on some legal documents. It would look strange on technical documentation, but I wouldn't hesitate to write it on articles to be published, even in technical fields. The fact that the article wasn's originally written in English may be relevant there.

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Max Deryagin  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 13:07
Member (2013)
English to Russian
They are different things Feb 19, 2014

I investigated into this problem a couple of years ago and I found that the following two phrases mean different things.

"Translated from English" = "Translated from the English language"
"Translated from the English" = "Translated from the English version of the book (or any other material) in question"

As far as I know, the latter wording is used almost exclusively in literary translation.

[Edited at 2014-02-19 09:59 GMT]

[Edited at 2014-02-19 09:59 GMT]


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J.Esq
Poland
English to Polish
yes, it's used elsewhere Feb 19, 2014

gosia_rehfus wrote:

It is commonly seen that literary texts use the phrase "Translated from the Polish [other language]". Is this a phrase used only with literary translation and would be considered incorrect on any other translated document? If so, what phrase is considered a standard for non-literary translations, a variation without "the", such as "Translated from Polish" or "Translation from Polish"?


In certified translations from Polish or English, you are required to state which language you translated a given document from. The usual phrase in the header is "Certified translation from the Polish language" or "...from Polish" | "Certified translation from the English language" or "...from English"

Hope it helps.


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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 10:07
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
Not quite the same thing, but... Feb 20, 2014

I spent a couple of hours today refuting a complaint, and wrote several times

'The Danish says..., which is translated as ...'


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Mario Freitas  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 06:07
Member (2014)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Thanks, Max! Feb 20, 2014

I had never realized that difference. Thanks for sharing!

I investigated into this problem a couple of years ago and I found that the following two phrases mean different things.

"Translated from English" = "Translated from the English language"
"Translated from the English" = "Translated from the English version of the book (or any other material) in question"

As far as I know, the latter wording is used almost exclusively in literary translation.

[Edited at 2014-02-19 09:59 GMT]

[Edited at 2014-02-19 09:59 GMT] [/quote]


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jyuan_us  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 04:07
Member (2005)
English to Chinese
+ ...
I thought and I still believe that Feb 21, 2014

Max Deryagin wrote:

I investigated into this problem a couple of years ago and I found that the following two phrases mean different things.

"Translated from English" = "Translated from the English language"
"Translated from the English" = "Translated from the English version of the book (or any other material) in question"

As far as I know, the latter wording is used almost exclusively in literary translation.

[Edited at 2014-02-19 09:59 GMT]

[Edited at 2014-02-19 09:59 GMT]


The English language and English are exactly the same thing.


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gosia_rehfus
United States
Local time: 04:07
English to Polish
TOPIC STARTER
cont. Feb 21, 2014

Thanks, all. I found an old thread on wordreference.com that confirms what Max said and what I also suspected.

*coiffe* explains it best:

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=642807

The question remains whether the use of that phrase should be deemed incorrect outside of literary translation.


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Is "Translated from the [source language]" used outside of literary translation?

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