How to correctly credit a translator on a philosophy paper
Thread poster: Jorge Jara
Jorge Jara
Chile
Local time: 18:52
English to Spanish
+ ...
Nov 13, 2014

Hello!

I'm doing my first stabs on what, I hope, will be a regular kind of work for me: translation of academic texts. Right now, I'm working on a philosophy paper, intended to be published, and the author wants to make sure that my name appears somewhere, in order to give appropiate credit to my work and asked me to check what's the appropiate way to do it. The thing is, I'm very new at translating academic papers.

Considering that the author is providing her name right below the name of the paper, what should I write? (I guess that "Translated by XYZ" should be enough) and where should I write it? (surely below the author's name)

[Edited at 2014-11-13 17:55 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Piyush Ojha  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:52
English to Hindi
+ ...
Credit for translation in the Acknowledgements section Nov 13, 2014

Academic papers normally contain an 'Acknowledgements' section near the end. That's where credit for translation should be given: 'I am grateful to XYZ for translating this paper from the original {language name}'.

[Edited at 2014-11-13 15:08 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
philgoddard
United States
Member (2009)
German to English
+ ...
Don't hide your light under a bushel! Nov 13, 2014

If it's for a journal, they may have their own guidelines. Otherwise, I would put it immediately below the author's name, perhaps in a smaller font or in italics.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Sheri P  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 17:52
French to English
+ ...
In a footnote or endnote Nov 13, 2014

I agree with Phil that each journal may have its own guidelines.

In my case, whenever I've been acknowledged as the translator of an academic paper (in the social sciences), it has always been in the first footnote or endnote of the paper. The note has been marked with an asterisk or other symbol to set it off from the other (numbered or lettered) notes. The note marker has generally appeared at the beginning of the paper, usually right after the title.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Jorge Jara
Chile
Local time: 18:52
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Lots of different ways! Nov 13, 2014

This is extremely clarifying. I'll talk with her and see what and how can we do this, considering the journal's requirements.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Julia Stepanchuk  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 02:52
English to Russian
+ ...
This very much depends on a journal's policy Nov 15, 2014

Never count on them publishing your name right after the author's name. I ran into this problem once, when I translated a paper, and the author wanted very much to include my name - they even agreed with the journal that my name would be published, but in the end it was still discarded and never appeared in print.

So I agree with the others - using footnotes/endnotes or an acknowledgement section is definitely a good idea. Also, if your author wants to use an acknowledgement section, I would always check with the editors first, because I can easily think of a scenario, where they would not want to include such section ("It does not suit our format", "It does not fit into the word limit", "We could not fit it on the page", etc.). However, I doubt that any decent journal would simply discard an author's note without any warning.


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

How to correctly credit a translator on a philosophy paper

Advanced search







Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »
WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search